Your search for articles mentioning the genus Alocasia has found 44 articles.

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Year
Vol.
(Issue)
Pages
Author(s)
Title
1978
1(1)
24-25
Michael Madison A new species of Xanthosoma from Ecuador
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 ABSTRACT: Xanthosoma weeksii Madison, sp. nov. is described.
1979
2(2)
35-51
Fred Dortort, Terry Thompson Alocasias (Buy)
 ABSTRACT: A locasia G. Don is a genus of east Asian aroids that contains a number of species of considerable horticultural interest. Members of the genus range from India to Taiwan and New Guinea, but the center of distribution is the Malay peninsula and the Indonesian and Philippine archipelagoes. Alocasia is closely related to the asian Xenophya and Colocasia and to the American genera Xanthosoma and Caladium.
1979
2(2)
62-63
Michael Madison Aroid profile no. 4: Xenophya lauterbachiana
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 ABSTRACT: Xenophya lauterbachiana (Engler)Nicolson, Blumea 16:117 (1968) Synonyms: Schizocasia lauterbachiana Engler Alocasia wavriniana Mast. Reference: Nicolson, D.H., 1968. The Genus Xenophya Schott (Araceae), Blumea 16:115-118. in primary lowland rainforest to elevations of 700m in northeastern New Guinea. The species was introduced into cultivation by Micholitz in the 1890's, and has been sparingly cultivated ever since, though it is a handsome plant that ought to be more widely grown.
1980
3(1)
13-18
Mark D. Moffler Qualitative observations on tropical aroid cold tolerance (Buy)
 ABSTRACT: As winter approaches each year, we all become concerned about protecting our tropical plants, especially those which are the most susceptible to cold damage. The fall of 1978 was mild in Tampa, with temperatures seldom reaching below 100C (500F). The mild fall gave many of us a false sense of security and steps for cold protection were put off until "tomorrow". It wa~ this unfortunate procrastination that lead to a premature study of cold tolerance in aroids. My initial idea was to test several landscape and porch plants for cold susceptibility, but unfortunately, I unintentionally tested 46 different aroids.
1982
5(1)
8-10
Marcel Lecoufle Propogation [sic] of caladiums
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 ABSTRACT: Division, pollination and propagation by seed is discussed.
1982
5(2)
47-59
Michael H. Grayum The aroid flora of Finca La Selva (Buy)
 ABSTRACT: Costa Rica is a small Central American nation about the size of Denmark, with a remakable array of climatic regimes, and altitudes ranging from sea level to nearly four thousand meters. One can ascend from semidesert scrub forests on the Pacific slope, up through sodden cloud forests to pa'ramo (a kind of a high altitude chaparral) on the highest peaks, and down again on the Caribbean slope, through alders, elms and oaks, to humid lowlands and rain forests. The plants growing in this multifaceted domain are incredibly diverse, even by tropical standards. Costa Rica boasts nearly twenty-five percent more species of dicots, for example, than the lush tropical isle of Java, and nearly two and a half times as many species of dicot epiphytes (Burger, 1980) - this despite the fact that Java is two and a half times larger than Costa Rica and has yielded fifty percent more herbarium specimens per unit area (Prance., 1978).
1982
5(3)
67-88
Dan H. Nicholson Translation of Engler's classification of Araceae with updating (Buy)
 ABSTRACT: When Hooker (1883) was preparing the treatment of Araceae (Aroideae) for the monumental 'Genera Plantarum,' he basically followed the Schottian system, incorporating Engler's (1879) reduction in the number of genera. The first system was "popularized" by Hutchinson (1959) who, with a reversal of the sequence (bisexual genera first), published essentially an English translation of Hooker's latin. Engler (1905-1920), in his monumental 'Das Pflanzenreich', produced his final treatment of the family, including all then known species in nine volumes. This work remains the standard reference for the family as a whole.
