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Year
Vol.
(Issue)
Pages
Author(s)
Title
2012
35
3-23
Peter C. Boyce,   The Araceae of Indomalaya I: Piptospatha N.E.Br. (Buy)
 ABSTRACT: A review of the genus Piptospatha N.E.Br. is presented with new generic boundaries implemented since the last full revision. 10 species are recognized, two of them (P. marginata (Engl.) N.E.Br. & P. repens H.Okada & Tsukaya) recognized only recently as distinct species. Two species (P. angustifolia Engl. ex Alderw. and P. remiformis Ridl.) are treated as inadequately known. A key to accepted species is given, and all species are illustrated, the majority from living plants.
2012
35
24-28
Peter C. Boyce,   Studies on Schismatoglottideae (Araceae) of Borneo XVIII: Additional observations on Schottariella mirifica (Buy)
 ABSTRACT: Schottariella mirifica, the sole species of a Bornean endemic genus, is known from four localities on the Kanowit and Ai river catchments of western Sarawak, Malaysian Borneo. Based on recent fieldwork we here present expanded ecological information, and new morphological data, including descriptions and illustrations of the previously unknown mature infructescence.
2012
35
29-34
Thomas B. Croat,  , Genevieve Ferry, M. Marcela Mora Two new species of Philodendron (Araceae) from Amazonian Peru (Buy)
 ABSTRACT: Two new species of Philodendron, P. bicolor and P. pierrelianum (Araceae) are described and illustrated.
2012
35
35-39
Eduardo G. Gonçalves, Antonio Henrique dos Santos, Paul Richard Momsen Miller A new combination for a Brazilian aroid. (Buy)
 ABSTRACT: The species originally described as Caladium poecile Schott (Araceae) is here proposed as belonging to the genus Xanthosoma, as X. poecile (Schott) E.G. Gonc¸.. This new combination is based on pollen grains (shed in tetrads), together with molecular results. This is the third species of Xanthosoma known to have peltate leaves.
2012
35
40-46
Wilbert L. A. Hetterscheid, Cyrille Claudel The End Of Pseudodracontium N.E. Br. (Buy)
 ABSTRACT: The aroid genus Pseudodracontium N.E. Br. is reduced to Amorphophallus Bl. ex Decne. New names and a new key to taxa of the former Pseudodracontium are presented. A discussion on its phylogenetic position within Amorphophallus is given.
2012
35
47-50
Wilbert L. A. Hetterscheid, Cyrille Claudel A new miniature Amorphophallus (Araceae) from Eastern Thailand (Buy)
 ABSTRACT: The new species Amorphophallus terrestris Hett. & C. Claudel is described and compared to its phylogenetically closest relatives.
2012
35
51-64
Alan Galloway New Araceae species from Laos and Thailand (Buy)
 ABSTRACT: Five new species of the genus Amorphophallus and three new species of the genus Typhonium from Laos and Thailand are described based on material in the existing living collection of the author. The similarities of these new species, compared to existing species, are discussed.
2012
35
65-71
Thomas B. Croat, James J. Grib, Carla V. Kostelac New Species of Philodendron (Araceae) in the Guianas (Buy)
 ABSTRACT: Three new species of Philodendron (Araceae) are described and illustrated from the Guianas including, P. ayangannense Croat and P. kaieteurense Croat that are from Guyana and P. pokigronense Croat that is from Suriname.
2012
35
72-79
Thomas B. Croat, Noel Altamirano, Ann Grace, Carla V. Kostelac New species of Araceae from the South American Andes (Buy)
 ABSTRACT: Four new species are described as new to science: Anthurium mateoi Croat & Altamirano, A. monteagudoi Croat & Altamirano, A. rodvasquezii Croat and A. valenzuelae Croat & Altamirano (Cuzco Department, Peru).
2012
35
80
Thomas B. Croat New name for Anthurium mapiriense Croat sect. Xialophyllium.
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 ABSTRACT: A new name is proposed for an illegitimately published name. Anthurium mapiriense Croat in sect. Xialophyllium becomes A. chequitavense Croat.
