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Year
Vol.
(Issue)
Pages
Author(s)
Title
1978
1(1)
4-10
Simon J. Mayo Aroid-hunting in Bahai (Buy)
 ABSTRACT: Despite having been the first area of Brazil to be colonized by the Portuguese, the north-eastern state of Bahia is still poorly-known botanically, particularly in its dry interior region. All the indications are, however, that the flora is very rich, and this applies to the aroids as well as to many other families of plants. Consequently, when in the first three months of 1977 I took part in a Kew expedition to Bahia led by Dr. Raymond Harley, I was particularly keen to refind the many poorly-known Araceae recorded from this region.
1978
1(1)
11-12
Michael Madison On the names of aroids
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 ABSTRACT: It would seem useful in this first issue to clarify some aspects of the naming of plants. The latin name of a plant species consists, technically, of three parts which appear in the following order: first the genus, which is capitalized, ego Philodendron; followed by the species, which is not capitalized, ego giganteum; followed by the name of the person who first described the species, in this case H. W. Schott. So the name of this West Indian species is Philodendron giganteum Schott. In orticultural literature the author's name is often omitted.
1978
1(1)
17-19
Michael Madison The Anthurium leuconeurum confusion
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 ABSTRACT: There are several species of Anthurium with velvety deep green leaves and silver veins which have been for years among the most prized subjects of aroid collections. Recently large numbers of these plants have become available in the nursery trade, with wholesalers supplying plants either by massive collections from the wild or by growing plants from seed, much of the latter taking place in Costa Rica. Most of the plants in the trade are distributed as Anthurium clarinervium or A. crystallinum, but there seems to be no general agreement as to which is which. The following notes should help to clarify the situation.
1978
1(1)
20
 Anonymous First Prize in the Miami show
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 ABSTRACT: The International Aroid Society was awarded first place in the Educational Exhibit Section at the Metropolitan Miami Flower Show last month.
1978
1(1)
21-23
Simon J. Mayo The aroid collection of Roberto Burle-Marx
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 ABSTRACT: The estate of Roberto BurleMarx is near Guaratiba to the southwest of Rio de Janeiro, beyond the Serra da Pedra Branca and the Restinga da Jacarepagua, and occupies a site stretching from the top of a fairly steeply-sloping hillside to its base. The principal botanical interest of his plant collection, which he has amassed over some 30 years or so, lies in the very rich collections of Araceae, Bromeliaceae, Musaceae, Velloziaceae and Orchidaceae. As regards the Araceae, his collections of Anthurium and Philodendron spp. merit special attention, being not only of Brazilian species but also with good representation from Ecuador, Costa Rica, Panama and other parts of the neotropics in which Sr. Burle-Marx has collected.
1978
1(2)
31-53
Michael Madison The genera of Araceae in the northern Andes (Buy)
 ABSTRACT: The north Andean region, which includes Colombia, Ecuador, and Peru, has perhaps the richest flora in the world and is the center of diversity of the family Araceae. The low to middle elevation wet forests of the area abound with aroids which cover the ground, climb up tree trunks, and as epiphytes adorn the outer branches of the trees. Many of our finest ornamental aroids, including Anthurium andreanum, A. crystallinum, Caladium bicolor, and Philodendron erubescens, are derived from this area. The purpose of this paper is to provide a key and brief descriptions of the genera of Araceae of the northern Andes which should enable anyone to identify to genus aroids from the region. The key is also applicable in Central America, but only partly so in the rest of South America where a number of additional genera, principally of the subfamily Aroideae, are found.
1978
1(2)
54-57
Thomas B. Croat A new Anthurium from Panama (Buy)
 ABSTRACT: Anthurium dressleri sp. nov. is described.
1978
1(3)
86-87
Michael Madison Aroid profile no. 2: Anthurium lilacinum
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 ABSTRACT: Anthurium lilacinum Dressler, Selbyana 2:300 (1978). Etymology: From the Greek anthas 'flower,' and aura, 'tail,' referring to the resemblance of an anthurium inflorescence to the tail of a mouse· and Latin lilacinus, 'lilac-colored; referring to the spathe and spadi~.
1979
2(1)
15-25
Thomas B. Croat, George S. Bunting Standardization of Anthurium descriptions (Buy)
 ABSTRACT: A standardization of terminology for both new species descriptions and for floristic treatments would benefit other aroid workers as well as the general users of these works, since complete and uniform descriptions allow for more accurate comparisons. Furthermore, it is necessary to define the many special terms which are necessary to properly describe the species of An thurium. Some of these terms are used here for the first time, and while they are intended especially for use with Anthurium, many are equally appropriate for describing other genera of Araceae and plants of many other families.
1979
2(1)
28-29
Michael Madison Aroid profile no. 3: Anthurium superbum
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 ABSTRACT: Anthurium superbum Madison, Selbyana 5:94 (1978). Anthurium superbum is native to seasonally inundated forest along the Rio Napo in Ecuador, where it grows epiphytically above high water level. The dark purple-green bullate leaves held stiffly erect are very striking, and unlike any other anthurium. A large crop of seedlings is now being grown at Selby for distribution to botanical gardens and horticulturists.
1979
2(1)
30-32
Thomas B. Croat A new Anthurium from Panama
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 ABSTRACT: Anthurium canasas Croat sp. nov. is described.
1979
2(2)
52-61
Michael Madison Protection of developing seeds in neotropical Araceae (Buy)
 ABSTRACT: In flowering plants with animal pollination and seed dispersal the reproductive cycle can be considered to consist of four stages, representing alternating phases of protection and display. In the protective phases immature flowers and fruits are safeguarded from predation and parasitism, while in the display phases pollinators and dispersal vectors are attracted. This alternation of protection and display is accomplished by a variety of mechanisms.
