Your search for articles published in volume 27 has found 17 articles.

You can Purchase Back Issues of Aroideana Here

Articles of 3 pages or less are available for free to IAS members for download, and longer articles for $5. Articles from issues in 2016 and beyond are only available electronically, and are free to current members when they are logged in.

Please remember that all Aroideana articles are protected by copyright, and you may NOT distribute even electronic copies without permission from the authors or editor.


Year
Vol.
(Issue)
Pages
Author(s)
Title
2004
27
2-37
Thomas B. Croat, L. P. Hannon Chlorospatha of Antioquia (Colombia) (Buy)
 ABSTRACT: This paper treats all the species of Chlorospatha from the Department of Antioquia in Colombia. A total of 8 new species are described, all of which are endemic to Colombia. These are C. amalfiensis Croat & L. Hannon, C. antioquiensis Croat & L. Hannon, C. betancurii Croat & L. Hannon, C. callejasii Croat & L. Hannon, C. cogolloi Croat & L. Hannon, C. luteynii Croat & L. Hannon, C. macphersonii Croat & L. Hannon and C. nicolsonii Croat & L. Hannon. Four additional previously described taxa (3 species; 1 subspecies) occur in Antioquia, namely C. corrugata Bogner & Madison, C. gentryi Grayum, C. mirabilis (M. T. Masters) Madison, and C. croatiana Grayum ssp. enneaphylla Grayum, and are included in a key to the species in Antioquia.
2004
27
38-60
Thomas B. Croat, C. C. Finch New species of Philodendron (Araceae) from South America (Buy)
 ABSTRACT: The following new species are described: Philodendron aureimarginatum Croat, P. campii Croat, P. clarkei Croat, P. moonenii Croat, P. paucinervium Croat, P. sparreorum Croat and P. werkhoveniae Croat.
2004
27
61-63
Thomas B. Croat, X. Cornejo New species of Anthurium from western Ecuador
This article available FREE to IAS Members with a PERSONAL login. LOGIN, REGISTER or JOIN
 ABSTRACT: Two species of Anthurium are described as new to science. The new species are A. churutense Croat & X. Cornejo and A. colonchense Croat & X. Cornejo, both members of Anthurium section Porphyrochionium.
2004
27
64-89
Thomas B. Croat, B. Oberle New species of Araceae from Colombia (Buy)
 ABSTRACT: The following taxa from the Colombia, mostly from the Department of Antioquia, are described as new to science: Anthurium acanthospadix Croat & Oberle, A. atramentarium Croat & Oberle, A. chrysolithos Croat & Oberle, A. hodgei Croat, Oberle & Mora, A. johnmackii Croat & Oberle, A. licium Croat & Oberle, A. macphersonii Croat & Oberle, A. modicum Croat & Oberle, A. silverstonei Croat & Oberle, A. soejartoi ssp. soejartoi Croat & Oberle, and A. soejartoi ssp. ascendens Croat & Oberle, A. subaequans Croat & Oberle, and Philodendron danielii Croat & Oberle.
2004
27
90-129
Thomas B. Croat, M. Marcela Mora New taxa of Araceae from Cabo Corrintes in Choco Department of Colombia (Buy)
 ABSTRACT: New species of Araceae are described from the Estacion Biological El Amargal and vicinity on Cabo Corrientes in Choco Department of Colombia. These are Anthurium acutibacca Croat & M. Mora, A. amargalense Croat & M. Mora, A. arusiense Croat & M. Mora, A. debilis Croat & Bay, A. eminens Schott, ssp. longispadix, Croat & M. Mora, A. galeanoae Croat & M. Mora, A. grandicataphyllum Croat & M. Mora, A. morae Croat, A. pallidicaudex Croat & M. Mora, A. promininerve Croat & M. Mora, A. variilobum Croat & M. Mora, Monstera amargalensis Croat & M. Mora, Philodendron amargalense Croat & M. Mora, P. laticiferum Croat & M. Mora, P. longipedunculatum, Croat & M. Mora, P. roseocataphyllum Croat & M. Mora, Rhodospatha monsalvae Croat & Bay and Xanthosoma daguense Engl. var. amargalense Croat & M. Mora.
