Your search for articles published in volume 5 has found 26 articles.

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Year
Vol.
(Issue)
Pages
Author(s)
Title
1982
5(1)
3-7
J. C. Arends, F.M. van der Laan Somatic chromosome numbers in Anubias Schott (Buy)
 ABSTRACT: Recently Crusio (1979) published a revision of the African aroid genus Anubias Schott. Simultaneously to his investigations of an analysis of the somatic chromosome numbers of the various species was initiated by the present authors. It appeared however that the chromosomes of Anubias are rather difficult to handle; well spread metaphase plates permitting conclusive counts are rare. At the time Crusio completed his revision there were many uncertainties in respect to the correct chromosome numbers of several plant specimens. Moreover, not all species as recognized by Crusio were available for investigation. Since that time several more species were acquired with the result that a complete chromosomal analysis can now be presented.
1982
5(1)
8-10
Marcel Lecoufle Propogation [sic] of caladiums
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 ABSTRACT: Division, pollination and propagation by seed is discussed.
1982
5(1)
11-12
John Banta Strategies on the breeding of anthuriums
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 ABSTRACT: With the increasing diversity of Anthurium species now being found in collections, it is not surprising that hybrid plants are appearing more frequently than in the past. Aside from the taxonomic problems these hybrids may pose, or answer, they do provide growers with challenging opportunities. Can you imagine a bird's nest type Anthurium with leaf veins like those of Anthurium crystallinum? How would you like an Anthurium hybrid with leaves shaped like those of Anthurium pedatum but with the coloring of Anthurium clarinervum? Plant breeding must be a special province of optimism. I would like to introduce you to a couple of optimistic growers.
1982
5(1)
13-25
Thomas B. Croat A study of Old World aroids (Buy)
 ABSTRACT: There are two major centers of distribution, the Americas, with 35 endemic genera and Asia with 34 endemic genera. Despite this almost equal distribution of genera between the two areas, there are great differences in species richness. For example, about 1350 described species or 55% of the total for the family are restricted to tropical America. My recently acquired experience with distri bution of Araceae in the Old World tropics leads me to believe that real percentages will be even greater for the American tropics. A recently completed four month long field trip to Australia, southeast Asia and Africa allowed me to compare the aroids in these areas with those in the areas visited during the last 17 years in tropical America.
1982
5(1)
26-28
 Anonymous A series of illustrations from Sodiro
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1982
5(2)
35-36
Bette Waterbury A message from the president of the society
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1982
5(2)
37-46
Thomas B. Croat Aroid collecting in western South America (Buy)
 ABSTRACT: I set off on my trip to western South America. I began in Ecuador and continued through Peru and returned by way of Colombia. In all, nearly two thousand aroids were collected and sent back alive. Herbarium specimens, notes and photographs were accumulated as well. My principal objective on the three month trip was to locate as many members of the bird's-nest Anthurium group as possible. Thus the search for this group (technically, section Pachyneurium) set the basic itinerary of the trip.
1982
5(2)
41
 Anonymous News and notes
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1982
5(2)
41
 Anonymous Erratum
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1982
5(2)
47-59
Michael H. Grayum The aroid flora of Finca La Selva (Buy)
 ABSTRACT: Costa Rica is a small Central American nation about the size of Denmark, with a remakable array of climatic regimes, and altitudes ranging from sea level to nearly four thousand meters. One can ascend from semidesert scrub forests on the Pacific slope, up through sodden cloud forests to pa'ramo (a kind of a high altitude chaparral) on the highest peaks, and down again on the Caribbean slope, through alders, elms and oaks, to humid lowlands and rain forests. The plants growing in this multifaceted domain are incredibly diverse, even by tropical standards. Costa Rica boasts nearly twenty-five percent more species of dicots, for example, than the lush tropical isle of Java, and nearly two and a half times as many species of dicot epiphytes (Burger, 1980) - this despite the fact that Java is two and a half times larger than Costa Rica and has yielded fifty percent more herbarium specimens per unit area (Prance., 1978).
1982
5(2)
60-62
 Anonymous A series of illustrations from Sodiro
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1982
5(3)
67-88
Dan H. Nicholson Translation of Engler's classification of Araceae with updating (Buy)
 ABSTRACT: When Hooker (1883) was preparing the treatment of Araceae (Aroideae) for the monumental 'Genera Plantarum,' he basically followed the Schottian system, incorporating Engler's (1879) reduction in the number of genera. The first system was "popularized" by Hutchinson (1959) who, with a reversal of the sequence (bisexual genera first), published essentially an English translation of Hooker's latin. Engler (1905-1920), in his monumental 'Das Pflanzenreich', produced his final treatment of the family, including all then known species in nine volumes. This work remains the standard reference for the family as a whole.
