Your search for articles published in volume 29 has found 16 articles.

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Year
Vol.
(Issue)
Pages
Author(s)
Title
2006
29
2-36
Peter C. Boyce A taxonomic revision of Biarum (Araceae) (Buy)
 ABSTRACT: A taxonomic revision of Biarum is presented. Hitherto species-ranked B. galianii is reduced to a subspecies of B. tenuifolium. Hitherto subspecific (to B. davisii) B. marmarisense is raised to full species rank. The names Biarum abbreviatum, B. aleppicum, B. anguillare, B. arundanum, B. bovei ssp. disparvar. purpureum, B. bovei ssp. dispar var. zanonii, B. cupanianum, B. platyspathum, B. spruneri, B. straussi, B. tenuifolium var. latifolium, B. zelebori, Cyllenium carduchorum, Ischarum crispulum, 1. jraasianum, 1. kotschyi and 1. nobile are lectotypified. Ischarum pyrami is epitypified. A key to all taxa is provided.
2006
29
37-43
Josef Bogner Protarum sechellarum Engl. (Araceae) (Buy)
 ABSTRACT: The monotypic genus Protarum is restricted to a few sites in the Seychelles in the Indian Ocean. The history of the single species, Protarum sechellarum Eng!., and its characteristics are described, together with its ecology and future in the wild and in cultivation.
2006
29
44-52
Wilbert L. A. Hetterscheid, Ralph D. Mangelsdorff Notes on the genus Amorphophallus 14. New species from Madagascar (Buy)
 ABSTRACT: Two new species of the genus Amorphophallus (Araceae) are described from Madagascar: Amorphophallus andranogidroensis Hett. & Mangelsdorff sp. nov. and Amorphophallus erythrorrhachis Hett. ,O. Pronk & R. Kaufmann sp. nov. An updated key to the Malagasy species is presented.
2006
29
53-79
Wilbert L. A. Hetterscheid Notes on the genus Amorphophallus 15. New species from SE Asia (Buy)
 ABSTRACT: Fourteen new species of the genus Amorphophallus are described from SE Asia, based mainly on material in existing living collections. The affinities of the species to existing ones are discussed. Amorphophallus croatii, A. fuscus, A. gallowayi, A. glaucophyllus, A. josefbogneri, A. laoticus, A. lunatus, A. mysuroides, A. ongsakulii, A. prolificus, A. reflexus, A. schmidtiae, A. serrulatus and A. tuberculatus.
2006
29
80-85
Wilbert L. A. Hetterscheid, Alan Galloway New Typhonium. (Araceae) species from Thailand (Buy)
 ABSTRACT: Three new species of the Araceae genus Typhonium are described. They were discovered among material in long -standing living collections. A correction to the key published in Hetterscheid et al. (2001) is provided. Typhonium conchiforme, T. sinhabaedyai and T. tubispathum.
2006
29
86-90
Thomas B. Croat, David Scherberich, Genevieve Ferry A new species of Anthurium (Araceae) from Loreto (Buy)
 ABSTRACT: Anthurium barrieri, a new species of section Leptanthurium is described as new. The species, closely related to A. gracile (Rudge) Schott, is only the second species described for section Leptanthurium. It is distinguished from A. gracile by its erect inflorescences, yellowish spadices with more flowers per spiral, larger lobed flowers, proportionately broader leaf blades and sulcate petioles.
2006
29
91-103
Marcus A. Nadruz Coelho A new species of Anthurium (Araceae) from Brazil (Buy)
 ABSTRACT: Seven new species are described from the southeast region of Brazil. Six species are endemic: two to the state of Espirito Santo (A. boudetii and A. Jragae), two to the state of Rio de Janeiro (A. bragae and A. simonii) and two to the state of Sao Paulo (A. victorii and A. unense). The species distributed in more than one state is A. gomesianum in Minas Gerais and Espfrito Santo. All the species belong to the section Urospadix, subsection Flavescentiviridia, and found in the Atlantic Forest. Descriptions, illustrations and comments on geographical distribution, ecology, phenology and conservation status are provided for each species.
2006
29
104-107
Van Du Nguyen, Thomas B. Croat A new species of Hapaline (Araceae) from Vietnam (Buy)
 ABSTRACT: Hapaline loci, a species, new to the genus, is described from northwest Vietnam.
2006
29
108-131
M. Bedalov, P. Küpfer A study on the genus Arum (Araceae) (Buy)
 ABSTRACT: On the base of literature data, field investigations, studies of herbarium collections and plants in culture, the authors summarize the taxonomic, phytogeographical, karyological and palynological knowledge of certain species of the genus Arum. Special attention is addressed to Arum cylindraceum s.l. (that is with A. alpinum, A. lucanum, A. intermedium and A. maculatum subsp. danicum included). Some comments are also given about A. apulum and A. idaeum. The misinterpretation of many species were mostly caused by old and incomplete first diagnoses, lack of type specimens and locus classiCUS, complicated by a large variability which is linked partly with hybridization.