1982
5(4)
101-102
Jim Georgusis Propagation of alocasias
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 ABSTRACT: My first experience with Alocasias was some ten years ago. A friend of mine in New Orleans had given me a community pot of ALocasia chanterieri corms. Most of these 3-4 leaf plantlets were well rooted and were planted soil separately into 4" plastic pots. There were, however, a few corms that had not sprouted so I replanted them and waited a rather long period for them to sprout. Soon, I grew impatient and decided to see what might be the delay. Upon unearthing the unsprouted corms, it was noticed they all had a rather thin but durable shell much resembling the coating of a dry kidney bean but not as thick.
1982
5(4)
103-107
David Burnett The problems of names for Araceae: A proposal for hybrid and cultivars (Buy)
 ABSTRACT: There are internationally accepted rules for naming plants at all of these levels. Further there are rules for naming hybrids between Genera (there are probably no known intergeneric hybrids in Araceae): Hybrids between species and hybrids between cultivars. Generally species hybrids are to be named by a formula (and, if appropriate, a name) and hybrids between cultivars by a name along the lines of cultivars. What I propose in this article is that we must depart, slightly, from the rules of the Code. What I regard as two slight departures may seem, to some, as major. This is a matter for the members to decide.
1983
6(3)
73
M. Johnson, David Prudhomme Photograph: Alocasia zebrina inflorescence
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1983
6(3)
74-82
Lawrence E. Garner Hybridizing alocasias for the landscape (Buy)
 ABSTRACT: For many plant fanciers, the image of tropical lushness with its abundant humidity and dense exotic vegetation, is conveyed vividly by the aroids known as Alocasias. However, the widespread enjoyment of them by gardeners and plant enthusiasts has been significantly hindered by the tenderness and apparent fussiness of the more desirable species. As plant breeders, therefore, we saw a need for the development of hardier, more interesting alocasias with ability to withstand ordinary abuse as well as outdoor growing conditions, at least in southern Florida and California. The recognition of this need, along with a desire to learn more about the alocasias as a genus, were the main objectives of the work described herein.
1983
6(4)
129-132
F. D. Ghani, F. D. Ghani Ornamental and edible aroids of peninsular Malaysia (Buy)
 ABSTRACT: Most aroids are widely distributed in the tropics and subtropics with a few species in temperate regions. The majority occur in the countries of South East Asia, South and Central America, Africa and the West Indies. The family has a total of 110 genera and ca. 2500 species (Croat, 1979), 92% of which are in South East Asia and Central and South America. In Malaysia alone there are 23 native genera and about 120 species (Henderson, 1954).
1983
6(4)
163
 Anonymous Errata for vol. 6
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1984
7(3)
68-162
David Burnett The cultivated alocasia (Buy Back Issue)
 ABSTRACT: Given that A/ocasia has been an enduring ornamental foliage favorite for over 150 years, it is surprising that there has never been a horticultural text on the genus. It is time there was such a publication. What follows is simply the informed opinion of one collector. It is not a taxonomic treatise; rather it is a publication written by a collector for the benefit of other collectors. It pretends to be nothing else.
1985
8(2)
44-46
Alan Herndon Naturalized aroids
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 ABSTRACT: Tropical plants are strangers in most of the United States. Freezing temperatures, unknown in their native lands, force them to remain inside protective walls throughout the cold season. In south Florida, however, freezing temperatures are rare, and many tropical plants can be grown outdoors all year round. Along with the ability to grow yearround outside also comes the ability to escape. Several aroids have done just that, and a few have entrenched themselves so well among the native flora that only our historical knowledge allows us to recognize that they were brought in deliberately by man.
1985
8(3)
89-93
Dorothy E. Shaw, A. Hiller, Katherine A. Hiller Alocasia macrorrhiza and birds in Australia (Buy)
 ABSTRACT: Reports are given of the eating of berries of Alocasia macrorrhiza by Lewin's Honeyeater and the Regent Bowerbird in the wild in Australia; it is not known, however, whether the seed is regurgitated or voided. Aspects of ornithochory are discussed in relation to the reports.
