Your search for articles published in volume 34 has found 19 articles.

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Year
Vol.
(Issue)
Pages
Author(s)
Title
2011
34
3-23
Eduardo G. Gonçalves The Commonly Cultivated Species of Xanthosoma Schott (Araceae), including Four New Species (Buy)
 ABSTRACT: The genus Xanthosoma Schott is widely cultivated in the tropics, but very little is known about its taxonomy, especially concerning the cultivated species. This article presents a key for determination, as well as morphological descriptions and additional information about 14 forms/ species of commonly cultivated Xanthosoma, including four new species. The species surveyed (and described) are: X. appendiculatum Schott, X. atrovirens C.Koch & Bouche, X. aureum E.G.Gon~., X. blandum Schott, X. brasiliense (Desf.) Eng!., X. mafaffa Schott, X. mafaffa Schott "lineolatum", X. monstruosum E.G.Gon~., X. panduriforme E.G.Gon~., X. riedelianum (Schott) Schott, X. robustum Schott, X. sagittifolium (1.) Schott, X. taioba E.G.Gon~. and X. violaceum Schott, all of them illustrated with pictures.
2011
34
24-29
Baharuddin Sulaiman, Peter C. Boyce Studies on Homalomeneae (Araceae) of Peninsular Malaysia V: Homalomena wallichii, Refound after over 190 Years (Buy)
 ABSTRACT: Homalomena wallichi, collected just once since 1822 has long languished in taxonomic obscurity. It has recently been refound in the wild after more than 190 years and is here reinstated as a taxonomically sound species and as endemic to Peninsular Malaysia. Images of Wallich's original collection, and of the living plant in flower, are provided.
2011
34
30-36
Agung Kurniawan, Ni Putu Sri Asih, Bayu Adjie, Peter C. Boyce Studies on Homalomeneae (Araceae) of Borneo IX: A New Species of Homalomena Supergroup Chamaecladon from Kalimantan Timur, Indonesian Borneo (Buy)
 ABSTRACT: Homalomena agens is described and illustrated as a new species of the Chamaecladon Supergroup from Kalimantan Timur, Indonesian Borneo. A brief overview of the recent publication history of Homalamena in the humid Asian tropics, together with a review of the taxonomy of the Chamaecladon Supergroup in Borneo, and a key to described species in Borneo, is provided.
2011
34
37-44
Thomas B. Croat, Lille Marleen Calderon, Carla V. Kostelac New Species of Anthurium (Araceae) from Ecuador (Buy)
 ABSTRACT: Three species of Anthurium (Araceae) are described as new to science; Anthurium boosianum Croat, A. genferryae Croat and A. marleenianum Croat.
2011
34
45-63
Thomas B. Croat, Keith Lee, Whitney Wodstrchill, Carla V. Kostelac New Species of Anthurium (Araceae) from South America (Buy)
 ABSTRACT: Eleven new species of Anthurium (Araceae) are described as new: Anthurium apiaense Croat, A. aylwardianum Croat, A. benktsparrei Croat, A. bicordoense Croat, A. diversicaudex Croat, A. mapiriense Croat, A. molaui Croat, A. porcesitoense Croat, A. punkuyocense Croat, A. riojaense Croat, and A. straminopetiolum Croat. All are members of section Cardiolonchium, except two of the species, A. bicordoense and A. porcesitoense, which are members of section Xialophyllum. Five of the new species are from Peru but A. apiaense, A. bicordoense and A. porcesitoense are from Colombia and A. benktsparrei, A. diversicaudex and A. molaui from Ecuador.
2011
34
64-65
Eduardo G. Gonçalves A New Species of Anthurium (Araceae) from Parana State, Southern Brazil
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 ABSTRACT: A new species of Anthurium (Anthurium hatschbachii E.G.Gon<;,:.) from Parana state, southern Brazil is here described and compared with its closest relative (Anthurium lhotskyanum Schott). This new species is so far known only from the type locality.
2011
34
66-69
E. C. Morgan, Jon A. Borysiewicz, Ramiro Rios Z. Preliminary Analysis of the Relationship between Canopy Leaf Area Index and Genera of Araceae in an Amazonian Lowland Rainforest (Buy)
 ABSTRACT: Through the use of a hemispherical canopy analyzer, a preliminary analysis of the relationship between Leaf Area Index (LAI) and the richness and abundance of terrestrial Araceae in the understory was examined. Trends between the value of leaf area index and the number of individuals at both the family and generic level were identified, demonstrating the need for a more intricate investigation into the relationship between light penetration and terrestrial Araceae.
2011
34
70-83
Marc Gibernau Pollinators and Visitors of Aroid Inflorescences: an addendum (Buy)
 ABSTRACT: Data on aroid pollinators or inflorescence visitors were reviewed lately by Gibernau (2003), documenting the pollinators of 49 genera and about 125 species. This addendum adds information on 35 genera, of which 9 are newly documented, and about 60 species. In summary, we have some information on pollinators or inflorescence visitors on 58 genera and about 165 species. Such numbers are very low in comparison of the family diversity (more than 110 genera and about 4,000 species). The pollination of entire groups of Araceae is still unknown. The knowledge on the pollination of each tribe is discussed.