2006
29
132-137
Peter C. Boyce Arum -- a decade of change (Buy)
 ABSTRACT: When published in 1993 The Genus Arum (Boyce, 1993) presented for the first time in 70 years, and ever in English, a tool to identify with some degree of confidence all of the 25 Arum species and their subordinate taxa then recognized. Inevitably since publication there have been changes in species delimitation as well as new discoveries, such that the species tally for Arum now stands at 28. Changes of note since 1993 include the recognition of two species treated then at subspecific rank within A. orientale Bieb. [A. longispathum Reich. & A. sintenisii (Eng!.) P. C. Boyce] while a further species [A. alpinariae (K. Alpinar & R. R. Mill) P. C. Boyce], treated then as a subspecies of A. elongatum Steven, is formally raised to the level of species in this paper. Additional study has resolved a number of issues including application of names for the species hitherto called A. alpinum Schott & Kotschy and the status of subordinal taxa in A. italicum Miller. These are all detailed below together with sundry other observations. While much work remains to be done on Arum it seems a worthwhile exercise to present an overview of these changes wrought in the past decade and to cast some pointers for work that still remains to be tackled.
2006
29
138-147
Dorothy E. Shaw The Monstera rust fungusas a living probe for aroid DNA (Buy)
 ABSTRACT: It has been pointed out that fungi can act as aids to higher plant classification. The results of inoculation tests with the rust fungus Puccinia paullula f. sp. monsterae are examined in relation to the placement of the taxa in the classifications of the taxonomic and molecular botanists. Out of 72 plant taxa inoculated over a period of years, 64 were immune and eight showed various degrees of susceptibility. Of these eight, seven (Monstera deliciosa, M. standleyana 'Variegata', M. adansonii var. laniata, M. obliqua, M. subpinnata, Stenospermation sp. and Epipremnum pinnatum) are all in the tribe Monstereae of the subfamily Monsteroideae. The eighth, Typhonodorum lindleyanum, the giant swamp taro of Madagascar and East Africa, which is placed in the tribe Peltandreae of a different subfamily (Aroideae), was also found to be moderately susceptible. These eight taxa belong to four genera with present natural geographic distributions in Africa, America, Asia and Australia. Apart from the seeming anomaly of Typhonodorum which may be further evidence of ancient aroid germplasm distribution- the taxa with various degrees of susceptibility to the Monstera rust fungus do reflect affinities as given by the taxonomic and molecular botanists.
2006
29
148-151
Eduardo G. Gonçalves, A. C. D. Maia New evidence of pollination in Gearum brasiliense (Araceae -- Spathicarpeae) (Buy)
 ABSTRACT: New evidence is presented to suggest that the monotypic genus Gearum (Araceae) may be truly cantharophilous, not myophilous as suggested before. The credible pollinators in Gearnm brasiliense are large scarab beetles of the species Cyclocepbala celata, which were collected inside floral chambers of inflorescences between the female and the male phases. Along with the direct observations of insects within inflorescences, general floral morphology and construction are used as indirect evidences of a cantharophily pollination syndrome in this aroid genus.
2006
29
152-157
E. C. Morgan, Jon A. Sperling, K. L. Leon Variation in the traditional uses of Dracontium in the vicinity of Iquitos (Buy)
 ABSTRACT: This paper examines the results of interviews done in the region of Iquitos, Peru concerning the use of dracontium by people living in both urban and remote communities. Uses relating to folklore, health, plant cultivation, and general knowledge of the plant are examined among members of differing tribal groups and different levels of modernization between their communities. Emphasis is placed upon the level of cultural similarity between those interviewed and the urban city of Iquitos, and their particular knowledge and use of Dracontium species.
2006
29
158-160
P. Diaz Jimenez Motusay - Philodendron radiatum Schott (Araceae)
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 ABSTRACT: Motusay (Philodendron radiatum) has a long history of use as a craft material in Tacotalpa in the state of Tabasco. It is collected from the forests where it is epiphytic on many species of trees, but its popularity is leading to overuse of the material and the decline of natural populations.
2006
29
161-165
Thomas B. Croat, Carla V. Kostelac Karl Koch's career with Araceae and his connection with America: Family photo of Karl Koch found with relative in St. Louis (Buy)
 ABSTRACT: The German Karl Heinrich Emil Koch was born 6 June 1809, near Weimar in the Duchy of Sachsen-Weimar-Eisenbach, and died 25 May 1879. He studied medicine and natural sciences in Jena and in Wurzburg. According to a memoir written by Koch's wife, Therese Koch (T. Danzer, pers. comm.), Karl Koch was befriended by the writer, Johann Wolfgang von Goethe, as a young boy, and Goethe encouraged his plant studies. Koch had broad interests including zoology, geology and geography, anthropology, archeology and history but his main interest was with botany, especially horticulture, dendrology and the origin of fruit trees (Edmundson & Lack, 1977).
2006
29
Inside back cover
Thomas B. Croat Corrections in publication: Anthurium nutubarense
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