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  Colocasia esculenta
From: "Richard Mansell (BIO)" <mansell at chuma.cas.usf.edu> on 1997.01.28 at 19:36:44(252)
Greetings: I have been able to obtain a number of tubers of the big green
form of this plant. I can give them away for the price of postage so let
me know so I can sort things out. This plant grows about 4 feet high and
the blade is about 24 inches across. Very nice in the garden or planting.
Will take full sun and although it is usually grown in wet areas, I had no
problem in an elevated, Florida sand medium. You will have plenty of
tubers to share for 1998 as this thing is nicely prolific. I saw some
tubers that were more than 3 pounds today so if you want to grow this to
that size, you can also learn how to make poi. What fun!

If any of you want any of the Caladiums I am getting for aroid-l members I
can include a tuber when I send the former. The Colocasia tubers are
about ready to break dormancy but can be held for months and still the
will survive.

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From: CBL451 at aol.com on 1998.12.14 at 16:30:10(2821)
Concerning C. esculenta, does anyone know what sp. of colocasia or supposed
"variety" of esculenta are the tubers commonly sold in garden centers as
"Elephant Ears"? They are not commonly grown here in Florida but I seem them
in many yards "up North" in the summer. They look like a large form of C.
esculenta and are fairly invasive like esculenta is.(It is an invasive weed in
many Florida lakes, rivers, etc.) The only names I have seen on the packages
is Colocasia sp. Thanks for any info.

Eric Schmidt

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From: "Julius Boos" <ju-bo at email.msn.com> on 1998.12.14 at 19:16:03(2822)
>>Concerning C. esculenta, does anyone know what sp. of colocasia or
supposed
"variety" of esculenta are the tubers commonly sold in garden centers as
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From: Tony Avent <tony at plantdel.com> on 1998.12.15 at 05:38:48(2824)
Dear Folks:

We purchased a stoloniferous form of C. esculenta under the name of C. Red
Dot and C. Orange Flower. It has nearly taken over our pond. This is
reportedly the variety C. esculenta var. aquitalis, which was imported as
slave food according to Scott Ogden.

Tony Avent

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From: "Julius Boos" <ju-bo at email.msn.com> on 1998.12.16 at 07:03:54(2829)
>Dear Folks:

We purchased a stoloniferous form of C. esculenta under the name of C. Red
Dot and C. Orange Flower. It has nearly taken over our pond. This is
reportedly the variety C. esculenta var. aquitalis, which was imported as
slave food according to Scott Ogden.

Tony Avent
Plant Delights Nursery @
Juniper Level Botanic Garden
9241 Sauls Road
Raleigh, NC 27603 USA
Minnimum Winter Temps 0-5 F
Maximum Summer Temps 95-100F
USDA Hardiness Zone 7b
email tony@plantdel.com

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From: "Sampson" <wiz at texas.net> on 1998.12.16 at 11:26:18(2836)
Hi to all,
While in Hawaii, we always take in the native food and in their dish with
fish it is always wrapped and steamed in taro leaves, very tender and
delicious, taste like spinach and the fish imparts a real rich taste to it
all. I want More!! From Hawaii of course!!
I wonder how these stolen-producing plants were useful as ANY food, since
they rarely produce ant type of a sizable tuber? Maybe the young leaves??>

Mele Kalikemaka (sp) (Hawaiian for Merry Christmas)
>From the sampsons

From: Michael Foreman mrdf at earthlink.net> on 2000.03.06 at 19:52:13(4170)
Any Taro connoisseurs out there? Here on the west coast I have found a
supplier of 2 types of Hawaiian Colocasia esculenta, but they are used
mostly for poi. My husband is from Jamaica and he claims the Asian or
Polynesian varieties are too soft. I guess there is a "Red Coco"
(actually Xanthosoma violaceum?) that is grown in Jamaica. Does anyone
know if this is the variety that is popular in Jamaica? Does anyone
know where I could find a plant? Thanks for your help!

Sharon

From: Lester Kallus lkallus at earthlink.net> on 2000.03.07 at 18:58:20(4172)
I purchase Xanthosoma violaceum at hispanic (predominantly Puerto Rican &
Cuban) grocery stores under the name Yautia lila for approximate $3.50 a
pound. The tubers sprout rapidly and grow into large plants with little
fuss. I also found that a group that I didn't get around to planting last
year (had grown in the summer of '98) is still viable and is about to
sprout now that I've finally planted them a year and a half since
harvesting. It's not bad for
$3.50 a pound.

Les

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