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  Monstera Fruit
From: StellrJ at aol.com on 1999.07.11 at 21:29:27(3494)
Today, I was in the food co-op on the east side of Olympia, Washington. It
was the last place I ever expected to see Mostera deliciosa fruits, but there
they were--the name translated to "Delicious Monster Fruit." Well, since
this is a fruit I have long daydreamed of one day tasting, I "seized the day"
and bought one, even though, at $5.45 each, they were more than I would
normally shell out for produce.

Attached to each fruit with a rubber band were instructions from the grower
(an organic farm in Florida) on how to use the fruit. They said to put the
fruit in an empty jar, stem end up, and wait for the green scales to fall off
and reveal a white core. Twice they pointed out that this must happen on the
fruits own accord, without human help (presumably because of calcium
oxalate). Well, I have followed those instructions, and the fruit sits in
its jar on a shelf in my bedroom. Does anyone else have experience with this
fruit, to tell me if there is anything else I need to do? At that price, I
cannot afford to let it go to waste.

Jason Hernandez

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From: "Julius Boos" <ju-bo at email.msn.com> on 1999.07.13 at 09:25:55(3495)
>>Today, I was in the food co-op on the east side of Olympia, Washington.
It
was the last place I ever expected to see Mostera deliciosa fruits, but
there
they were--the name translated to "Delicious Monster Fruit." Well, since
this is a fruit I have long daydreamed of one day tasting, I "seized the
day"
and bought one, even though, at $5.45 each, they were more than I would
normally shell out for produce.

Attached to each fruit with a rubber band were instructions from the grower
(an organic farm in Florida) on how to use the fruit. They said to put the
fruit in an empty jar, stem end up, and wait for the green scales to fall
off
and reveal a white core. Twice they pointed out that this must happen on
the
fruits own accord, without human help (presumably because of calcium
oxalate). Well, I have followed those instructions, and the fruit sits in
its jar on a shelf in my bedroom. Does anyone else have experience with
this
fruit, to tell me if there is anything else I need to do? At that price, I
cannot afford to let it go to waste.<

Jason--
Try wrapping the entire thing loosly in plastic wrap ('Saran Wrap'), but
loose enough for you to see when the 'scales' begin to loosen at the stem
end (this begins at that end), unwrap, and enjoy! The flesh should be a
shiny cream/white as the scales come off, but fruit MAY have been picked too
'green', let us know how it turns out! Very interesting
taste/texture/flavor!! Look out for a few LARGE seed (1/2-3/4") and sow
any you find, they grow beautifully!
Good luck--
Julius

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From: Regferns at aol.com on 1999.07.13 at 09:31:47(3496)
Jason,

Here in South Florida they grow quite well. I have an area landscaped with
them and right now they are in their "fruit" producing mode. The one bad
thing about them is that when they ripen, many of them will ripen at the same
time giving off a sickening sweet aroma. Sometimes there are too many of
them and so I have begun using them to feed my large specimens of ferns. The
fruit decomposes and the ferns don't seem to mind. I have not noticed any
appreciable differences in the growth of the plants because they are always
being fertilized with other nutrients, but why let good organic material go
to waste?.

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From: Don Martinson <llmen at execpc.com> on 1999.07.13 at 09:38:29(3498)
>Today, I was in the food co-op on the east side of Olympia, Washington. It
>was the last place I ever expected to see Mostera deliciosa fruits, but there
>they were--the name translated to "Delicious Monster Fruit." Does anyone
>else have experience with this
>fruit, to tell me if there is anything else I need to do? At that price, I
>cannot afford to let it go to waste.
>
>Jason Hernandez
>Naturalist-at-Large

Hi Jason,

My experience with Monstera was from when I was in graduate school and one
of the large plants flowered in the Marquette University greenhouse.

The instructions were correct regarding waiting for the green "scales" (I'm
sure there's a horticultural term for these) to begin falling off to
indicate the fruit is ripe. The pulp underneath will be quite soft - very
much like a ripe bananna in texture ( and taste, too).
I can't give you much help on how long it will take the fruit to ripen,
since I don't know how "green" these were when picked. I'm wondering if
placing it in a bag with a ripe apple (which produces ethylene gas) might
hasten the ripening process. By my recollection, the ripening on the plant
took some time.

Good Luck and bon app?tit!

Don Martinson

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From: StellrJ at aol.com on 1999.07.13 at 09:41:49(3499)
Okay, the fruit began to show loosening scales yesterday evening (Sunday,
July 11), along with an exquisite fragrance reminiscent of carambola. After
I went to bed that night, I could hear scales dropping off in small groups.
This morning (July 12), the fruit was about one-third peeled, revealing a
mealy-looking white surface beneath the scales. Since I live within easy
walking distance of my workplace, I checked it again at noon today, finding
it about half peeled. When I returned home in the afternoon, the fruit had
shed about two-thirds of its scales, and its fragrance filled my entire
bedroom. I write this about 10:30 at night, after having just eaten the
now-completely ripened fruit for dessert. Once all the scales were gone,
there was what looked a bit like a white ear of corn, but very easily
bruised by the touch. It was eaten like corn on the cob--I bit off the outer
layer, apparently an aggregate of fruitlets, revealing a hard, woody "cob" in
the center. Mixed in with the yellowish-white flesh were some strange,
blackish flakes, which I ignored. The fruit was exquisitely sweet, with an
exotic flavor I cannot describe in words. Truly, my years of longing have
not been disappointed!!

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From: "Craig M. Allen" <cm_allen at yahoo.com> on 1999.07.14 at 14:42:11(3502)
I have eaten a few from the plants here at Fairchild Garden. They ripen slowly,
and each fruit only has a small section that ripens each day. I was also told
to eat only the part from which the scales fell on their own, and that seemed
to be just a few inches per day.

Hope this helps,
Craig M. Allen

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From: "Julius Boos" <ju-bo at email.msn.com> on 1999.07.14 at 22:00:59(3509)
Dear Craig and friends,
To get more fruit ready for enjoying at the same time, wrap the fruit in
saran wrap, it will then all ripen at the same time and all the scales will
fall of symultaneously!
Julius

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