1979
2(3)
67-77
Michael Madison Notes on some aroids along the Rio Negro (Buy)
 ABSTRACT: In the fall of 1978 I spent several months collecting plants along the Rio Negro in the western Amazon in connection with the Projecto Flora Amazonas, an ambitious undertaking to prepare a new flora of the Amazon. Although my chief research interests on this expedition were not directed to aroids, I was able to make observations and collections of a number of species.
1979
2(3)
78-81
Thomas B. Croat Germination of seeds of Anthurium (Buy)
 ABSTRACT: In my attempts to prepare a systematic revision of Anthurium, I have come to appreciate the value of living plants for study and I have consequently been attempting to assemble a more complete living collection of Anthurium. In addition to being used to prepare more complete and accurate descriptions, the plants are useful for associated studies with cytology, anatomy, floral fragrance chemistry and hybridization studies to determine relationships between species.
1979
2(4)
122-24
Mike Bush Hybridizing anthuriums
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 ABSTRACT: The genus Anthurium with over 600 species, contains many fine ornamental plants cultivated for their long-lasting and often striking foliage. One of the most rewarding aspects of growing anthuriums is the development of new forms by making hybrids between various species. The procedure for hybridizing anthuriums is relatively simple, and with a little patience and luck highly attractive new forms can be created.
1979
2(4)
126-127
Michael Madison Aroid profile no. 5: Anthurium punctatum
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 ABSTRACT: Anthurium punctatum N. E. Brown, Gard. Chron. 26:809 (1886). Anthurium puncta tum is native to western Ecuador where it occurs as a pendent epiphyte in tropical wet forest. Like other pendent anthuriums with strap shaped leaves it makes a fine hanging basket plant in cultivation, especially if several shoots are established in a single basket. The plants should be planted in an open, well-drained soil and grown in moderate light.
1980
3(1)
13-18
Mark D. Moffler Qualitative observations on tropical aroid cold tolerance (Buy)
 ABSTRACT: As winter approaches each year, we all become concerned about protecting our tropical plants, especially those which are the most susceptible to cold damage. The fall of 1978 was mild in Tampa, with temperatures seldom reaching below 100C (500F). The mild fall gave many of us a false sense of security and steps for cold protection were put off until "tomorrow". It wa~ this unfortunate procrastination that lead to a premature study of cold tolerance in aroids. My initial idea was to test several landscape and porch plants for cold susceptibility, but unfortunately, I unintentionally tested 46 different aroids.
1980
3(2)
39-48
Fred Dortort In the forests of Costa Rica (Buy)
 ABSTRACT: Not long ago we had the opportunity to travel in Costa Rica for several weeks. We wanted to observe various tropical plants in their habitats, and we hoped that Costa Rica would be a good choice for our project. Aroids were one of the main groups we were looking for, and we found a large number of them.
1980
3(2)
54-55
Mark D. Moffler, Thomas B. Croat, Craig Phillips Short communications
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1980
3(2)
55
Robert Dressler A new name for the dwarf purple anthurium
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 ABSTRACT: Anthurium amnicola Dressler, nom. nov. - Anthurium lilacinum Dressler, Selbyana 2: 300. 1978, not A. lilacinum Bunting, 1975 is discussed.
1980
3(2)
58-60
Michael Madison Aroid profile no. 6: Anthurium andreanum
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 ABSTRACT: Anthurium andreanum Linden, III Hort. 24:43, t. 271 (1877). Writing of his discovery a year later Andre remarked, 'it is without doubt one of the most beautiful, if not the most beautiful, of all my discoveries in South America,' (Ill. Hort. 24:43, 1877). He declined to give a precise locality for the plants in fear that other collectors would set out after them, this probably at the insistence of Linden, who jealously guarded his horticultural monopolies.
1980
3(3)
86-93
Richard C. Sheffer, William L. Theobald, Haruyuki Kamemoto Taxonomy of Anthurium scandens (Araceae) (Buy)
 ABSTRACT: Anthurium scandens (Aublet) Engler is the most common and widely distributed of all Anthurium species ranging throughout the West Indies and tropical Central and South America. The habit is generally a small, vining, inconspicuous, usually epiphytic aroid. Specimens are occasionally cultivated for their attractive fruits which are sometimes eaten. In the past, the strong and flexible stems were used for making baskets and for tying together the framework of huts (Standley, 1937).
1981
4(2)
54-56
Mark D. Moffler Anthurium araliifolium
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 ABSTRACT: I obtained A. araliifolium from the Marie Selby Botanical Gardens in 1978 (Fig. 1, a.,b.). Since this Anthurium is seldom encountered in collections and certainly has horticultural merit (at least for aroid collectors), my thoughts turned to propagation. When I obtained A. araliifolium, three spadices were developing and I decided to self pollinate the flowers in order to have many seeds of this fine plant.
1981
4(3)
77-86
Haruyuki Kamemoto Anthurium breeding in Hawaii (Buy)
 ABSTRACT: Anthurium andraeanum Linden ex Andre was introduced into Hawaii from London by S. M. Damon in 1889. The spathe color of the first introduction was shellpink. Plants were cultivated in the Damon Estate in Moanalua, Oahu, and by the 1930's had been distributed to other estates, nurseries and hobbyists. Dissemination up to that time was relatively slow due to the inherently slow rate of vegetative propagation of anthuriums. In the late 1930's and 1940's growers had learned to propagate anthuriums from seeds. This resulted in the widespread cultivation of this species and its variants in Hawaii. The novel, exotic, attractive and long-lasting anthurium inflorescences began to appear with regularity in local flower shops.