1982
5(3)
89-95
B. Frank Brown The search for the natural habitat of the pink petioled Aglaonema (Buy)
 ABSTRACT: In 1979 three Filipinos on an outing in a remote section of the island of Luzon found a mountain literally covered with previously unknown aglaonemas. This accidental discovery has turned out to be a highly significant botanical event. In addition to making entirely new varieties available, it initiated a whole host of new explorations.
1982
5(4)
99-100
R. J. Henny Breeding guidelines in the genus Aglaonema
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 ABSTRACT: The purpose of this report is to describe the techniques of Aglaonema hybridization at ARCApopka and hopefully encourage other people to attempt crosses on their own. A list of aglaonemas useful for breeding is also included (Table 1).
1982
5(4)
101-102
Jim Georgusis Propagation of alocasias
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 ABSTRACT: My first experience with Alocasias was some ten years ago. A friend of mine in New Orleans had given me a community pot of ALocasia chanterieri corms. Most of these 3-4 leaf plantlets were well rooted and were planted soil separately into 4" plastic pots. There were, however, a few corms that had not sprouted so I replanted them and waited a rather long period for them to sprout. Soon, I grew impatient and decided to see what might be the delay. Upon unearthing the unsprouted corms, it was noticed they all had a rather thin but durable shell much resembling the coating of a dry kidney bean but not as thick.
1982
5(4)
102
Joe Wright Queries
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 ABSTRACT: Questions? Comments! Have you something to ask or say? This format will be devoted to your needs. All inquiries will receive equal attention. Responses are made to the writer and those subjects having general member interest will be treated in the journal.
1982
5(4)
103-107
David Burnett The problems of names for Araceae: A proposal for hybrid and cultivars (Buy)
 ABSTRACT: There are internationally accepted rules for naming plants at all of these levels. Further there are rules for naming hybrids between Genera (there are probably no known intergeneric hybrids in Araceae): Hybrids between species and hybrids between cultivars. Generally species hybrids are to be named by a formula (and, if appropriate, a name) and hybrids between cultivars by a name along the lines of cultivars. What I propose in this article is that we must depart, slightly, from the rules of the Code. What I regard as two slight departures may seem, to some, as major. This is a matter for the members to decide.
1982
5(4)
107-109
R. J. Henny Dieffenbachia breeding: Transmission of foliar variegation to hybrids
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 ABSTRACT: Although Dieffenbachia hybrids have been reported from the late 1900s (1), nothing has been published concerning the inheritance of foliar variegation. Recent information concerning growth (2), control of flowering (4), and inducement of maximum seed set (3) has made Dieffenbachia breeding much more feasible.
1982
5(4)
110-111
R. J. Henny Dieffenbachia breeding: Presence of fertility and sterility in parents and their hybrids
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 ABSTRACT: The single remaining barrier to hybridization involves sterility in collected stock plants or in naturally and artificially produced hybrids. Knowledge of the fertility or sterility of parental plants to be used in a breeding program, as well as their subsequent hybrids, is critical to anyone interested in pursuing Dieffenbachia breeding. This paper is a summary of results obtained at the Agricultural Research Center-Apopka regarding fertility and sterility of 34 breeding lines of Dieffenbachia and their hybrids.
1982
5(4)
112
 Anonymous Illustration of Anthurium bakeri from Rev. Hort.
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1982
5(4)
113
 Anonymous Illustration of Humalomena [sic] wallisii from Ill. Hort.
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1982
5(4)
114-115
Haruyuki Kamemoto, R. D. Sheffer Anthurium wendlingeri x Anthurium scherzerianum
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 ABSTRACT: In 1974 we germinated seeds from open-pollinated flowers of A. scherzerianum which was growing directly below a plant of A. wendLingeri. Two distinct groups of offspring resulted: A. scherzerianum and the species hybrid, A. scherzerianum X A. wendlingeri.
1982
5(4)
116-121
Robert R. White Panama west (Buy)
 ABSTRACT: As Las Cruces lies only a few miles from the border of Panama, the plants found in the adjacent Panamanian highlands are just as much a part of our local flora as are those of Costa Rica. Therein lay the opportunity for two most enjoyable collecting trips to Panama.
1982
5(4)
121
 Anonymous Photograph: Anthurium willdenovii
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1982
5(4)
122
 Anonymous Photograph: Philodendron sp.
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1982
5(4)
123-127
 Anonymous A series of illustrations from Schott's Icones (Buy)