1986
9(1)
3-213
Thomas B. Croat, Nancy Lambert The Araceae of Venezuela (Buy Back Issue)
 ABSTRACT: An illustrated treatment of 171 Venezuelan Araceae taxa is provided. Discussion of range, species characteristics and distinction from similar or closely related species is made for each taxon. Sixteen species, three subspecies and one variety are described as new, and three new combinations are made.
1987
10(2)
4-16
Josef Bogner Morphological variation in aroids (Buy)
 ABSTRACT: The Araceae or aroid., are a large family of about 2400 species, grouped in 107 genera and these again in nine subfamilies. The aroids are mainly a tropical family and are distributed world-wide. They show great variation in their morphological characters, which will be described in this paper along with some other data.
1987
10(2)
17-19
R. Hegnauer Phytochemistry and Chemotaxonomy of the Araceae
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 ABSTRACT: Many Aroids taste painfully acrid and are toxic. Nevertheless the family yields a number of tropical food crops and many ornamental plants. Phytochemistry and chemotaxonomy of Aroids is discussed.
1988
11(3)
4-55
Thomas B. Croat Ecology and life forms of Araceae (Buy Back Issue)
 ABSTRACT: The most interesting aspect of the family's ecology is the diversity of adaptive life forms. These range from submerged to free-floating, and emergent aquatics to terrestrial plants and to epilithic or epiphytic forms which may be true epiphytes or hemiepiphytic (growing on trees but rooted in soil). Hemiepiphytism is diverse itself, with some species beginning their lives as terrestrial seedlings, then growing skototropically (toward darkness) until they arrive at the nearest suitable tree ( usually a relatively large one which casts a darker shadow) where a physiological change takes place allowing them to grow toward light (Strong & Ray, 1975). They grow as appressed epiphytes on trees or as vines in the canopy. Others begin their lives as true epiphytes, some reconverting to hemiepiphytes by producing long, dangling roots contacting the forest floor below.
1989
12(1)
26-31
Alistair Hay On the identity of Alocasia brisbanensis (F. M. Bailey) Domin (Buy)
 ABSTRACT: Alocasia brisbanensis (EM. Bailey) Domin is shown to be a hitherto overlooked, highly distinctive and common Australian endemic species. It is largely extra-tropical. It is assigned to a new section within Alocasia, sect. Ozarum, primarily on the basis of its linear, often multistaminate, synandria and robustly long-pedunculate inflorescences, characters which distinguish this species from all others in the genus.
1990
13(1)
4-13
Alistair Hay Collecting alocasia in New Guinea (Buy)
 ABSTRACT: At the end of 1988 the Christensen Fund generously awarded me a fellowship for several weeks specifically to work on Alocasia. The Christensen Research Institute is situated at Jaisaben, a few miles north of Madang on the north coast of Papua New Guinea, and is run by Dr. Matthew Jebb, who is an authority on rubiaceous ant-plants.
1993
16
5-11
Julius O. Boos, Hans E. Boos Additions to the aroid flora of Trinidad with notes on their probable origins and uses (Buy)
 ABSTRACT: These notes are based on collections and observations commencing in July 1988, when the senior author visited his homeland. They document recent discoveries of both native and introduced species of aroids and attempt where possible to explain reasons for some of the introductions.
1993
16
37-46
Gitte Peterson Chromosome numbers of the genera Araceae (Buy)
 ABSTRACT: An overview of the chromosome numbers of the genera of Araceae is given.
1995
18
20
Jim Donovan Photograph: Alocasia macrorrhizos (L.) G. Don var. 'New Guinea Gold' growing at the editor's home.