1981
4(3)
91-92
Thomas B. Croat Propagation of Anthurium cuttings
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 ABSTRACT: Recent improvement in the success of propagation techniques employed for general aroid collections prompts me to pass on the information to other members. Though I was not trained as a horticulturist, my trial and error procedures in the establishment of thousands of newly introduced aroids over the course of several years has of necessity educated me. Although I am still not satisfied with my loss rate, there has been so much improvement that I feel compelled to pass on this information in hopes of inducing others to report on successful propagation techniques.
1981
4(4)
118-128
 Anonymous A series of illustrations from Sodiro (Buy)
1982
5(1)
11-12
John Banta Strategies on the breeding of anthuriums
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 ABSTRACT: With the increasing diversity of Anthurium species now being found in collections, it is not surprising that hybrid plants are appearing more frequently than in the past. Aside from the taxonomic problems these hybrids may pose, or answer, they do provide growers with challenging opportunities. Can you imagine a bird's nest type Anthurium with leaf veins like those of Anthurium crystallinum? How would you like an Anthurium hybrid with leaves shaped like those of Anthurium pedatum but with the coloring of Anthurium clarinervum? Plant breeding must be a special province of optimism. I would like to introduce you to a couple of optimistic growers.
1982
5(1)
26-28
 Anonymous A series of illustrations from Sodiro
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1982
5(2)
37-46
Thomas B. Croat Aroid collecting in western South America (Buy)
 ABSTRACT: I set off on my trip to western South America. I began in Ecuador and continued through Peru and returned by way of Colombia. In all, nearly two thousand aroids were collected and sent back alive. Herbarium specimens, notes and photographs were accumulated as well. My principal objective on the three month trip was to locate as many members of the bird's-nest Anthurium group as possible. Thus the search for this group (technically, section Pachyneurium) set the basic itinerary of the trip.
1982
5(2)
47-59
Michael H. Grayum The aroid flora of Finca La Selva (Buy)
 ABSTRACT: Costa Rica is a small Central American nation about the size of Denmark, with a remakable array of climatic regimes, and altitudes ranging from sea level to nearly four thousand meters. One can ascend from semidesert scrub forests on the Pacific slope, up through sodden cloud forests to pa'ramo (a kind of a high altitude chaparral) on the highest peaks, and down again on the Caribbean slope, through alders, elms and oaks, to humid lowlands and rain forests. The plants growing in this multifaceted domain are incredibly diverse, even by tropical standards. Costa Rica boasts nearly twenty-five percent more species of dicots, for example, than the lush tropical isle of Java, and nearly two and a half times as many species of dicot epiphytes (Burger, 1980) - this despite the fact that Java is two and a half times larger than Costa Rica and has yielded fifty percent more herbarium specimens per unit area (Prance., 1978).
1982
5(2)
60-62
 Anonymous A series of illustrations from Sodiro
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1982
5(3)
67-88
Dan H. Nicholson Translation of Engler's classification of Araceae with updating (Buy)
 ABSTRACT: When Hooker (1883) was preparing the treatment of Araceae (Aroideae) for the monumental 'Genera Plantarum,' he basically followed the Schottian system, incorporating Engler's (1879) reduction in the number of genera. The first system was "popularized" by Hutchinson (1959) who, with a reversal of the sequence (bisexual genera first), published essentially an English translation of Hooker's latin. Engler (1905-1920), in his monumental 'Das Pflanzenreich', produced his final treatment of the family, including all then known species in nine volumes. This work remains the standard reference for the family as a whole.
1982
5(4)
103-107
David Burnett The problems of names for Araceae: A proposal for hybrid and cultivars (Buy)
 ABSTRACT: There are internationally accepted rules for naming plants at all of these levels. Further there are rules for naming hybrids between Genera (there are probably no known intergeneric hybrids in Araceae): Hybrids between species and hybrids between cultivars. Generally species hybrids are to be named by a formula (and, if appropriate, a name) and hybrids between cultivars by a name along the lines of cultivars. What I propose in this article is that we must depart, slightly, from the rules of the Code. What I regard as two slight departures may seem, to some, as major. This is a matter for the members to decide.
1982
5(4)
112
 Anonymous Illustration of Anthurium bakeri from Rev. Hort.
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1982
5(4)
114-115
Haruyuki Kamemoto, R. D. Sheffer Anthurium wendlingeri x Anthurium scherzerianum
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 ABSTRACT: In 1974 we germinated seeds from open-pollinated flowers of A. scherzerianum which was growing directly below a plant of A. wendLingeri. Two distinct groups of offspring resulted: A. scherzerianum and the species hybrid, A. scherzerianum X A. wendlingeri.
1982
5(4)
116-121
Robert R. White Panama west (Buy)
 ABSTRACT: As Las Cruces lies only a few miles from the border of Panama, the plants found in the adjacent Panamanian highlands are just as much a part of our local flora as are those of Costa Rica. Therein lay the opportunity for two most enjoyable collecting trips to Panama.
1982
5(4)
121
 Anonymous Photograph: Anthurium willdenovii
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1982
5(4)
123-127
 Anonymous A series of illustrations from Schott's Icones (Buy)
1983
6(1)
31
 Anonymous Errata
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1983
6(3)
85-123
Thomas B. Croat, Richard D. Sheffer The sectional groupings of Anthurium (Araceae) (Buy)
 ABSTRACT: In order to conduct a successful hybridization with Anlhurium it is necessary to have some understanding of the inter-relationships among different species of Anlhurium. This paper will introduce the sectional classification of the genus to you and will detail some examples of inter-sectional crosses that have proven successful. Others, where no success has yet been achieved, will also be reported.
