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  Anthurium
From: Robert H Arias <rharias at juno.com> on 1999.05.09 at 11:09:42(3339)
Hi everyone.
My name is Robert Arias rharias@juno.com
This is my first e-mail to aroid-l.
Some of you already know me as the editor of the Aroid Club of Tampa
Bay's newsletter, "The Spathifile".
I've been trying to put together a list of all the aroids for our members
and I've come across a few problems that I need a little help with.
The first problems are in Anthurium.
What am I to do with Anthurium grande
Which is valid:
Anthurium grande N. E. Br. 1905
Anthurium grande Sod. 1905
Anthurium grande hort. Bull ex Gard. Chron 1865
and what do I do with the others.
Next one:
Anthurium palmatifidum Van Houtte ex Schott 1865
Anthurium palmatifidum Lem. 1846
Also, what is going on with Anthurium scandens?
I've been out of touch living in my own small world when someone
shattered my reality by saying that this name may be invalid.
Please inform me of this.
I'm sure you'll be "hearing" more questions from me in the near future.
Thank You.
Robert Arias
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From: Neil Carroll <zzamia at hargray.com> on 1999.05.09 at 12:30:30(3340)
At 01:10 PM 5/9/99 -0500, you wrote:
>Hi everyone.
>My name is Robert Arias rharias@juno.com
>This is my first e-mail to aroid-l.
>Some of you already know me as the editor of the Aroid Club of Tampa
>Bay's newsletter, "The Spathifile".
>I've been trying to put together a list of all the aroids for our members
>and I've come across a few problems that I need a little help with.
>The first problems are in Anthurium.
>What am I to do with Anthurium grande
>Which is valid:
>Anthurium grande N. E. Br. 1905
>Anthurium grande Sod. 1905
>Anthurium grande hort. Bull ex Gard. Chron 1865
>and what do I do with the others.

robert, I would say the Anthurium grande N. E. Br. 1905 is the legitimate
name.

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From: "Susan Cooper" <SCooper at cooperpower.com> on 1999.05.10 at 09:13:21(3343)
Hi and Welcome Robert.
I didn't know there was an Aroid Club anywhere. Could you please post to the list how someone might join,
or get a newsletter?
Ditto for other Aroid clubs.
Thanks
Susan
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From: plantnut at macconnect.com (Dewey Fisk) on 1999.05.17 at 11:02:59(3362)
Susan,
Oh yes, there is an International Aroid Society! Go to
for more information. We would like to have
you as a member. We publish a quarterly Newsletter and an annual
scientific journal "Aroideana". The Society has been active for over
twenty years. If you have further questions, would be glad to answer.
Send me a private e-mail.
Dewey Fisk
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From: "Peter Wunderlin" <pmdes at iafrica.com> on 1999.05.31 at 20:16:44(3407)
Hi everybody,
I received a climbing Anthurium plant with a leaf form very typical of a
Schefflera.
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From: Aroideae at aol.com on 1999.06.03 at 07:11:42(3409)
Hi Peter,

Anthurium eminens reminds me of Schefflera. I don't know if there's a climber
in the latter genus, but you'll know when it blooms!!

Best,
Lynn Hannon

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From: Neil Carroll <zzamia at hargray.com> on 1999.06.03 at 09:03:27(3410)
At 10:17 PM 5/31/99 -0500, you wrote:
> Hi everybody,
>I received a climbing Anthurium plant with a leaf form very typical of a
>Schefflera.
>Is there such a plant or is there a climbing Schefflera?
>If anybody could enlighten me on this it would be great.
>Many Thanks
>Peter
>

Peter, There are a few anthurium species this could be. Some of the
possibilities are as follows:

A. croatii, A. eminens, A. polyschistum, A. polydactylum, A. kunthii and a
couple others that have palmatly divided leaves where the leaflets are
divided all the way back to the point of petiole attachment giving the leaf
the 'look' of schefflera. Schefflera is a woody plant where anthuriums are
herbaceous. Anthuriums also have a collective vein along or near the margin
of the leaf or leaflets.

