Your search for articles mentioning the genus Urospatha has found 14 articles.

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Simon J. Mayo Aroid-hunting in Bahai (Buy)
 ABSTRACT: Despite having been the first area of Brazil to be colonized by the Portuguese, the north-eastern state of Bahia is still poorly-known botanically, particularly in its dry interior region. All the indications are, however, that the flora is very rich, and this applies to the aroids as well as to many other families of plants. Consequently, when in the first three months of 1977 I took part in a Kew expedition to Bahia led by Dr. Raymond Harley, I was particularly keen to refind the many poorly-known Araceae recorded from this region.
Michael Madison The genera of Araceae in the northern Andes (Buy)
 ABSTRACT: The north Andean region, which includes Colombia, Ecuador, and Peru, has perhaps the richest flora in the world and is the center of diversity of the family Araceae. The low to middle elevation wet forests of the area abound with aroids which cover the ground, climb up tree trunks, and as epiphytes adorn the outer branches of the trees. Many of our finest ornamental aroids, including Anthurium andreanum, A. crystallinum, Caladium bicolor, and Philodendron erubescens, are derived from this area. The purpose of this paper is to provide a key and brief descriptions of the genera of Araceae of the northern Andes which should enable anyone to identify to genus aroids from the region. The key is also applicable in Central America, but only partly so in the rest of South America where a number of additional genera, principally of the subfamily Aroideae, are found.
Michael Madison Protection of developing seeds in neotropical Araceae (Buy)
 ABSTRACT: In flowering plants with animal pollination and seed dispersal the reproductive cycle can be considered to consist of four stages, representing alternating phases of protection and display. In the protective phases immature flowers and fruits are safeguarded from predation and parasitism, while in the display phases pollinators and dispersal vectors are attracted. This alternation of protection and display is accomplished by a variety of mechanisms.
Michael Madison Notes on some aroids along the Rio Negro (Buy)
 ABSTRACT: In the fall of 1978 I spent several months collecting plants along the Rio Negro in the western Amazon in connection with the Projecto Flora Amazonas, an ambitious undertaking to prepare a new flora of the Amazon. Although my chief research interests on this expedition were not directed to aroids, I was able to make observations and collections of a number of species.
Michael H. Grayum The aroid flora of Finca La Selva (Buy)
 ABSTRACT: Costa Rica is a small Central American nation about the size of Denmark, with a remakable array of climatic regimes, and altitudes ranging from sea level to nearly four thousand meters. One can ascend from semidesert scrub forests on the Pacific slope, up through sodden cloud forests to pa'ramo (a kind of a high altitude chaparral) on the highest peaks, and down again on the Caribbean slope, through alders, elms and oaks, to humid lowlands and rain forests. The plants growing in this multifaceted domain are incredibly diverse, even by tropical standards. Costa Rica boasts nearly twenty-five percent more species of dicots, for example, than the lush tropical isle of Java, and nearly two and a half times as many species of dicot epiphytes (Burger, 1980) - this despite the fact that Java is two and a half times larger than Costa Rica and has yielded fifty percent more herbarium specimens per unit area (Prance., 1978).
Dan H. Nicholson Translation of Engler's classification of Araceae with updating (Buy)
 ABSTRACT: When Hooker (1883) was preparing the treatment of Araceae (Aroideae) for the monumental 'Genera Plantarum,' he basically followed the Schottian system, incorporating Engler's (1879) reduction in the number of genera. The first system was "popularized" by Hutchinson (1959) who, with a reversal of the sequence (bisexual genera first), published essentially an English translation of Hooker's latin. Engler (1905-1920), in his monumental 'Das Pflanzenreich', produced his final treatment of the family, including all then known species in nine volumes. This work remains the standard reference for the family as a whole.
Thomas B. Croat, Nancy Lambert The Araceae of Venezuela (Buy Back Issue)
 ABSTRACT: An illustrated treatment of 171 Venezuelan Araceae taxa is provided. Discussion of range, species characteristics and distinction from similar or closely related species is made for each taxon. Sixteen species, three subspecies and one variety are described as new, and three new combinations are made.
Josef Bogner Morphological variation in aroids (Buy)
 ABSTRACT: The Araceae or aroid., are a large family of about 2400 species, grouped in 107 genera and these again in nine subfamilies. The aroids are mainly a tropical family and are distributed world-wide. They show great variation in their morphological characters, which will be described in this paper along with some other data.
Thomas B. Croat Ecology and life forms of Araceae (Buy Back Issue)
 ABSTRACT: The most interesting aspect of the family's ecology is the diversity of adaptive life forms. These range from submerged to free-floating, and emergent aquatics to terrestrial plants and to epilithic or epiphytic forms which may be true epiphytes or hemiepiphytic (growing on trees but rooted in soil). Hemiepiphytism is diverse itself, with some species beginning their lives as terrestrial seedlings, then growing skototropically (toward darkness) until they arrive at the nearest suitable tree ( usually a relatively large one which casts a darker shadow) where a physiological change takes place allowing them to grow toward light (Strong & Ray, 1975). They grow as appressed epiphytes on trees or as vines in the canopy. Others begin their lives as true epiphytes, some reconverting to hemiepiphytes by producing long, dangling roots contacting the forest floor below.
Julius O. Boos Experiencing Urospathas (Buy)
 ABSTRACT: Urospatha, with their magnificent, large sagittate leaves with purple and green patterned petioles and elongated spathes in muted colors of bronze and ivory elegantly twisted at their tips, possess a somber beauty you may find hard to ignore or resist.
Gitte Peterson Chromosome numbers of the genera Araceae (Buy)
 ABSTRACT: An overview of the chromosome numbers of the genera of Araceae is given.
Julius O. Boos Observations on New World Araceae--Lasieae (Buy)
 ABSTRACT: Three neotropical Lasioids were cultivated and studied over a period of years. Observations were made which add to our knowledge of these poorly studied plants, some previously known only from a few herbarium specimens. Further research is urgently needed both in the lab and field as continuing deforestation seriously threatens the survival of several species in the wild. In addition, the culture of these semi-aquatic plants has proven difficult, and their survival in most collections is normally very short term. Methods for their successful cultivation have been outlined (Boos, 1993) and research continues to improve their long term survival. The genus Urospatba is in urgent need of revision. Two of the three described species of Anapbyllopsis are known only from a Single herbarium sheet.
Thomas B. Croat History and current status of systemic research with Araceae (Buy Back Issue)
 ABSTRACT: This paper will cover all systematic and floristic work that deals with Araceae which is known to me. It will not, in general, deal with agronomic papers on Araceae such as the rich literature on taro and its cultivation, nor will it deal with smaller papers of a technical nature or those dealing with pollination biology. It will include review papers on technical subjects and all works, regardless of their nature, of current aroid researchers. It is hoped that other reviews will be forthcoming which will cover separately the technical papers dealing with anatomy, cytology, physiology, palenology, and other similar areas and that still another review will be published on the subject of pollination biology of Araceae and the rich literature dealing with thermogenesis.
Julius O. Boos Growing aroids from seed: Urospatha and other Lasieae
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 ABSTRACT: Many aroiders have questions about the best way to grow aroids from seed. A simple question, but like most simple and quick requests, the answer is far from short and easy. Since a number of articles relating to other methods of propagation had been submitted for this issue, it seemed to be a good idea to round these out by inviting contributions from some of the most active members of the society. These were the responses, sometimes going further than the practical by reminding us of the importance of increasing and spreading aroids in collections since so much of their habitat is being lost.