1983
6(4)
132-134
Thomas B. Croat The origin of Anthurium leuconeurum
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 ABSTRACT: The name Anthurium leuconeurum has been in use by horticulturists since 1862 when a plant, believed to have been collected in southern Mexico by Auguste Boniface Ghiesbrecht, was described by the French botanist Charles Lemaire. The plant apparently flourished in European botanical garden hothouse collections for a period of about seven decades. A number of herbarium collections were prepared and placed in herbaria at Kew Gardens, Geneva, Paris and elsewhere; most of these collections were made before 1895. The last such herbarium collection I've seen was prepared in 1935 at the University of Coimbra, Portugal, by L. W. Carrisso and deposited at the Kew Herbarium.
1984
7(1)
25
David Prudhomme Photograph: Anthurium cerocampanense
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1984
7(1)
30
David Prudhomme Photograph: Anthurium helleborifolium (L.) Schott
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1984
7(2)
54-55
Haruyuki Kamemoto Registration of anthurium cultivars
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 ABSTRACT: The Hawaiian Anthurium Society (formerly known as the American Anthurium Society) has been interested in establishing a vehicle to register anthurium cultivars. In 1982 the Society approved the registration of cultivars and appointed a Registration Committee.
1984
7(2)
59
Dewey E. Fisk Photograph: Anthurium ssp. [sic] infructescence collected by F. Fuchs.
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1985
8(4)
103
Thomas B. Croat Photograph: Anthurium sp.
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1985
8(4)
118-137
Thomas B. Croat The Anthurium bredemeyeri complex (Araceae) of Venezuela and Columbia (Buy)
 ABSTRACT: Anthurium bredemeyeri Schott. a Venezuelan endemic in Section Xialophyllium. is redefined and redescribed. Five additional species. all members of Section Porphyrochitonium and previously confused with A bredemeyeri. are described as new. These are A bemardii. AJemandezii, A gehrigeri. A gonzalezii. and A smithii.
1986
9(1)
3-213
Thomas B. Croat, Nancy Lambert The Araceae of Venezuela (Buy Back Issue)
 ABSTRACT: An illustrated treatment of 171 Venezuelan Araceae taxa is provided. Discussion of range, species characteristics and distinction from similar or closely related species is made for each taxon. Sixteen species, three subspecies and one variety are described as new, and three new combinations are made.
1987
10(1)
13-19
James B. Watson Anthuriums for south Florida gardens (Buy)
 ABSTRACT: At a time when we are searching for new dimensions in plant design, anthuriums have been discovered to add excitement to our predictable landscape designs.
1987
10(1)
24-25
 Anonymous Tentative international register of Anthurium hybrids A tentative check list
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 ABSTRACT: The Registration Committee for the International Aroid Society presents a compilation of all known published hybrids in the genus Anthurium.
1987
10(2)
4-16
Josef Bogner Morphological variation in aroids (Buy)
 ABSTRACT: The Araceae or aroid., are a large family of about 2400 species, grouped in 107 genera and these again in nine subfamilies. The aroids are mainly a tropical family and are distributed world-wide. They show great variation in their morphological characters, which will be described in this paper along with some other data.
1988
11(2)
7-14
Mari Marutani, Surawit Wannakrairoj, Haruyuki Kamemoto Chromosome studies on Anthurium amnicola and its hybrids (Buy)
 ABSTRACT: Anthurium amnicola has a somatic chromosome number of 30, the most common number in the genus. There are two pairs of large metacentric chromosomes, three pairs of fairly large acrocentric chromosomes, one pair of satellite chromosomes, and nine pairs of either metacentric or acrocentric small chromosomes. At prometaphase I of meiosis in pollen mother cells 15 bivalents were formed. A. amnicola hybridized readily with A. andraeanum, A. lindenianum, and A. formosum in the section Calomystrium as well as the cultivars 'Calypso' and 'Trinidad' of unknown origin. All interspecific hybrids examined meiotically formed 15 pairs, and all except two hybrids with A. lindenianum showed more than 90% normal tetrad formation. Pollen stainability of these hybrids with acetocarmine ranged from 3.3% to 27.8%, compared to 87.5% in A. amnicola. It is concluded that A. amnicola is genetically closely related to species in section Calomystrium.
1988
11(3)
4-55
Thomas B. Croat Ecology and life forms of Araceae (Buy Back Issue)
 ABSTRACT: The most interesting aspect of the family's ecology is the diversity of adaptive life forms. These range from submerged to free-floating, and emergent aquatics to terrestrial plants and to epilithic or epiphytic forms which may be true epiphytes or hemiepiphytic (growing on trees but rooted in soil). Hemiepiphytism is diverse itself, with some species beginning their lives as terrestrial seedlings, then growing skototropically (toward darkness) until they arrive at the nearest suitable tree ( usually a relatively large one which casts a darker shadow) where a physiological change takes place allowing them to grow toward light (Strong & Ray, 1975). They grow as appressed epiphytes on trees or as vines in the canopy. Others begin their lives as true epiphytes, some reconverting to hemiepiphytes by producing long, dangling roots contacting the forest floor below.
1989
12(1)
25
John Banta Anthurium X 'Fernandez'
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 ABSTRACT: I propose that this grex, A. radicans x A. clarinervium be known as Anthurium x 'Allen Fernandez'.