2004
27
130-138
Thomas B. Croat, Richard P. Wunderlin New taxa of Homalomena (sect. Curmeria) from the neotropics (Buy)
 ABSTRACT: Two new species and one new subspecies of Homalomena sect. Curmaria are described and characterized. These are Homalomena erythropus ssp. allenii Croat, H. kvistii Croat, and H. moffleriana Croat & Grayum.
2004
27
139-141
Thomas B. Croat, F. Cardona N. New species of Spathiphyllum (Araceae) for Panama and Colombia
This article available FREE to IAS Members with a PERSONAL login. LOGIN, REGISTER or JOIN
 ABSTRACT: Spathiphyllum dressleri Croat & F. Cardona, from Panama and Colombia is described as new. The species is characterized by its stubby, light green spadix.
2004
27
142-147
Marc Gibernau, C. Favre, Thierry Talou, C. Raynaud Floral odor of Arum italicum (Buy)
 ABSTRACT: Volatile compounds emitted by the appendix of Arum italicum Mill. in the South of France were analysed. Three chemotypes were found. The first was rich in fatty acid derivatives (about 75%) but was found in only one individual and needs to be confirmed. A second profile (4 individuals) showed a high proportion (57-84% of the blend) of monoterpenes (~-citronellene and 3,7-dimethyl-1-octene, its reduced chemical form). The third profile (2 individuals sampled twice) was rich 09- 85% of the blend) in sesquiterpenes, particularly two isomers ('Y and ~) of caryophyllene. Moreover p-cresol and 2-heptanone were also present in the blend. Further work is needed to resolve whether these odor differences are different chemotypes of Arum italicum, temporal variation during the flowering season or analytical and experimental biases.
2004
27
148-166
Marc Gibernau, D. Macquart, G. Przetak Pollination in the genus Arum - A review (Buy)
 ABSTRACT: The 28 species of the genus Arum (Araceae) attract and temporarily trap insects (mainly flies, and beetles in a few cases) during a complex pollination process. At anthesis, the appendix of the inflorescence produces heat and emits a specific odor which attracts insects. The lured insects are trapped within the floral chamber when stigmas are receptive. They will be released about 24h later after pollen emission, ensuring pollen dissemination. Studies on the reproductive biology of the genus have shown some degree of variability in the pollination strategies: morphological variations, flowering and heating periods, odor types and the type of pollinating insects. Most species of Arum have never been studied in depth but data available from the literature indicate quite a high diversity of pollination strategy within this genus. Consequently, a general pollination model is not valid at the level of the whole genus. The origin of this diversity certainly results from the biogeographic history of the genus. The plants (Le. species) have developed adaptations in response to different climatic, ecological and biotic (i.e. entomofauna) constraints (Le. selective pressures) according to the various habitats occupied in the different regions of Europe and the Middle East. However, in the absence of phylogenetic data, it is actually impossible to determine how these different reproductive strategies have developed and evolved during the history of this genus.
2004
27
167-171
Hajime Tanaka Reproductive biology of Lysichiton camtschatcense (Araceae) in Japan (Buy)
 ABSTRACT: A reproductive-biology study of Lystchtton camtschatcense Schott was carried out at two sites in central Japan. The flower was shown to be protogynous. According to the stage of anthesis, the flowers changed from female to hermaphrodite condition. Potentially, the species may be pollinated by flies (no reward found), wind or by self-pollination. The seeds are thought to be dispersed by water current or by bears consuming the fruits.
2004
27
172-181
M. M. Antofie In vitro developmental peculiarities of Syngonium (Buy)
 ABSTRACT: A micropropagation protocol of Syngonium podophyllum is proposed in this paper including details of plant sterilization, meristem culture, multiplication stages and acclimatization. The role of mineral composition, vitamin formula and hormone balance on morphogenetic responses like callusogenesis and shoot and root formation are analyzed and discussed.