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1995
18
32-39
Dorothy C. Bay Thermogenesis in aroids (Buy)
 ABSTRACT: Thermogenesis, as it occurs in the plant inflorescence has been observed and studied for over two centuries. At least seven thermogenic families of plants are known including Annonaceae, Araceae, Arecaceae, Aristolochiaceae, Cycadaceae, Cyclanthaceae, and Nymphaeaceae. The sequence of thermogenic events is very precise and highly synchronized in each species. The physiology is not well understood, but the recent identification of salicylic acid as the triggering hormone for thermogenesis has opened the door for further research, especially in the areas of plant signal transduction pathways and systemically acquired resistances. Thermogenesis has proven to be an advantageous process to plants for maximizing pollination and limiting hybridization. Beetle pollinators also benefit from the phenomenon.
1998
21
8-12
Makoto Tahara, Viet Xuan Nguyen, Hiromichi Yoshino Karyotype analyses on diploid and tetraploid of Alocasia odora K. Koch (Buy)
 ABSTRACT: The karyotypes of diploid (2n = 2X 28) and tetraploid (2n = 4x = 56) forms of Alocasia odora (Roxb.) K. Koch were analyzed to determine their cytological relationship. The chromosome length and morphology were found similar between the two ploidy types. Phylogenetic relationship investigated by polymorphism of 13 enzyme systems also suggested closeness of the two ploidy types of A. odora.
1998
21
13-22
Dorothy E. Shaw Damage to plants and ingestion of fruit and seeds of Alocasia brisbanensis (F. M. Bailey) Domin (Araceae) by the bush-turkey (Alectura lathami (Buy)
 ABSTRACT: Damage to the leaves, petioles and peduncles of fruiting plants of Alocasia brisbanensis by the Brush-turkey (Alectura lathamt) occurred as a consequence of the birds trying to reach the fruit. Tests showed that the turkey will pick mature red fruit from spadices, and with some difficulty, green fruit (if the infructescences are within reach) and that it will eat detached ripe red fruit, red fruit pulp, seeds free from pulp, immature green fruit and less readily, unfertilized florets. It is not known whether the seed is regurgitated, crushed in the gizzard, digested in the gastro- intestinal tract, or voided, and if the last, whether it is still viable or not. Information on the ingestion of other aroid fruit by birds and animals is also listed.
1998
21
23-25
Dorothy E. Shaw Fruit of Alocasia brisbanensis (F. M. Bailey) Domin ingested by the eastern water dragon (Physignathus lesueurii lesueurii) in Queensland
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 ABSTRACT: Some plants of the indigenous 'cunjevoi' [Alocasia brisbanensis (F.M. Bailey) Domin, formerly known in Australia as A. macrorrhiza, -rrhizos (L.) G. Do n] grow in a gully in a simulated rainforest at Indooroopilly near a bank of the Brisbane River and reach a height of about 8 feet (2.4 m) (Fig. 1). On 6 March 1998, during an inspection of the few remaining infructescences (fruiting heads) left on the plants after the current season, an Eastern Water Dragon (Physignathus lesueurii Gray lesueurit) was found eating the ripe, fleshy red berries still remaining on one of the fru iting heads.
1998
21
26-145
Thomas B. Croat History and current status of systemic research with Araceae (Buy Back Issue)
 ABSTRACT: This paper will cover all systematic and floristic work that deals with Araceae which is known to me. It will not, in general, deal with agronomic papers on Araceae such as the rich literature on taro and its cultivation, nor will it deal with smaller papers of a technical nature or those dealing with pollination biology. It will include review papers on technical subjects and all works, regardless of their nature, of current aroid researchers. It is hoped that other reviews will be forthcoming which will cover separately the technical papers dealing with anatomy, cytology, physiology, palenology, and other similar areas and that still another review will be published on the subject of pollination biology of Araceae and the rich literature dealing with thermogenesis.