2012
35
81-85
Cyrille Claudel, Ralph D. Mangelsdorff, Wilbert L. A. Hetterscheid The first successful hybrid of Amorphophallus titanum (Buy)
 ABSTRACT: The first successful hybrid involving Amorphophallus titanum (Becc.) Becc. ex Arc. is being introduced. It concerns a cross between A. variabilis Bl. (seed parent) and A. titanum (pollen parent) and is described here as a new cultivar. Its origin, morphology and propagation are described. The arguments for recognizing it as a cultivar are given.
2012
35
86-95
Kumar Vinod C. Gosavi, Swapnaja M. Deshpande,   Karyomorphological Analysis of Arisaema sahyadricum (Section: Tortuosa): an Endemic Aroid from Western Ghats of India. (Buy)
 ABSTRACT: Genus Arisaema Mart. comprises ca. 170 species in the world. In India, it is represented by about 43 species. Arisaema sahyadricum S. R. Yadav, K. S. Patil & Bachulkar consists of one variety, viz. A. sahyadricum var. ghaticum Sardesai, S.P.Gaikwad & S.R. Yadav under the section Tortuosa, so far known from Maharashtra state. The present paper describes mitotic counts and karyotype analysis of the species and its variety. A. sahyadricum var. sahyadricum and A. sahyadricum var. ghaticum both showed 2n 5 28. The karyotype exhibited 1b category of Stebbins asymmetry classes. These two taxa also showed difference in their karyotypic formulae. Arisaema sahyadricum var. sahyadricum displayed 8sm + 22m chromosomes while A. sahyadricum var. ghaticum showed 2sm + 26m chromosomes.
2012
35
96-102
Peter C. Boyce,   Lost Aroids: On the taxonomic importance of relocating poorly collected species (Buy)
 ABSTRACT: Aridarum montanum Ridl. and Piptospatha insignis N.E.Br. (Araceae: Schismatoglottideae), aroids originating from Borneo that are each known from a single collection, are discussed and illustrated. The history of their discovery is reviewed, together with what is known or speculated of their ecology. The biological significance of the collection locality of A. montanum is highlighted. The species’ individual importance to modern systematics is highlighted.
2012
35
103-108
Cyrille Claudel, Alan Galloway Hybridization of Amorphophallus – state of the art (Buy)
 ABSTRACT: Amorphophallus, a large and ornamental genus within the Araceae, has been very little implicated in the creation of new hybrids. Merely in the hands of enthusiasts, first attempts have been made in recent years to explore the possibilities of interspecific hybridization within this genus. We want to document these attempts as far as we know of them, in matters of ‘‘trial and success’’ in order to encourage other enthusiasts to follow us on this exciting exploration.
2012
35
109-112
  Lagenandra ovata, a neglected gem (Buy)
 ABSTRACT: The genus Lagenandra is a group of medium- to small-sized aroids found in tropical Asian countries such as Sri Lanka and India. Lagenandra species have been grown and distributed by tropical fish and aquarium hobbyist around the world, but this group is still uncommon in most stores and only specialty stores may carry it.
2012
35
113-131
 , S.K. Naskar Breeding Major Edible Aroids in India Problems, Achievements and Future Prospects: A Review. (Buy)
 ABSTRACT: Taro, elephant foot yam and tannia are the three major aroid types commonly cultivated in India for the edible tubers for use as vegetable. These crops are vegetatively propagated. Improvement work has been done mainly by clonal selection from land races available in the country. Of the different varieties released in these crops, eight taro varieties and two elephant foot yam varieties are from the Central Tuber Crops Research Institute, Trivandrum and its regional centre at Bhubaneswar. Among the three crops, genetic variability exists in taro in which open pollination and seed set occurs, whereas lack of seed set due to the very low flowering nature along with protogyny and incompatibility have restricted the seed set in elephant foot yam and tannia resulting in the lack of variability. Using the rarely flowered accessions, breeding procedures in all the three crops were standardized at the CTCRI and true seed production was achieved in large scale which has enabled the enhancement of the genetic variability in taro and in elephant foot yam. The release of the first hybrid variety in taro (Sree Kiran) and elephant foot yam (Sree Athira) from the CTCRI indicate the scope of hybridization and selection for the production of heterotic hybrids in these crops. Breeding programs are underway for the production of disease resistant varieties. The sexually derived clones are under different stages of evaluation. The aroid breeding in India is limited to a national level research programs. The germplasm of these species has been collected from different parts of India and evaluation is being undertaken to unlock the potential of these species for various attributes. Structuring the genetic diversity is necessary to optimize the use of germplasm by breeders for which molecular level screening is highly warranted.