2004
27
182-189
Eduardo G. Gonçalves, P. S. A. Diener, Ciro de Sousa, Grazielle Alarcao, G. O. Pina A preliminary survey of gynoecium morphology in Xanthosoma (Araceae) (Buy)
 ABSTRACT: The Neotropical genus Xanthosoma is an important source of food crops among aroid genera, but its taxonomy can be considered poorly resolved. In order to make a first approach to the morphological diversity in the genus, 14 species representing most of the range of morphologic variation were analyzed, considering gynoecium morphology and anatomy. Four different gynoecium types are here recognized and described. Presence and distribution of calcium oxalate crystals (druses and raphides), style morphology and arrangement of the anastomosing laticifers have proven to be the most important observed characters and are here suggested as useful taxonomic markers for the genus.
2004
27
190-197
S. Roy Chowdhury, K. Kannan, N. Sahoo, H. N. Verma Environmental control of diurnal variation in photosynthesis in swamp taro leaves (Buy)
 ABSTRACT: In situ gas exchange measurement in leaves of swamp taro, Colocasia esculenta (L.) Schott, grown in swampy land, was studied during a natural diurnal period (0700 hours to 1600 hours) at peak runner production stage (225 DAP). With initial increase in photosynthetic rate up to 1100 hours there was a mid day decline at 1330-1500 hours, followed by further increase at 1530-1600 hours. The photosynthetically active radiation, (PPFD; R2 = 0.61*), air (R2 = 0.81**) and leaf temperature (R2 = 0.80·*) showed significant relationship with photosynthesis indicating importance of light intensity and temperature on photosynthesis rate. The optimum PPFD noted was 1,190 fJ-mole·m-2 S-1 at maximum photosynthesis rate of 9.9778 fJ-mole CO2'm-2 S-I. Similarly optimum air and leaf temperature was found to be 34.4°C and 34.6°c for maximum photosynthesis rate of 11.1887 and 11.2181fJ-mole CO2 m-2 S-1 respectively. The PPFD (photosynthetic photon flux density) appeared critical for increasing leaf temperature directly (R2 = 0.92··) rather than its effect on CO2 fixation rate (R2 = 0.61*). The closer positive association of RH (R2 = 0.69**) with stomatal conductance (g) suggested that CO2 diffusion in swamp taro leaf was controlled by humidity and stomatal conductance while fixation of CO2 appeared under control of light, temperature and other non-stomatal factors.
2004
27
198-200
Brian Spencer Maintenance of specimen collections using beneficial insects for pest control
This article available FREE to IAS Members with a PERSONAL login. LOGIN, REGISTER or JOIN
 ABSTRACT: The concept of integrated pest control is now well known, but selecting the appropriate control involves a consideration of the biology of both the crop and the pest, while addressing the costs and the intended outcome. Managers frequently employ manipulation of the environment, and chemical controls, as well as a multitude of micro and macro biological organisms to achieve an economic level of control. It is the combination of these approaches that is the key to success.
2004
27
201-204
D. Hervelle How can you say "They are only Alocasias ..."? (Buy)
 ABSTRACT: I never had any interest in plants until my mother give me a beautiful scindapsus for my wedding, or more exactly gave it to my wife! It is strange what this has led to, because I had always considered plants as uninteresting, and only a couple of months before this, when we saw a book with the title 'The Passion of Plants, I had said to my wife that I did not see how it was possible to have a passion for something that is not moving: completely stupid!
2004
27
205-211
Peter C. Boyce A review of Epipremnum (Araceae) in cultivation (Buy)
 ABSTRACT: A review of Epipremnum species in cultivation is presented in order to clarify their identities and the names that should be applied.
2004
27
212-217
C. J. Addington Dragons in the citrus grove: Growing Dracunculus in California (Buy)
 ABSTRACT: The joys and rewards of growing the uniquely unusual Dragon Arum (Dracunculus vulgaris Schott) in the Central Valley of California, and one amateur gardener's nearly accidental discovery of how to achieve heavy fruit set and nearly 100% seed germination of this odiferous wonder without hardly trying, thanks to the luck of matching climates.