1990
13(1)
28-33
Nic van der Knaap Cultural techniques for Anthurium andreanum André (Araceae) (Buy)
 ABSTRACT: This paper deals with methodologies and material design used in the Anthurium cut-flower industry in Holland. Physical characteristics of growing media, planting beds, fertilization, climate control, and pest management are discussed. Anthuriumselecties has been in operation since 1974 and concentrates exclusively on the generation of new cultivars of Anthurium for the cut-flower industry.
1992
15
40-43
Michael H. Grayum A remarkable new Anthurium from Costa Rica (Buy)
 ABSTRACT: Anthurium bittneri Grayum, sp. nov. is described.
1993
16
5-11
Julius O. Boos, Hans E. Boos Additions to the aroid flora of Trinidad with notes on their probable origins and uses (Buy)
 ABSTRACT: These notes are based on collections and observations commencing in July 1988, when the senior author visited his homeland. They document recent discoveries of both native and introduced species of aroids and attempt where possible to explain reasons for some of the introductions.
1993
16
37-46
Gitte Peterson Chromosome numbers of the genera Araceae (Buy)
 ABSTRACT: An overview of the chromosome numbers of the genera of Araceae is given.
1994
17
33-60
Thomas B. Croat Taxonomic status of neotropical aroids (Buy)
 ABSTRACT: While the Paleotropics has more genera than the Neotropics (60 versus 36) the latter area contains roughly twothirds the species of the world's Araceae. Our level of knowledge of the systematics of the neotropical Araceae varies greatly from area to area, owing largely to recent revisionary work or to the interest and area concentrated on by particular workers.
1995
18
21-23
Scott Zona Anthurium gymnopus in Cuba
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 ABSTRACT: Just west of Havana, near the town of Candelaria, in the province of Pinar del Rio, one can find Anthurium gymnopusGriseb., a curious and seldom-seen species endemic to western Cuba.
1995
18
24-27
Rick Cirino Aroids in Columbia (Buy)
 ABSTRACT: I had always wanted to go on a trip to Colombia, but I couldn't make it happen until May of 1994. With logistical help from some friends, I had drawn up an itinerary for a two week trip. My plan called for a flight into Cali, a drive up to the Choco via Risaralda, then a return to Cali where I would go to the areas west of the city.
1995
18
39
Jim Donovan Photograph: Anthurium veitchiiMasters growing in Joseph Fondeur's Tropical Paradise Nursery in Davie
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1995
18
46-148
Thomas B. Croat, Jimena Rodriguez de Salvador Contributions to the Araceae Flora in northwestern Pichincha Province (Buy Back Issue)
 ABSTRACT: This is the first in a planned series of local florulas leading to the complete revision of the Araceae for Ecuador. The ENDESA reserve, operated by the Universidad Catolica is located in central Ecuador in an area of Premontane rain forest. The flora, now known to have 76 species of Araceae is still poorly known except for Anthurium, the subject of this revision. Thirty-two species of Anthurium are treated. Ten new species and one new variety are described. New taxa are Anthurium balslevii Croat &J. Rodriguez, A. cabuyalense Croat & J. Rodriguez, A. cupulispathum Croat & J. Rodriguez, A. hebetatilaminum Croat &J. Rodriguez, A. jaramilloi Croat & J. Rodriguez, A. jimenae Croat, A. magnifolium Croat & J. Rodriguez, A. nigropunctatum Croat & J. Rodriguez, A. pulverulentum Sodiro var. adsimile Croat & J. Rodriguez, A. rodrigueziae Croat, and A. silanchense Croat & J. Rodriguez. One new combination is made, Anthurium propinquum Sodiro var. albispadix Croat & J. Rodriguez.
1997
20
29-36
Adelheid R. Kuehnle Progress in protoplast Isolation and culture from axenic tissues of hybrid Anthurium (Buy)
 ABSTRACT: Protoplasts capable of first divisions were isolated from Anthurium andraeanum Linden ex Andre hybrids using axenic etiolated shoots of the University of Hawaii Antburium cultivars 'Rudolph', UH1060, and UH1003. Enzymatic digestion by 1.5% (w/v) Cellulase R-lO, 0.5% Macerozyme R-10 and 0.5% Driselase in 0.5 M mannitol gave consistent yields between 1.6 X 104 to 2.2 X 104 protoplasts per gram fresh weight of etiolated shoots. In contrast, similar digestions using green leaves of micropropagated plantlets always resulted in mixtures of protoplasts and partially digested cells in ratios of about 1:1 to 1:3, respectively, with a mean yield of 3.8 X 105 protoplasts per gram fresh weight of leaves. Etiolated shoots exposed to a 14-day low light treatment gave consistently higher yields than those with no light exposure, with 3.8 X 104 and 1.8 X 104 protoplasts per gram fresh weight, respectively. Anthurium 'Rudolph' and UH1060 protoplasts were cultured in darkness at densities ranging from 2.5 X 104 to 7.0 X 104 protoplasts ml- ' in a basic tobacco protoplast culture medium with 1 mg' liter-l 6-benzylaminopurine, 1 mg·liter-' IX-naphthaleneacetic acid, and 0.1 mg·liter-' 2,4-dichlorophenoxyacetic acid either in liquid or embedded in 0.6% agarose. Antburium etiolated shoot protoplasts divided within 2 to 6 days and some sustained divisions to form microcolonies within 10 days under these conditions.
