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  Colocasia & Alocasia winter storage temp
From: Lester Kallus <lkallus at earthlink.net> on 1998.12.07 at 20:10:55(2788)
The frost is about to hit us here in Long Island. We're delighted that
it's a month late (although I'm upset that it's coming at all). I've now
dug up all the Alocasia & Colocasia tubers and have them drying in the
basement.

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From: David Thornton <dave at dave-aroid.demon.co.uk> on 1998.12.08 at 17:31:53(2789)
In message ,
Lester Kallus writes
>The frost is about to hit us here in Long Island. We're delighted that
>it's a month late (although I'm upset that it's coming at all). I've now
>dug up all the Alocasia & Colocasia tubers and have them drying in the
>basement.
>
>I've learned that the best storage temperature for caladiums is room
>temperature (and so did quite well last year). What would be the best
>storage temperature for the Alocasia & Colocasia tubers? If it would be
>better at 50-60 degrees, then I'll have to move them to a friend's home.
>
>Thanks,
> Les
>
>
Les,

I am fascinated to know if when you say "dig up" the tubers of Alocasia
and Colocasia, does this mean you grow them out of doors in summer in
New York ? Would it be possible to do this here in the U.K. with say
Alocasia macrorrhiza ?? would love to do so !

Dave

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From: Lester Kallus <lkallus at earthlink.net> on 1998.12.09 at 07:13:24(2790)
Yes, I grow them outside all summer long. They flourished and grew quite
large. Now the trick is to keep them alive till next summer. I did medium
well last year keeping them warm in vermiculite but some of the rotted. I
was advised to just pack them dry and ignore them. My question is whether
that packing dry should be in a cool or a warm place.

Les

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From: "Eddie Vernon" <eddie_vernon at hotmail.com> on 1998.12.09 at 07:33:23(2791)
Dave,

I don't know much about growing colocasia and alocasia, but being from
England and having worked on Long Island, I know that the summer weather
is warmer there than it is in the UK; e.g. I was helping grow apricots
and peaches on Long Island which you can't grow very well outside of
greenhouses in the UK.

Eddie.

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From: Al Wootten <awootten at NRAO.EDU> on 1998.12.09 at 08:42:09(2794)
I didn't bring my Alocasia mac. in last winter until frost had cut it down
in Deltaville, Va (7b). Usually I pick the last tomatoes around Christmas,
when cold sets in until late February. Normally the lows don't go below
the low to mid 20's (an oleander is in its third year nearby without winter
protection). It sat in a bucket in the basement until spring when I planted it
out. It was clearly set back but performing fine last time I visited it
14 Nov--no bigger than last year, though. I do plan to bring it in if
frost doesn't get it tonight.

A patch of Colocasia growing next to it have wintered over for four years
now. The usual pattern is the big central tuber gets badly frost damaged,
turning to mush, but lots of little ones sprout all around it. It did
very poorly in this year's drought, which affected it more than winter
seems to. I suspect, however, that if I wanted big leaf production I should
bring it in, as it seems to be slowly declining.

Clear skies,
Al

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From: dave-poole at ilsham.demon.co.uk on 1998.12.10 at 06:14:44(2796)
David Thornton wrote:

>I am fascinated to know if when you say "dig up" the tubers of Alocasia
>and Colocasia, does this mean you grow them out of doors in summer in
>New York ? Would it be possible to do this here in the U.K. with say
>Alocasia macrorrhiza ?? would love to do so !

David,

C. esculenta grows out of doors throughout the year down here in the
South West (Torquay) and survives remarkably well if planted very
deeply (approx 8" deep). In Plymouth, there is a town garden with a
huge A. macrorhiza that has been in the same spot for about 8 years.
Again it was planted deeply, in a sheltered corner close to a wall.
It is given copious amounts of water during summer and given a gallon
of dilute tomato fertiliser every 10/14 days.

During frosty weather, the leaves are often killed but the plant soon
recovers with the return of warm, spring weather. Generally speaking,
our summers are not quite warm enough to help repair severe winter
damage, but generally speaking temperatures rarely drop much below 1C
(34F) for more than an hour or so at the dead of winter. So far this
winter despite some pretty chilly weather, my clump of C. esculenta is
still looking fine with only one or two of the oldest leaves appearing
'stressed'. I had planned to lift the tubers and store dry in
newspaper until March, but encouraged by excellent plants in a nearby
garden, I'm going to leave them and if necessary, give a thick mulch
of coarse bark.

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From: "Mansell, Richard" <mansell at chuma1.cas.usf.edu> on 1998.12.10 at 06:22:01(2797)
My suggestion would be to just through them in a bucket and keep in a closet
and dry. No lower than 55 degrees for safety. Sure the tuber gets smaller
due to desiccation but that doesn't affect next years growth. I kept a 5
gallon pail full 9 months last year without any problems. BTW. the pail
had tubers in it.

Dick

Richard L. Mansell

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From: Clarence Hester <hesterc at leguin.acpub.duke.edu> on 1998.12.10 at 07:12:38(2802)
Regarding winter storage of alocasia and colocasia, in my experience it
varies
greatly from plant to plant. I've found that those that form true corms
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From: StellrJ at aol.com on 1998.12.10 at 10:54:46(2806)
In a message dated 12/10/98 7:00:54 AM Pacific Standard Time,
hesterc@leguin.acpub.duke.edu writes:

> Those that are more "fleshy" in the root system (e.g., Colocasia

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From: Clarence Hester <hesterc at leguin.acpub.duke.edu> on 1998.12.11 at 06:41:26(2809)
S
> So, am I again behind on nomenclature? Last I heard, C. antiquorum ("eddoe")
> was a subspecies of C. esculenta ("taro").
>
> Jason Hernandez

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From: Lester Kallus <lkallus at earthlink.net> on 1998.12.11 at 10:12:05(2811)
Well the explains why I've done so poorly with illustris & fontanesii in
the past! I did even worse with burgandy stem.

I found an antiquorum illustirs offshoot about 4" high and decided to
transplant that rather than try to store it. Apparently that decision
(before I learned what you say) has insured that I'll have that for next
year. Can I assume you're suggesting I replant my fontanesii right away?

How does the all black colocasia (the one with a thousand names including
"black magic") do?
Les

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From: alistair_hay at rbgsyd.gov.au on 1998.12.13 at 19:32:20(2817)
Dan Nicolson (Flora Vitiensis Nova 1, 1979) and I (Sandakania 7, 1996)
came to the conclusion that subspecies and botanical varieties of
Colocasia esculenta are pretty meaningless. The whole thing (wild
types and cultivars) should botanically just be called C. esculenta,
and diversity of cultivated forms reflected in cultivar and cultivar
group nomenclature set up within the domain of the International Code
of Nomenclature for Cultivated Plants - an interesting little job for
someone.....!

Alistair

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