2001
24
56-65
Dorothy E. Shaw Fertile florets (Buy)
 ABSTRACT: The numbers of female florets on 12 inflorescences of Alocasia brisbanensis (F. M. Bailey) Domin ranged from 117 to 231 per inflorescence with a mean of 165.6. The numbers of stigmatic lobes on 1,987 pistils of these heads ranged from 1 to 5, with those with 2 (51.9%) and 3 (42.2%) lobes predominant. Stigmas with 1 lobe (1.8%) occurred in pistils designated 'tubular' with no ovules, and 'globose' with a mean number of 2 ovules. One 4- and all 5-lobed stigmas, called 'doubles' had joined adjacent ovary walls and stigmas. The numbers of ovules ranged from 0-10, and although these figures were variable, there was a general trend for the number of ovules per ovary to increase with the number of stigmatic lobes to 4 lobes, and then decrease. The ageing of the stigmas is described, and data on various inflorescence and infructescence characteristics from the literature are listed.
2001
24
66-68
Dorothy E. Shaw The natural stimulation of some unfertilized female florets of Alocasia brisbanensis (Araceae)
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 ABSTRACT: The stimulation of certain unfertilized female florets (u.f.f.) of Alocasia brisbanensis is reported. The affected florets occur adjacent to or around berries (fertilized female florets). The stimulated florets are larger than the unfertilized florets (but smaller than the berries) and reddish orange in color rather than the smaller orange- colored normal u.f.f., although all u.f.f. later usually turn reddish. The stimulated florets are seedless. It is suggested that a growth substance of unknown composition causes the stimulation from the maturing berries.
2001
24
69-79
Dorothy E. Shaw Variegation in Alocasia brisbanensis (F. M. Bailey) Domin (Araceae) (Buy)
 ABSTRACT: Plants of Alocasia brisbanensis at sites in the Brisbane River Valley were recorded as 0) variegated, including (0 plants with overall coloration (called 'haze') in the petiole and peduncle plus a pattern on the petiole and peduncle, and (ii) plants without haze but with the pattern, and (2) nonvariegated plants. Microscopically the haze was found to consist of vertical lines of pigmented parenchyma between the bundles of fibers at the periphery of the petiole and peduncle, and the pattern on the petiole as pigmented parenchyma clustered around some parts of the vertical and tangential vessels, and on the peduncle often between the vertical rows of fiber bundles. Very young seedlings also showed variegation on the cataphylls and first foliar leaf petioles. A range of variegation involving the intensity of both haze and pattern was found in the progeny of natural crosses. Plants with intense overall haze appeared smaller than the ones without this feature. The pigment is water-soluble.
2002
25
70-73
 Yuzammi, Alistair Hay A new Bornean species of Alocasia (Araceae) from Sulawesi (Buy)
 ABSTRACT: Alocasia megawatiae Yuzammi & A. Hay, sp. nov. is described.
2002
25
74-77
J. Hernandez Notes on the Araceae of Botel Tobago (Buy)
 ABSTRACT: Araceae were observed on Botel Tobago. Ecological observations were made on all species seen. Pollinators were observed and collected from Homalomena philippinensis Engl. Zheng and Lu's (2000) species account for Schismatoglottis kotoensis (Hayata) T. C. Huang, J. L. Hsiao, and H. Y. Yeh is translated.
2003
26
96-105
Dorothy E. Shaw Dimorphic pollen of Alocasia brisbanensis (Araceae) in Queensland (Buy)
 ABSTRACT: Pollen of Alocasia brisbanensis (F. M. Bailey) Domin at Indooroopilly near Brisbane, and at Tolga Scrub ca. 1,400 km NW of Brisbane, was dimorphic. At the time of pollen extrusion it consisted of (1) normal grains with a diameter range of 32.~9.9 J.Lm and a mean of 40.0 J.Lm, with stainable protoplasm, starch and ability to germinate; and (2) small, aborted grains with a diameter range of 19.0-34.2 fJ.m and a mean of 27.7 fJ.m, and without stainable protoplasm, no starch and inviable. At extrusion the amount of aborted grains ranged from 1.8-14.9% (that is, with high variability) with a mean of 6.5%. The amount of aborted grains in buds and during gaping of the spathe was also highly variable but with means of 7.0% and 5.8% respectively, with an average of 6.4% for the 21,201 total grains examined for all stages.