1998
21
26-145
Thomas B. Croat History and current status of systemic research with Araceae (Buy Back Issue)
 ABSTRACT: This paper will cover all systematic and floristic work that deals with Araceae which is known to me. It will not, in general, deal with agronomic papers on Araceae such as the rich literature on taro and its cultivation, nor will it deal with smaller papers of a technical nature or those dealing with pollination biology. It will include review papers on technical subjects and all works, regardless of their nature, of current aroid researchers. It is hoped that other reviews will be forthcoming which will cover separately the technical papers dealing with anatomy, cytology, physiology, palenology, and other similar areas and that still another review will be published on the subject of pollination biology of Araceae and the rich literature dealing with thermogenesis.
1999
22
48-61
Nuttha Kuanprasert, Adelheid R. Kuehnle Fragrance quality (Buy)
 ABSTRACT: A total of 146 Anthurium species and hybrids from sections Belolonchium, Calomystrium, Cardiolonchium, Chamaerepium, Dactylophyllum, Leptanthurium, Oxycarpium, Pachyneurium, Porphyrochitonium, Semaeophyllium, Tetraspermium and Urospadix was evaluated for floral fragrance. Type of fragrance, time of emission, daily occurrence and developmental stage of scent emission were recorded along with the color of spathe and spadix and the environmental conditions. A majority of plants emitted scent: 68% of the species and 80% of the hybrids were fragrant. Fragrance was categorized as citrus, fishy, floral, foul, fruity, menthol, minty, pine, spicy, and sweet. There was no correlation between scent production or quality with flower color or botanical section. A plurality of plants emitted scent during the morning only (45%) and at the pistillate stage (77%). Detection of fragrance depended upon ambient temperature and relative humidity. Fragrance life of unharvested inflorescences varied from 3 days up to 4 weeks, whereas that of harvested inflorescences was short, only 1 or 2 days. First generation progeny analyses from 22 crosses between non-fragrant and fragrant parents indicated that multiple genes likely govern the presence of scent in Anthurium.
2000
23
26-30
Thomas B. Croat, M. A. Pérez-Farrera A new record of Anthurium sarukhanianum (Araceae) to Chiapas (Buy)
 ABSTRACT: Antburium sarukhanianum Croat & Haager is recorded for Chiapas, Mexico. It is most closely related to A. balmoorei from west central Mexico but is similar to A. schlechtendalii. It differs from the former principally in the shape of its spadix and the petiole cross-sectional shape. It differs from A. scblecbtendalii by the shape of the spadix and spathe, by berry color and by the shape of the petiole and apex of blade. The record of A. sarukbanianum in Chiapas constitutes a considerable range extension from the only site previously known in the state of Guerrero in west central Mexico. Fruit color is reported for the A. sarukbanianum for the first time. The species produces yellow-orange berries similar to the yellow berries of A. balmoorei; another species in section Pacbyneurium from western Mexico.
2000
23
56-81
C.M. Sakuragui Araceae of campos (Buy)
 ABSTRACT: The campo rupestre vegetation is a montane, predominantly herbaceous plant formation that occurs mostly above 800 m. The Araceae, a family with greatest diversity in humid tropical forest habitats, has relatively few species in the Brazilian campos rupestres. However after an intensive fieldwork program a high proportion of species present were found to be new and endemic to the region. In the study ten species were recognized, one (Anthurium montezumense) being new to science. The species recognized are: Anthurium affine, Anthurium minarum, Anthurium montezumense, Anthurium mourae, Philodendron aeutatum, Philodendron adamantinum, Philodendron biribirense, Philodendron cipoense, Philodendron rhizomatosum and Philodendron uliginosum. The work has resulted in the production of keys to the genera and species, descriptions and commentary variously for the species.
2000
23
82-88
Marcus A. Nadruz Coelho Anthurium maricense Nadruz & Mayo--a new species of Anthurium Schott (Araceae: Tribe Anthurieae) for Brazil (Buy)
 ABSTRACT: A new psammophytic species of Anthurium (A. maricense) of Section Urospadix is described, endemic to the restinga vegetation of the coast of Rio de Janeiro state, Brazil; illustrations are provided.
2000
23
89-99
S. J. Mayo, L. P. Félix, J. G. Jardim, A. M. Carvalho Anthurium bromelicola--a remarkable new species from Northeast Brazil (Buy)
 ABSTRACT: Anthurium bromelicola is a new species from Northeast Brazil with two subspecies. It is unusual in its close association with bromeliad plants, its twining habit and very slender internodes; subsp. bromelicola, from the "agreste" region of the state of Pernambuco, is characterized by an erect, subcampanulate, dark spathe with a conspicuously costate inner surface and occurs with bromeliads on exposed rock outcrops; subsp. babiense, from the coastal restinga vegetation of the state of Bahia, has a more open, paler, non-costate spathe without differentiation into tube and blade, and occurs with terrestrial bromeliads on sandy substrates.
2001
24
6-12
Eduardo G. Gonçalves A new Anthurium (Araceae) from Serra do Cipó (Buy)
 ABSTRACT: A new species of Anthurium (A. megapetiolatum E.G.Gonc.) from Serra do Cipo, Minas Gerais state, Southeastern Brazil is described and illustrated. It belongs to the section Urospadix Engl. and is tentatively included in the subsection 1nsculptinervia Eng!. because of its adaxially sunken primary lateral veins. Anthurium megapetiolatum is compared to other species in the subsection 1nsculptinervia.