2011
34
84-85
Marc Gibernau, Derek Burch Planning Pollination Experiments
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 ABSTRACT: In the last few years, the first author has been contacted several times by aroiders, colleagues or students interested in studying the pollination ecology of an Aroid species, in the field or in garden conditions. According to their request, the best experimental design adapted to answer their question was proposed. Of course, many experimental designs associated with pollination exist. In the following article, we present different simple and useful experiments classified according to their time investment
2011
34
86-89
B. VimaIa Flowering and Seed Set in Giant Taro (Alocasia macrorrhizos (L.) G. Don f.) (Buy)
 ABSTRACT: In Alocasia macrorrhizos flowering is very rare. This paper gives the details of flowering and fruit set observed in one accession of giant taro: six fruit bunches were harvested. The number of berries/ fruit bunch varied from 45 to 173 and number of seeds/berry ranged from 47 to 246. The number of seeds/berry varied between 1 and 4. A total of 618 seeds were observed in 488 berries from six fruit bunches. This is the first report of seed set in giant taro under natural conditions.
2011
34
90-92
Greg Ruckert What's a Gardener to Do? Some of the Questions that Lie behind Writing a plant Label
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 ABSTRACT: To the amateur plantsman it is important that the name on a tag in a pot, is the correct name for that plant. It can be devastating (or sometimes exciting), when a plant flowers, to find that it is not what was expected. When we make a label for a plant we generally record the genus, species and if necessary the subspecies, variety or form. Rarely do we investigate the original correctness of the name, we accept that the source from whom the plant was obtained knew what they were doing.
2011
34
93-95
Peter C. Boyce The Quest for Understanding - Just What Makes it a 'New' Species?
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 ABSTRACT: An overview of some of the skills, experience and thought processes involved in undertaking taxonomic and nomenclatural research is provided
2011
34
96-97
LariAnn Garner Notes on the Culture of Philodendron saxicola
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 ABSTRACT: Philodendron saxicola is a terrestrial plant, found in habitat growing on exposed conglomerate sandstone outcrops. The plant is found natively in the state of Bahia, Brazil, and is relatively rare in habitat, while being extremely rare in cultivation. This rarity is one of the reasons why I was so interested in obtaining seeds and working out a protocol for the successful cultivation of this plant.
2011
34
98-101
LariAnn Garner Cold Damage: Chilling Injury and Freeze Injury (Buy)
 ABSTRACT: After a warm and productive summer of tropical plant growing, the one event that can bring on heart palpitations is the first day when I hear on the weather report that the temperature is headed below 50 degrees F. I get nervous because tropical plants adapted to warm summer conditions are going to be in for a shock when hit with such chilly temperatures. I've actually seen more damage on some plants from the abrupt transition from warm to cold in Autumn than from cool to cold in Winter. Below I will discuss the importance of, and the difference between, chilling injury and freezing injury. What follows will be in the context of tropical plants, and more specifically, the aroids that I grow.
2011
34
102-105
Enid Offolter For the Love of Anthuriums (Buy)
 ABSTRACT: We have been plant collectors for a number of years, and our nursery is dedicated to bringing the odd, unusual, rare, exotic or seemingly unobtainable to you, our fellow collector. Anthuriums have long been one of our favorites but we have killed our share (I suspect a few suicides) in learning how to keep up with hundreds of species and a few hybrids in production. There are complexities and special needs, but many share some simple requirements and will do well when these are met.
2011
34
106-117
Denis Carey, Tony Avent Cool Colocasias--Elephant Ears for the Garden (Buy)
 ABSTRACT: Colocasias are known in the western world by three common names; taro, dasheen and the descriptive anatomical name, elephant ear. There are dozens of names used in other parts of the world including culcas (from which the genus name colocasia is derived), eddo, imo, cocoyam and malombo. Colocasias have a worldwide distribution and are grown in tropical and sub-tropical countries as a vital staple food crop and fodder crop. Colocasia esculenta is the 14th most widely consumed vegetable on earth. Ornamental colocasias (the focus of this article) are important plants in gardens because they add a bold, tropical look.
2011
34
118-120
Brian Williams A New Breed
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 ABSTRACT: Breeding plants has become a passion of mine. It was not always so. There was a time when I had no idea what breeding plants meant. I had seen hybrids in my friend's collections but generating them seemed complicated and time consuming. Who was I to change nature and for what reasons?
2011
34
121-122
Brian Williams Nature's Mix Made Better
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 ABSTRACT: There is a huge "green" movement going on, and I am not sure what I really think of this. Sure I believe in helping nature, and keeping the environment clean but at what cost can we bear? These things worry me. Recycling is good and so is doing my part in what I feel is right, but I find that what has motivated me most to be green is another green substance called money.
2011
34
123-128
Eduardo G. Gonçalves, Pedro Lage Viana, Jose Andre Verneck Monteiro, Wallace Borba Leal, Adriel Nogueira Dias, Rubens Mota Custodio Flowering Amorphophallus titanum (Araceae) at Inhotim Botanical Garden - The First Blooming Event of this Species in Latin America (Buy)
 ABSTRACT: The Asian species Amorphophallus titanum (Becc.) Becc. ex Arcang. can be considered one of the most spectacular flowering species ever cultivated and it is considered a real treasure for any Botanic Garden. Since its discovery in 1879, it has flowered approximately one hundred times in conservatories, but almost exclusively in Europe, North America and Asia. In December 2010, a ten years old (and 13 kg) tuber of Amorphophallus titanum flowered for the flrst time in Latin America, at the recently founded Jardim Botanico Inhotim. The inflorescence reached 1.78 m tall and the blooming event attracted approximately 1,500 people. The objective of this article is to describe the first flowering of this amazing species in Latin America and comment its social impact locally.