Amorphophallus konjac 'Shattered Glass'

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Origin

The Originator

Michael Marcotrigiano, Massachusetts, USA (inventgardens@gmail.com)

The Namer

Michael Marcotrigiano, Massachusetts, USA (inventgardens@gmail.com)

Parentage

spontaneous mutation isolated from micropropagated plants

Date

Found in the mid 1990's and first offered to the public about 3 years later on an internet auction site.

Name Derivation

The name ‘Shattered Glass’ should apply only to variegated offsets and any all green offsets should be discarded as they are essentially wild-type.The cultivar name reflects the random and chaotic nature of the leaf variegation as in panes of shattered glass, where no two pieces are alike.

Description

Habit

Growth habit not different than a typical wild-type plant of A. konjac. ‘Shattered Glass’ is a highly variable somewhat unstable variegated clone that can be maintained with careful selection and by retaining several progeny. Because of its instability, it is not a plant that can be mass-produced by commerce. It is a unique collector’s item. It is highly unstable in micropropagation like most chimeras. The cause of variegation in 'Shattered Glass' has not been scientifically determined but it appears similar to other variegated plants where there is a mix of defective and normal chloroplasts. It can be difficult to grow in hot climates especially if given too much light. The color of the light tissue can begin creamy yellow in the spring and convert to white with time. It appears that temperature has an effect on the color quality. With too much light, white areas can burn (probably this does not hurt the health of the developing corm since white tissue produced no carbohydrate). Yet, if you overprotect it and give it too much shade, it can produce a smaller replacement corm, therefore, a smaller leaf, and less offspring in the future. Once you master the growing of this clone, the plants can reach normal size, given more time. I have produced plants with a leaf over a meter across that are evenly variegated and stunning.

Leaf

Variegation among vegetative offsets can be variable with unique patterns of green and white, some mottled, some sectored. Some offsets can be totally albino (and die once their carbohydrate reserves are drained - see albino in image) and some can be green, never to be variegated again. Most offsets will be variegated to some extent and if selection is made for those with some white tissue in most parts of the leaf then the offsets from those plants have a higher probability of producing many nicely variegated offsets. Interestingly, the petiole can also display streaks, and these streaks of lighter tissue are often connected to large sectors of white leaf tissue. The spathe is also variegated but not white and green. It is maroon and light maroon. The best propagation results are obtained if the plants that have a 50:50 mix of white and green tissue around the entire leaf are used as stock plants. If plants with largely white leaves are saved, the corm the following year may be greatly reduced in size. The white tissue appears to impact cell division and/or expansion as some leaf distortion is evident when closely inspected. If he white tissue has green tissue above it, emerald green to grey sectors are present. No two plants are the same and an individual plant will not necessarily produce a similar leaf the next season. On rare occasion, a beautifully variegated plant will give rise to a green leaf the following year. The color of the light tissue can begin creamy yellow in the spring and convert to pure white with time. It appears that temperature has an effect on the color quality. With too much light, white areas can burn (probably this does not hurt the health of the developing corm since white tissue produced no carbohydrate). Yet, if you overprotect it and give it too much shade, it can produce a smaller replacement corm, therefore, a smaller leaf, and less offspring in the future. Once you master the growing of this clone, the plants can reach normal size given more time. I have produced plants with a leaf over a meter across that are evenly variegated.

Flower and Fruit

Spathe can be variegated but not with white. It can be blotchy pink with darker purple regions. It is maroon and light maroon. Some fruit are also variegated with stripes. Only once did I attempt to germinate these and they resulted in largely white seedlings that died (see image).

Unique Characteristics

Beautiful variegation of the leaf.


Photos

Include photos of plant habit, inflorescence, leaf detail, fruit, etc. [[File:|thumb|none]]