2004
27
201-204
D. Hervelle How can you say "They are only Alocasias ..."? (Buy)
 ABSTRACT: I never had any interest in plants until my mother give me a beautiful scindapsus for my wedding, or more exactly gave it to my wife! It is strange what this has led to, because I had always considered plants as uninteresting, and only a couple of months before this, when we saw a book with the title 'The Passion of Plants, I had said to my wife that I did not see how it was possible to have a passion for something that is not moving: completely stupid!
2005
28
91-100
Dorothy E. Shaw The stigma and style of Alocasia brisbanensis (F.M. Bailey) Domin (Araceae) (Buy)
 ABSTRACT: The stigmatic surface of each lobe of Alocasia brisbanensis consisted of a head of closely packed vertical papillae 160-220(- 250) f.Lm long by (9.5-)11.4(-13.3) f.Lm wide, some tapering to 3.8-5.7 f.Lm wide towards the base, each unicellular with a rounded tip. Deterioration and disorganization of stigmas occurred with deliquescence after about Day 7 from unfurling. The styles were short (0.2-)0.3(-0.4) mm long, with scattered idioblasts and raphide bundles in an outer zone encircling an inner solid core with some vascular elements. Stigmas pressed gently onto clean, dry, glass slides left an imprint consisting of minute amorphous particles, and the stigmas are therefore tentatively classed as wet Group III. Sampling of attached and detached inflorescences via a trapdoor cut into the spathal chambers, as well as through the spathal gaps (using Quantofix (R) Peroxide 25 test sticks) indicated receptivity of the stigmas during the bud stage and gaping of the spathal limb, and even after closure of the gap.
2005
28
101-103
Dorothy E. Shaw, L. H. Bird A note on the dimorphic pollen of variegated Alocasia brisbanensis (F.M. Bailey) Domin (Araceae)
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 ABSTRACT: Pollen from three variegated plants, two with overall purplish-brown coloration (haze) plus pattern from Ipswich, about 32 km in direct line west of Brisbane, and one with pattern only from Indooroopilly near Brisbane, was dimorphic. Pollen from two non-variegated plants from Indooroopilly was also dimorphic. The diameter range of normal grains with starch from the variegated and non-variegated plants was 32.3- 47.5 J.Lm with a mean of 40.5 J.Lm, whereas that of the aborted grains without starch was 19.0-36.1 J.Lm with a mean of 26.1 J.Lm. The amount of aborted grains, in a total of 2512 examined from the five specimens, was 5.1-9.8% with a mean of 7.1 %. After examination of the above results, it is suggested that the gene, or genes, for variegation is not genetically linked to the mechanism leading to abortion of some grains.
2008
31
114-119
L. Garner A new hybrid alocasias for the 21st century (Buy)
 ABSTRACT: Tropical gardening has become quite popular in recent years, and with that has come a greater demand for new and interesting tropical subjects for these gardens. The Alocasia X portora and Alocasia X calidora, first described in Aroideana Vol. 6, No. 3, have both figured prominently in many of these gardens, but since those two plants were developed, we have completed a significant amount of additional hybridizing work at Aroidia Research. Some of the new plants that have resulted from this extensive work are described and illustrated herein.
2009
32
126-131
Wilbert L. A. Hetterscheid, Josef Bogner, Julius O. Boos Two new Caladium species (Araceae) (Buy)
2009
32
165-169
Myles Challis In search of Eldorado (Buy)
2009
32
170-177
Steve Lucas A collector's dream to build a rain forest (Buy)
2009
32
178-182
Leland Miyano Lessons from a paradise (Buy)