Neil c.

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From: Dean Sliger <deanslgr at kode.net> on 1999.06.03 at 09:08:46(3411)
Peter Wunderlin wrote:

> Hi everybody,
> I received a climbing Anthurium plant with a leaf form very typical of a
> Schefflera.

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From: George Yao <gcyao at netasia.net> on 1999.06.03 at 09:14:13(3412)
Hi Peter,

We have an endemic Schefflera here in the Philippines that is a climbing
semi-woody vine. The English name here is "five-fingers", because of the 5
to 7 leaflets. Its scientific name is Schefflera odorata.

George

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From: plantnut at macconnect.com (Dewey Fisk) on 1999.06.03 at 09:28:42(3415)
Peter,
There are several that have palmate foliage.... and.... I have never seen
a climbing Schefflera.
Dewey

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From: Neil Carroll zzamia at hargray.com> on 2002.04.25 at 13:38:52(8635)
Can anyone help this person?

Neil

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From: "Wilbert Hetterscheid" hetter at worldonline.nl> on 2002.04.26 at 09:10:16(8650)
Neil,

Best
way would be to make contact with the Floricultural Resaecrh Station in
Aalsmeer, The Netherlands: tel. (31)297352525/fax (31)297352270 and ask for
information on Anthurium. They have done several years of research into
Anthurium, more specifically the Andreanum Group cultivars. Exactly what they
investigated I dunno but it's worth a try. There are also research reports
available there.

Cheerio,
Wilbert

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From: "Clarence Hammer" chammer at cfl.rr.com> on 2003.09.27 at 11:36:41(10642)
Anyone know anything about Anthurium
coloconium? Friend of mine bought one
at the Aroid show.

Russ

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From: Harry Witmore harrywitmore at witmore.net> on 2003.09.27 at 13:15:16(10643)
I6t's a large growing Anthurium with pendant leaves as it gets older. I
have to fight slugs constantly with this one the get a nice leaf. It's
really easy to grow for me though

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From: Harry Witmore harrywitmore at witmore.net> on 2003.09.27 at 14:58:53(10644)
I wish I could type!

At 04:15 PM 9/27/2003 -0400, you wrote:

I6t's a large growing Anthurium with pendant leaves as it gets older. I
have to fight slugs constantly with this one the get a nice leaf. It's
really easy to grow for me though

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From: "Clarence Hammer" chammer at cfl.rr.com> on 2003.09.27 at 16:53:39(10645)
Thanks Harry, I'll pass that info on to my
friend.

Anyone else have anything to add about

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From: Thomas.Croat at mobot.org on 2003.09.29 at 10:34:20(10656)
Dear Russ:

See my photos Fig. 88, 89 & 93 in the Anthurium sect. Pachyneurium revision
(Ann. Missouri Bot. Gard. 78:539-855.1991. It is available in print or you
may see it on the IAS webpages. It is an atypical Pachyneurium with a
cordate leaf base and a apathe that becomes broad and twisted in age.

Tom

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From: "Clarence Hammer" chammer at cfl.rr.com> on 2003.09.29 at 17:51:40(10658)
Thanks Tom, I'll have a look at that reference. Appreciate the info.

Russ
-----

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From: "D. Christopher Rogers" crogers at ecoanalysts.com> on 2006.11.14 at 09:34:05(14810)







Dear Tom,



Thank you for the advice. Anthurium is a new interest of mine, as I
typically have been focused on the tuber bearing aroids (Amorphophallus,
Dracontium, Anchomanes, Cryptocorne, Arum, Typhonium, etc.) But, I am pleased
that my Anthurium harrisi has just pushed out its first flower.