2001
24
13-17
Eduardo G. Gonçalves, E. R. Salviani Anthurium xanthophylloides G. M. Barroso (Araceae) Refound in Espírito Santo State (Buy)
 ABSTRACT: Anthurium xanthophylloides G. M. Barroso has been re-found in the wild for the first time since the type collection, in two different localities. An expanded description is presented, together with a detailed illustration. The species was initially considered as pertaining to section Cardiolonchium Schott, but it is now included in section Pachyneurium Schott here because of the involute ptyxis. Ecological and conservation remarks are provided.
2003
26
2-9
Thomas B. Croat, C. C. Finch New species of Anthurium (Araceae) from Colombia (Buy)
 ABSTRACT: Thirty-five years of collecting in Colombia has turned up many species new to science. The now more well-established of these are described for the first time here. Three species are described as new, Anthurium anchicayense Croat, Anthurium cogolloanum Croat & M. M. Mora, and Anthurium salgarense Croat.
2003
26
10-15
E. Melendez-Lopez, M. A. Pérez-Farrera, Thomas B. Croat Additional notes on Anthurium rionegrense Matuda: Morphology (Buy)
 ABSTRACT: The type locality of Anthurium rionegrense is rediscovered and additional information about its morphology, habitat and distribution is presented. This species is a rupiculous plant with a large branched stem. It ranges from 500 to 650 m elevation, occurring in deciduous and semideciduous tropical forests near the borders of the Mexican states of Chiapas and Oaxaca. A new collection locality is also presented.
2003
26
120-124
J. Ehrenberger, Adelheid R. Kuehnle Enhanced histological technique for observation of spathe pigmentation in Anthurium species and hybrids (Buy)
 ABSTRACT: A total of 12 Anthurium species and hybrids were examined histologically for pigmentation in spathes using a new method employing vacuum infiltration of spathe tissue with polyethylene glycol (PEG) priorto cross-sectioning. PEG infiltration displaces intercellular air spaces between cells. This method greatly improved the clarity of the cross sections and consequently improved observations of spatial localization of anthocyanins and chloroplasts.
2004
27
61-63
Thomas B. Croat, X. Cornejo New species of Anthurium from western Ecuador
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 ABSTRACT: Two species of Anthurium are described as new to science. The new species are A. churutense Croat & X. Cornejo and A. colonchense Croat & X. Cornejo, both members of Anthurium section Porphyrochionium.
2004
27
64-89
Thomas B. Croat, B. Oberle New species of Araceae from Colombia (Buy)
 ABSTRACT: The following taxa from the Colombia, mostly from the Department of Antioquia, are described as new to science: Anthurium acanthospadix Croat & Oberle, A. atramentarium Croat & Oberle, A. chrysolithos Croat & Oberle, A. hodgei Croat, Oberle & Mora, A. johnmackii Croat & Oberle, A. licium Croat & Oberle, A. macphersonii Croat & Oberle, A. modicum Croat & Oberle, A. silverstonei Croat & Oberle, A. soejartoi ssp. soejartoi Croat & Oberle, and A. soejartoi ssp. ascendens Croat & Oberle, A. subaequans Croat & Oberle, and Philodendron danielii Croat & Oberle.
2004
27
90-129
Thomas B. Croat, M. Marcela Mora New taxa of Araceae from Cabo Corrintes in Choco Department of Colombia (Buy)
 ABSTRACT: New species of Araceae are described from the Estacion Biological El Amargal and vicinity on Cabo Corrientes in Choco Department of Colombia. These are Anthurium acutibacca Croat & M. Mora, A. amargalense Croat & M. Mora, A. arusiense Croat & M. Mora, A. debilis Croat & Bay, A. eminens Schott, ssp. longispadix, Croat & M. Mora, A. galeanoae Croat & M. Mora, A. grandicataphyllum Croat & M. Mora, A. morae Croat, A. pallidicaudex Croat & M. Mora, A. promininerve Croat & M. Mora, A. variilobum Croat & M. Mora, Monstera amargalensis Croat & M. Mora, Philodendron amargalense Croat & M. Mora, P. laticiferum Croat & M. Mora, P. longipedunculatum, Croat & M. Mora, P. roseocataphyllum Croat & M. Mora, Rhodospatha monsalvae Croat & Bay and Xanthosoma daguense Engl. var. amargalense Croat & M. Mora.
2005
28
49-51
Thomas B. Croat, J. Chaparra A new endemic species of Anthurium (Araceae) from Brazil
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 ABSTRACT: Anthurium curicuriariense Croat is described as new. The new species is a member of section Calomystrium, and is a narrow endemic known only from Cerro Curicuriari in northern Amazonas Department of Brazil near the Rio Negro.
2005
28
52-64
Thomas B. Croat, Rick Cirino A review of the Anthurium splendidum complex (Araceae) (Buy)
 ABSTRACT: A revision is made of five closely related species in Anthurium section Cardiolonchium from Western Colombia. Anthurium splendidum Hort. ex W. Bull is reported to be rediscovered, since in its original description in 1883 no known province was cited. One member of this complex, A. debilis Croat & Bay, was recently published. Three additional new species closely related to, or previously confused with A. splendidum, are described. These are A. giraldoi Croat, A. luxurians Croat & Cirino, and A. nutibarense Croat.
2005
28
65-68
Marcus A. Nadruz Coelho, Thomas B. Croat A new species of Anthurium from Brazil (Buy)
 ABSTRACT: A new species of Anthurium is described. The new species is Anthurium santaritensis Nadruz & Croat, belonging to section Pachyneurium. It is endemic to the Brazilian State of Minas Gerais, and is compared with Anthurium solitarium Schott.
