IAS Aroid Quasi Forum

About Aroid-L
 This is a continuously updated archive of the Aroid-L mailing list in a forum format - not an actual Forum. If you want to post, you will still need to register for the Aroid-L mailing list and send your postings by e-mail for moderation in the normal way.

  great Photos from Joep Moonen!
From: ExoticRainforest <Steve at exoticrainforest.com> on 2009.01.25 at 22:11:55(18974)
Joep Moonen sent these to me earlier today and all werephotographed in French Guiana although he says they not nativespecies. These are not identified and both of us would like an ID. Can anyone adda name to them?

Thanks!

Steve Lucas

HTML

+More

From: "Elizabeth Campbell" <desinadora at mail2designer.com> on 2009.01.26 at 13:02:19(18986)
Heck no, that second Anthurium isn't native to French Guiana! That's a common Ecuadorean midland species. No idea on the name, but at least you have a country of origin.

The palmate one I think I saw near Cali in Colombia; if I ever go back, I'll be able to tell you for sure.

Beth

HTML

+More

From: brian lee <lbmkjm at yahoo.com> on 2009.01.26 at 17:08:17(18987)
Dear Steve,

Aloha.

I started seeing Anthurium similar to your first photo in Minas Gerais, Bra zil, many years ago. I suspected then that these were hybrids. I have sin ce seen other such plants in collections under various names that are not o fficially recognized. I grow something very similar to the plant illustrat ed, but I do not assign it any name. Mine has the velvety black black-gree n blades of several species...ie. Anthurium magnificum, etc. The lateral l obes are present, but I do not know where this characteristic comes from. Perhaps someone with hybridizing experience can enlighten the forum on this.

Now. There is an Anthurium being sold out there called Anthurium chamberla inii...another unofficial name, if I am not mistaken. It is quite a beauty with deep red new growth and a tulip form inflorescence. I suspect this i s a hybrid...but, someone with more hybridization experience should comment . This comment is a tangent on the subject, not an identification on the s econd photo.

Aloha,

Leland

+More
From: "Windy Aubrey" <exotics at hawaii.rr.com> on 2009.01.27 at 02:44:37(18993)
Hi Steve,

I believe the species you are showing from Joep's collection is the Mexican species A. pedatoradiatum.

At least it looks like ones I imported from Chiapas last year.

There is also a hybrid of this species crossed with A. clarinervium, another Mexican species, and although it has the same palmately lobed appearing leaf as the Pedatoradium parent, it also exhibits the white veining of the Clarinervium parent, thus making it an extremely attractive plant.

Windy

HTML

+More

From: ExoticRainforest <Steve at exoticrainforest.com> on 2009.01.31 at 05:00:59(19005)
Thanks Windy. I'll pass that alongto Joep.

Steve

HTML

+More

From: "Windy Aubrey" <exotics at hawaii.rr.com> on 2009.01.31 at 23:22:39(19014)
Steve,

I stand corrected.

I believe Dr. Tom is correct that this plant in question is a form of A. macrolobum, the hybrid I mentioned in my reply to what the image from Joep might be.

I re-examined my A. pedatoradium and they are a little different, being thinner lobed.

The A. macrolobum (A. pedatoradium X A. clarinervium) I saw before had more of the parent A. clarinervium's white veining, so for that reason I was thrown off, but the leaf shape was identical to the plant shown in the image you showed.

I will post a picture of the A. pedatoradium I received from Chiapas. They are just started to grow out.

Windy

HTML

+More

From: "Marek Argent" <abri1973 at wp.pl> on 2009.02.01 at 15:36:20(19017)
Dear Windy and Steve

So... if A. macrolobum is a hybrid (and its parents are known) shouldn't the correct name be A. ◊ macrolobum?

Marek

HTML

+More

From: ExoticRainforest <Steve at exoticrainforest.com> on 2009.02.01 at 20:23:16(19024)
Sounds right to me Marek! Derek,are you out there???

Steve

HTML

+More

Note: this is a very old post, so no reply function is available.