I am trying to keep the light levels the same as what the parent plant
has. The parent is in a whitewashed greenhouse under a canopy of tree ferns,
orchids and Monstera. The leaves on the parent are nearly black with silvery
white veins. The two ‘babies’ came from the base of the main stem, where there
was very little light penetration, and these leaves are very pale green. So, I
am a little concerned about them being burned. I have them under my son’s
orchid bench, in a high humidity (80%) environment, with the orchids that need
low light conditions. So, as our winter sets in, temperatures in my greenhouse run
from 12 degrees C at night to 26 degrees C during the day. I am installing a
propane heater that will keep the temperatures a bit higher. Any further
comments or suggestions?



Thanks,

Christopher



AUTOTEXTLIST \s "E-mail Signature"
D. Christopher Rogers
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From: "Tom Croat" Thomas.Croat at mobot.org> on 2006.11.17 at 14:34:27(14815)



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From: "D. Christopher Rogers" crogers at ecoanalysts.com> on 2006.11.20 at 13:26:30(14816)



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From: Skip Hanson shanson at emc.com> on 2006.11.21 at 07:25:00(14817)
?

Chris,
I have been using a "self venting" propane heater in
my 8x12 greenhouse for years without any ill
effects on my Aroids. However, I noticed a few years
ago that my orchid flower buds were turning
black and falling off. I started moving more air
around with a few fans and added an attic vent.
It's
nice and cozy and no problems. I keep the temp
around 68 F throughout the Winter here in Northern
CA. I don't grow many Anth. that can't take
less than 70 F...bunch of wimps [:).

Happy Thanksgiving,
Skip

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From: "Tom Croat" Thomas.Croat at mobot.org> on 2006.11.21 at 18:50:54(14823)


Chris:
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From: piaba <piabinha at yahoo.com> on 2009.05.20 at 11:18:57(19334)
do anthuriums ever divide vegetatively by growing a side crown or a runner?

=======tsuh yang

_______________________________________________

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From: "Sherry Gates" <TheTropix at msn.com> on 2009.05.20 at 14:14:15(19335)
Hi Tsuh,

I have an Anthurium (bought as A. dussii), that has had it kind of rough the last few months, but it's hanging in there. (Hurricanes Rita & Ike (Ike was the final straw) pretty much ruined our home and part of the greenhouse & shade houses). We bought a house this past Jan. Now I'm in the southern end of zone 8. About a week ago it started sending up 2 growths from below the soil line. I have others that grew a 'side crown' like you mentioned. The first one that comes to mind like that is the Anthurium watermaliense. I divided it and they're both doing great. The mama plant is about 3 ft tall (at top of foliage) and the largest leaf is about 20 inches (50.8 cm) long and 9 inches wide (22.9 cm). Come to think of it I have an A. schlechtendalii that also had a side growth (from below the soil line) that I divided as well and all are fine. I even got 2 seedlings out of the tangle of roots when it was separated. Most of the other Anthuriums have not multiplied... yet! But I'm certainly hopeful! Do you have one that is sending up the secondary growth you were asking about?

Best of luck,

Sherry

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From: ExoticRainforest <Steve at ExoticRainforest.com> on 2009.05.20 at 14:16:18(19336)
Yes they do.

Hope you are well. How is your collection growing?

Steve Lucas

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From: Michael Pascall <mickpascall at hotmail.com> on 2009.05.20 at 15:15:57(19337)
They sure do . I have a nice dark leafed hybrid that suckers like crazy .
It looks a little like crystallinum .

Michael Pascall,

> Date: Wed, 20 May 2009 11:18:57 -0700
> From: piabinha@yahoo.com

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From: Sheldon Hatheway <sfhatheway at yahoo.com> on 2009.05.20 at 17:05:07(19339)
Dear Tsuh Yang

I've only grown A. andreanum, A. scherzerianum, and A. clarinervium so far. All of them have put out side shoots which I detached and rooted after the new shoot had grown a few inches. Although they did put out the side shoots, it didn't happen as often as I would have liked (with the exception of my A. andreanum, which I think was grown from tissue culture, and it does nothing BUT put out side shoots. One in particular has so many side shoots coming out, it looks like a pin cushion!! The problem with it is that it is making so many shoots that none of them grow very vigorously.