2012
35
132-143
M. Nedunchezhiyan, S.K. Jata, A. Mukherjee, R. S. Misra Sprout Bud Culture: A Rapid Multiplication Technique for Elephant Foot Yam (Amorphophallus paeoniifolius [Dennst.] Nicolson) Propagation (Buy)
 ABSTRACT: Sprout bud culture experiments for economic and rapid multiplication on elephant foot yam (Amorphophallus paeoniifolius [Dennst.] Nicolson) were conducted from 2009 to 2010 at Regional Centre of Central Tuber Crops Research Institute, Dumuduma, Bhubaneswar, India. Sprout buds 2.5–3.0 cm diameter with root initials on the buds along with 0.5–1.0 cm length mother corm below the sprout buds could be successfully used as planting material. Such sprouts were initially planted in plastic cups filled with pot mixture. After shoot and root development within 15 days of planting, they could be transplanted into the main field. Maximum sprout induction and sprout harvesting (.2.5 cm diameter) could be achieved by soaking the corms in 400 ppm thiourea solution for 30 min at 15 days interval and could be kept under white polyethylene sheet cover. From a corm size of 500 6 25 g, maximum 19 sprouts each of more than 2.5 cm diameter could be harvested within 16 weeks time. The remaining portion of the corm can also be used as planting material. Thus, propagation ratio of elephant foot yam could be increased 19 timeswithin 16weeks. The transplanted sprout buds (10–12 g) produced 320 g corms with the best agronomic management practices.
2012
35
144-148
Dylan P. Hannon Caring for Dormant Tuberous Aroids (Buy)
 ABSTRACT: The cultivation requirements for tuberous or geophytic aroids can be considered in two parts during a given year: the active above-ground growth of aerial parts and the below-ground dormancy of the rootstock. Most attention to this subject in the horticultural literature and in discussions involves the former; this article will focus on the rest period of these plants, mainly as this pertains to container cultivation. My experience in this plant category comes from over three decades of cultivating about 2000 different geophytes including numerous aroids. In growing these plants I have sought to find what will succeed in keeping them year to year rather than discovering an easier or more efficient methodology–a hobbyist rather than a commercial approach.
2012
35
149-149
Zach DuFran, Danny Ellis, Taylor Holzer, Leland Miyano, Leslie Rule, D. Christopher Rogers Experiences growing aroids from seed
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 ABSTRACT: We present our experiences and techniques for germinating several aroid genera from seed: Alocasia, Ambrosina, Amorphophallus, Anchomanes, Anthurium, Anubias, Arisaema, Arum, Biarum, Colocasia, Eminium, Dracunculus, Gonatopus, Helicodiceros, Dracunculus, Monstera, Pinellia, Philodendron, Pycnospatha, Pseudodracontium, Pseudohydrosme, Rhaphidophora, Sauromatum and Typhonium
2012
35
160
Greg Ruckert Aroids in cyberspace
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 ABSTRACT: Remember the time when you had to struggle to get information about your passion? Hours spent pouring through literature in botanical libraries (even travelling to the other side of the world to do so). If you were lucky you knew someone else passionate about the same plants as yourself, in your own country. You might even have been able to send them a cheque in the post to buy that item you wanted. If you were lucky you found out about the International Aroid Society (IAS), joined, and were able to extend your network of contacts and sources of plant material and literature.