2005
28
69-80
Thomas B. Croat, J. S. Lingán Chávez Rediscovery of rare species of Anthurium (Araceae) from Peru (Buy)
 ABSTRACT: In this paper five rare species of Anthurium are redescribed: A. consimile Schott, A. corallinum Poepp. et Endl., A. gracilipedunculatum Krause, A. huanucense Engler, and A. peltatum Poepp.
2005
28
81-85
J. Jacome, Thomas B. Croat Rediscovery of Anthurium gustavii Regel and Anthurium metallicum Linden ex Schott (Araceae) in Columbia (Buy)
 ABSTRACT: Anthurium gustavii Regel and A. metallicum Linden ex Schott, both previously poorly known taxonomically and phytogeographically, are redescribed based on new information.
2006
29
86-90
Thomas B. Croat, David Scherberich, Genevieve Ferry A new species of Anthurium (Araceae) from Loreto (Buy)
 ABSTRACT: Anthurium barrieri, a new species of section Leptanthurium is described as new. The species, closely related to A. gracile (Rudge) Schott, is only the second species described for section Leptanthurium. It is distinguished from A. gracile by its erect inflorescences, yellowish spadices with more flowers per spiral, larger lobed flowers, proportionately broader leaf blades and sulcate petioles.
2006
29
91-103
Marcus A. Nadruz Coelho A new species of Anthurium (Araceae) from Brazil (Buy)
 ABSTRACT: Seven new species are described from the southeast region of Brazil. Six species are endemic: two to the state of Espirito Santo (A. boudetii and A. Jragae), two to the state of Rio de Janeiro (A. bragae and A. simonii) and two to the state of Sao Paulo (A. victorii and A. unense). The species distributed in more than one state is A. gomesianum in Minas Gerais and Espfrito Santo. All the species belong to the section Urospadix, subsection Flavescentiviridia, and found in the Atlantic Forest. Descriptions, illustrations and comments on geographical distribution, ecology, phenology and conservation status are provided for each species.
2006
29
Inside back cover
Thomas B. Croat Corrections in publication: Anthurium nutubarense
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2007
30
19-22
Thomas B. Croat, J. José Castillo Mont, Jay Vannini A new endemic species of Anthurium sect. Pachyneurium (Araceae) for Guatemala (Buy)
 ABSTRACT: A new endemic species of Anthurium section Pachyneurium , newly discovered in Guatemala, is compared with other species in the section. The species is unique among all Anthurium section Pachyneurium in having green berries.
2007
30
23-37
Thomas B. Croat, Jane Whitehill, Emily D. Yates A new subsection of Anthurium section Calomystrium (Araceae) and five new species from Columbia and Ecuador (Buy)
 ABSTRACT: Subsection Rupicola, a new subsection of Anthurium section Calomystrium is proposed, encompassing nine rupicolous species. Descriptions and a key are provided for these species including: A. antrophyoides Killip, from Ecuador and Colombia, A. chocoense Croat and A. antioquiense Engler from Colombia, as well as A. amnicola Dressler, and A. sytsmae Croat from Panama. Five species, A. palacioanum Croat and A. weiffii Croat from Ecuador, and A. chocoense Croat, A. callejasii Croat, and A. vanderknaapii Croat, from Colombia, are described as new. Members of this group were previously thought to belong in section Porphyrochitonium because of their generally lanceolate leaf blades, and stems with short internodes. However, lack of distinct glandular punctations on blade surfaces and the ability to interbreed readily with other members of section Calomystrium indicate that this new group belongs in section Calomystrium, and has evolved without conspicuous posterior lobes typical of section Calomystrium, owing to their rupicolous habitat.
2008
31
25-42
Thomas B. Croat, David Wolfersberger, Carla V. Kostelac New species of Araceae from Western Ecuador (Buy)
 ABSTRACT: Nine new species of Anthurium (Araceae) are described and illustrated: Anthurium alluriquinense Croat, A. fosteri Croat, A. iltisii Croat, A. lojtnantii Croat, A. pescadilloense Croat, A. pucayacuense Croat, A. samamaense Croat, A. sebastianense Croat and A. ventanasense.
2008
31
43-56
Thomas B. Croat, X. Delannay, Carla V. Kostelac New species of Araceae from Ecuadorian Amazonia (Buy)
 ABSTRACT: Six new species of Araceae from the Amazon basin in Ecuador are described as new to science, Anthurium chacoense Croat, A. cuyabenoense Croat, A. dolichocnemum Croat, A. effusispathum Croat, A. ionanthum Croat and A. longiusculus Croat.
2008
31
57-84
Thomas B. Croat, L. Brossart, Carla V. Kostelac A revision of the 3-segmented species of Anthurium Sect. Dactylophyllium (Araceae) (Buy)
 ABSTRACT: Anthurium sect. Dactylophyllium have leaf blades palmately divided into segments divided to the base and and may have 0-) 3-15 segments. Those species with 3 or fewer segments are revised here and a key is provided. Anthurium arisaemoides, A. cutucuense, A. huacamayoense, A. moonenii, A. thrinax, A. triphyllum, A. trisectum, A. warintsense and A. zuloagae.
2009
32
30-122
Thomas B. Croat, Pu Huang, J. Lake, Carla V. Kostelac Araceae of the flora of Reserva La Planada, Nariño Department, Colombia (Part 1) (Buy Back Issue)
2009
32
165-169
Myles Challis In search of Eldorado (Buy)
2009
32
170-177
Steve Lucas A collector's dream to build a rain forest (Buy)
2009
32
178-182
Leland Miyano Lessons from a paradise (Buy)