IAS Aroid Quasi Forum

About Aroid-L
 This is a continuously updated archive of the Aroid-L mailing list in a forum format - not an actual Forum. If you want to post, you will still need to register for the Aroid-L mailing list and send your postings by e-mail for moderation in the normal way.

  Amorphophallus myosuroides
From: ironious2 at yahoo.com (E Morano) on 2008.02.01 at 21:02:01(17017)
Hi, I just got several little tiny Amorphophallus myosuroides offsets. They are about the size of small rat turds. Sorry about the comparison but thats what they look like. Anyway, my question is, are the supposed to be this small? I know they are small but I didnt think they were this small. Also what are the care instructions? Please let me know. Thanks.

---------------------------------
Looking for last minute shopping deals? Find them fast with Yahoo! Search.

+More
From: hetter at xs4all.nl (Wilbert Hetterscheid) on 2008.02.01 at 21:54:05(17020)
They are indeed small and should be small. Depending on how long they ahve
been resting (say 3-4 months max) you might want to put them in soil, keep
moderately moist and they'll emerge. The mature tuber/rhizome doesn't get
any bigger than some 1.5 - 2 cm and produces masses of these tiny offsets,
once you have it well-esteblished. If you are a member of the IAS you could
have noticed this species in Aroideana 29 (2006) on pages 65 - 67.

Cheerio,
Wilbert

+More
From: "Wilbert Hetterscheid" <hetter at xs4all.nl> on 2008.09.09 at 23:10:42(18477)
Erin,

Am. myosuroides is a member of a recently disvovered new group in
Amorphophallus (incl. also Am. ongsakulii and a new one to be described).
These have a very different growth cycle from "normal" Amorphs. The plants
will develop several leaves during one season and may start flowering
after a few months, alongside the leaves and then they may even produce
more flowers in one season. VERY un-Amorphophallus but there it is.

In my collection myosuroides is now also going dormant and even though the
leaves are dying down, it is still producing flowers so it is perfectly
healthy. Maybe the bud at the base of the dying leaf is a flower. I don't
think there's anything to worry about. Just water less and let the plants
go dormant. Maybe the flower will still develop on its own, fed by the
reserves in the tuber. Keep the tubers dry during dormancy and you'll have
several hundreds of them in a short while.

Maybe Alan Galloway (the discoverer of this group) has additional
experience to tell us.

Cheers,
WIlbert

+More
From: "E.Vincent Morano" <ironious2 at yahoo.com> on 2008.09.09 at 23:55:10(18479)
Wow thank you Wilbert. Very interesting indeed. Im always grateful to get a reply from the guy at the top of the ladder. I just discovered aroids this year and I am in love. Perhaps Mr.Galloway will have some helpful info to add if you have not said it all already.
Best Wishes,
Erin
HTML

+More

From: "Alan Galloway" <alan_galloway at bellsouth.net> on 2008.09.10 at 08:30:51(18489)
Erin and others that might be growing Am. myosuroides and Am. ongsakulii...

Both these species tend to send up multiple leaves as well as multiple flowers
during the growing season. Also both these species tend to produce anywhere
from 7 to 14 offsets during the growing season. Towards the end of the growing
season the offsets begin to send up leaves that can be almost as large as the
parent tuber's leaf. This aspect of leaf growth (parent tuber's leaf going
dormant, and
offset's new leaf emerging) makes it somewhat difficult to determine if the
plant
is going dormant or starting an immediate second growth cycle.

If you continue to keep the pot moist, the offsets will continue to grow. I've
been
growing these 2 species for 5 years and I stop watering them about now and force
them to go dormant. I've never experimented with watering them throughout the
year,
so I don't know if continuous watering would put them in the 'pseudo-evergreen'
category.

Alan

+More
From: "mossytrail" <mossytrail at hctc.com> on 2008.09.10 at 15:17:34(18495)
> Am. myosuroides is a member of a recently disvovered new
> group in Amorphophallus (incl. also Am. ongsakulii and a
> new one to be described). These have a very different
> growth cycle from "normal" Amorphs. The plants will
> develop several leaves during one season and may start
> flowering after a few months, alongside the leaves and
> then they may even produce more flowers in one season.
> VERY un-Amorphophallus but there it is.
>
Some "splitters" would say that makes it some other genus.
Wonder what they'll name it...? (I suggest
Hetterscheidiphallus...hee-hee.)

+More
From: "Wilbert Hetterscheid" <hetter at xs4all.nl> on 2008.09.12 at 00:34:53(18501)
Hetterscheidiphallus? But these are TINY species, dear Jason........tiny!!!!

> -----Oorspronkelijk bericht-----
> Van: aroid-l-bounces@gizmoworks.com

+More
Note: this is a very old post, so no reply function is available.