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  new ID request
From: Lester Kallus <lkallus at earthlink.net> on 1999.04.13 at 08:12:31(3260)
There's a new request for an ID on the ID site. The inflorescence looks
something like a paeoniifolius to me, but if it's growing in central
Kentucky, I find it hard to believe it would be hardy and naturalizing.

Anyway, check out the image (small, but hopefully adequate) at:
http://www.kallus.com/aroids/aroidid/id.html

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From: "Peter Boyce" <pb02kg at lion.rbgkew.org.uk> on 1999.04.13 at 08:36:45(3261)
Les

Dracunculus vulgaris - the Dragon Arum native to the central and
eastern Med.

Pete

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From: Mitsukiwi at aol.com on 1999.04.14 at 08:19:00(3263)
In a message dated 4/13/99 11:13:19 AM Eastern Daylight Time,
lkallus@earthlink.net writes:

<<

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From: Damian Trownson <DrPaulBear at xtra.co.nz> on 1999.04.14 at 08:22:46(3264)
Lester Kallus wrote:
>
> There's a new request for an ID on the ID site. The inflorescence looks
> something like a paeoniifolius to me, but if it's growing in central
> Kentucky, I find it hard to believe it would be hardy and naturalizing.
>
> Anyway, check out the image (small, but hopefully adequate) at:
> http://www.kallus.com/aroids/aroidid/id.html
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From: Sue <suez at northcoast.com> on 1999.04.14 at 14:55:34(3265)
Hello Nancy,

>I grew and flowered A. paeonifolius in the ground in central Ohio for over 20 years with no problems.<

I have a question for you about A. paeoniifolius even though I gave my
only nice 'big' bulb away to a friend thinking it was A. odoradus, then
couldn't take it back. I either got this one from Wilbert H., Dewey
Fisk. Shamefully I didn't mark that one with a name, so thank you
both! It was cearly marked as paeoniifolius mind you, but the mind was
saying the other three I have up and growing were paeoniifolius, and
that I had plenty when in reality they were odoradus. I had been
waiting for WELL over a year (going on two actually) for paeoniifolius
to start growing, and had been sheltering it inside for that long. I
had no idea it could be grown outside. It was still nice and firm when
I managed to find it a new home. Do you know what brings these out of
dormancy? Does it take a cold spell? I have been watering it off and on
for that long, but it didn't seem to respond to wet spells. Do you
recall if they like to be kept dry, wet or somewhere in between once
they do start growing so I can pass this on to my friend? I do have
some new little seeds from Allan Galloway (thanks Allan) to which I can
apply this information also. I have yet to see this plant.

There is also a question about A. odoradus that I would like to put up
to the list. The three plants I have growing from Wilbert (thank you
Wilbert, they are beautiful!), are 2' tall with a leaf span of 2 1/2' if
the leaves would spread out like I think they should, and this is the
question. They are tending to curl under even though they have grown
out of 6" pots and into 1 gallon pots this season. These are growing
inside, and reach slightly toward the nearest window. The leaves are
cuplike to the underside. Do the leaves naturally curl under? Can
these be grown outside in zone 9?

Thank you all,
Sue Zunino

From: Krzysztof Kozminski <kk at netgate.net> on 1999.04.16 at 09:13:19(3271)
On Wed, 14 Apr 1999 Mitsukiwi@aol.com wrote:

> In a message dated 4/13/99 11:13:19 AM Eastern Daylight Time,
> lkallus@earthlink.net writes:
>

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From: Lester Kallus <lkallus at earthlink.net> on 1999.04.16 at 13:14:08(3272)
Consider the confusion to have come from chronic sleep deprivation on an
uninformed mind. Now that I've been informed of the true ID, I clearly see
what it is.

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From: Wilbert Hetterscheid <hetter at vkc.nl> on 1999.04.19 at 08:59:55(3277)
Dear Sue,

The curling of the leaves you mention is atypical and indicates a slight
distrubance in development. This may happen with the leaves when the
atmosphere is too dry or too sunny or too cold, or when the potting soil
is too dry during unfolding. Maybe there are more reasons but these are
common ones. Take your pick!

Cheers,
Wilbert

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From: Sue <suez at northcoast.com> on 1999.04.19 at 15:20:18(3281)
Dear Wilbert,

Thank you very much for this. I was going to either drown them, or bake
them. I wasn't sure which to do. They aren't too bad, but they don't
look normal either. They were VERY cramped in the 6" pots, so probably
didn't get enough moisture while unfurling, not to mention their being
in the house with little moisture in the air. If I knew that I could
put them in the greenhouse right now, I would do that so they could get
more humidity, but I'm not sure of their low temp. tolerances. It
probably still gets down to around 50 in there at night, but it's
warming up fast. They are very nice plants this year. They at least
doubled in size.

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From: Victor Soukup <soukupvg at email.uc.edu> on 1999.04.20 at 10:54:02(3282)
Les,
There are two Dracunculus species, both essentially Mediterranean: D.
canariensis from far southwestern Europe and the Canary Islands and the
species figuring in the current debate, D. vulgaris, from SE to SW Europe.
Neither occurs naturally in North America. From the discussion of about
six months ago, you will remember that D. canariensis is tender and will
not stand temepratures much below freezing point, and those only at wide
intervals. D. vulgaris is rather commonly planted in this area (Cincinnati
-- Southwestern Ohio on the Ohio River) and seems to be hardy. We seldom
have snow cover and have on rare occasions (1977-78) had three days of -23
degrees F with days only at -10. It is thus quite inconceivable that the
plant in question is anything but D. vulgaris, in spite of the poor quality
of the photos. Of the "hardy" Amorphophallus species, only A. konjac,
supposedly the hardiest, will with proper siting and as necessary winter
protection, over winter here.

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