Sheldon Hatheway

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From: "Christopher Rogers" <CRogers at ecoanalysts.com> on 2009.05.20 at 18:49:56(19341)
Yes!

D. Christopher Rogers

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From: piabinha at yahoo.com on 2009.05.21 at 11:06:41(19347)
thanks for all the responses.

i don't have many anthuria but they seem reluctant to propagate vegetatively, at least mine, compared to other genera. currently i'm only growing stenophyllum and faustino-mirandae, and i've had the steno for a long time and wanted to propagate it to give away. but it hasn't done it. i wonder if the crown gets injured, would that stimulate further division?

come to think of it, i think i had a bird's nest-type that did make several crowns before. are the bird's nest more likely to do this?

sheldon, if you divide them, they'll grow better, i'm sure.

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From: Michael Pascall <mickpascall at hotmail.com> on 2009.05.23 at 02:34:02(19352)
Once mature and a few years old , many Anthuriums develop a tall 'trunk' .
These can be cut up , and sprouts will usually form .
A few months ago , I was forced to chop off the top of a very large Anthurium atropurpureum , as it was to top heavy . Now I have some vigorous sprouts forming on the 50 cm [ 20 "] tall stump I left in the 30 cm [ 12"] tub it was growing in . By spring these should have developed roots of there own, and I should be able to remove them .
Then,  maybe the stump will produce a few more sprouts

Michael Pascall,

> Date: Thu, 21 May 2009 11:06:41 -0700
> From: piabinha@yahoo.com

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From: "Marcus Nadruz" <mnadruz at jbrj.gov.br> on 2009.09.16 at 06:21:16(20033)

Dear friends, does anyone know the name of this species of Anthurium? This photo was taken in Colombia. Thank you.

Marcus A. Nadruz Coelho
Pesquisador Titular III
Diretoria de Pesquisas
Instituto de Pesquisas Jardim Botanico do Rio de
Janeiro/MMA
21 32042144
(http://www.jbrj.gov.br)

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From: "Marek Argent" <abri1973 at wp.pl> on 2009.09.17 at 12:44:02(20037)
Hello,

The best known Anthurium species with almost a black spathe

is A. watermaliense, but inflorescences on the web are variable.

Type the name in Google picture search, you'll find identical plants and much different ones.

For example the inflorescence in the IAS page differs very much

http://www.aroid.org/genera/anthurium/pachyneurinum/watermal.php

Best,

Marek

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From: Don Bittel <donbit121 at hotmail.com> on 2009.09.17 at 20:26:13(20039)
marcus,
   this is definitely not watermaliense, but is cabrerense, the true black anthurium. I have kept one alive thru the hot summer here in Florida, which is not easy.
 
Don Bittel

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From: "Denis Rotolante" <denis at skg.com> on 2009.09.18 at 07:26:28(20040)
Nice picture!

This black spathed anthurium is not an A. watermaliense. the spathe is too broad and the spadix is curved in a relaxed sort of way. This is perhaps the famous "Black Anthurium", a member of the Calomystrium Group with the andraeanum types. It originates high in the cloud forests of the Andes Mountains in Colobia and does not do well in sub tropical & tropical sea level environments. I've heard it referred to as Anthurium rubrum although I have never seen it described as such in an article. It will hybridize with other calomystrium types if you can get it to grow in your greenhouse and flower, alas I can not.

Denis

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From: "Marek Argent" <abri1973 at wp.pl> on 2009.09.19 at 13:00:50(20049)
Hello,

So is this also not A. watermaliense?

http://www.wschowa.com/abrimaal/araceum/anthurium/water.htm

Marek

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From: piaba <piabinha at yahoo.com> on 2009.09.22 at 11:36:11(20062)
marek, that is correct. that is not watermaliense, which has a very small, much narrower spathe.

=========
tsuh yang

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