IAS Aroid Quasi Forum

About Aroid-L
 This is a continuously updated archive of the Aroid-L mailing list in a forum format - not an actual Forum. If you want to post, you will still need to register for the Aroid-L mailing list and send your postings by e-mail for moderation in the normal way.

  Styrofoam cones for winter protection
From: Lester Kallus lkallus at earthlink.net> on 1999.09.08 at 15:50:23(3628)
I'm not sure if I read about winter protection in this listserver or the Zingiber listserver. Somewhere, I heard of some Styrofoam-like material that was cone shaped and was placed over a tender plant to add winter protection. Reportedly it added a zone or 2 of winter tolerance.

I've looked in the local Home Depot, local Hardware store, a couple nurseries and have even called a plastic pot wholesaler but can't come up with any information.

Does anyone have any experience with these and if so, does anyone know of a supplier so that I can get the local nursery to purchase a mass of them?

Thanks,
Les

From: Ellen Hornig hornig at Oswego.EDU> on 1999.09.09 at 07:34:01(3630)
Les - the styrofoam cones to which you refer are sold locally as "rose
cones", and can be found in pretty much every garden center, Kmart,
WalMart and similar. I assume you're just too far south for the local
stores to offer these-

Ellen

+More
From: Dean Sliger deanslgr at kode.net> on 1999.09.09 at 07:38:26(3631)
Lester Kallus wrote:

> Does anyone have any experience with these and if so, does anyone know of a supplier so that I can get the local nursery to purchase a mass of them?

Les,

Those are commonly used for roses, usually sold as "rose cones." I imagine they're a seasonal product, though I can't imagine that those places you mentioned haven't even heard of them. Try looking later this month or on October; they're usually everywhere, come in different sizes.

Dean Sliger

+More
From: Don Martinson llmen at execpc.com> on 1999.09.09 at 07:42:40(3632)
>I'm not sure if I read about winter protection in this listserver or the
>Zingiber listserver. Somewhere, I heard of some Styrofoam-like material
>that was cone shaped and was placed over a tender plant to add winter
>protection. Reportedly it added a zone or 2 of winter tolerance.

Les...

Those things are quite common up here in the Great White North come fall.
They are commonly called Rose cones, as they are commonly placed over roses
for winter protection. A problem that most folks have is that in the
warmer days of late winter (i.e. March) they can heat up inside and cause
mold problems. This can be ameliorated somewhat by poking holes in the top
for heat to escape. They are also quite light weight and must be weighted
down by a brick or stone. I prefer to use a tall bushel basket type of
thing commonly called a bean hamper (hard to find and I'm dating myself by
even remembering when beans were sold in these things).

I can't see that they would be any better than a good layering of mulch
unless one has some above ground growth you wish to protect. As far as
giving a zone or 2 of protection, I'd be dubious, since these don't
actually provide any warmth (except as noted above), only provide
protection against drying winds and frost heaving.

Don

+More
From: IntarsiaCo at aol.com on 1999.09.09 at 07:49:25(3634)
Les,
They are called rose cones. They come in several sizes. Try AGWAY. You can
also use those cheap styrofoam coolers.
Regards,
Mark Mazer

From: JRugh1 at aol.com on 1999.09.09 at 07:52:41(3635)
Sure, they are Rose protectors. I am not sure where you are located, but
here in New England they are common but very seasonal. They arrive at the
nurseries, Wall Marts and Home Depots late in the fall. I doubt if you could
find one now. Several of the big mail order nurseries also carry them. I
have used them to get small rhodies though early years. They seem to work.
Some come with wire pins to hold them down, cheaper ones don't have pins. A
similar item consists of strips of wavy plastic that clips together to form a
ring. You place this 12" high ring around the plant and fill with mulch. I
have clipped two together to make a very large ring for marginally small
shrubs.

+More
From: Lester Kallus lkallus at earthlink.net> on 1999.09.11 at 18:11:55(3639)
Thanks, all, for the response. I'll check a couple garden centers but although I live in 7a and although it does get downright chilly around here, I can say that I've never seen anything even remotely like what's been described at any of the stores here on Long Island.

Perhaps with sufficient nagging, I can change that.

The next question is: will these truly work to help borderline hardy material survive the winter? Although Colocasia esculenta and Alocasia macrorrhiza have been reported to be hardy around here, I've see nearly all of them turn into compost (except the couple that were planted adjacent to my previously heat-leaking house. I was hoping to leave some of that material in the ground to cut down on both the fall work of bringing everything in and the spring work of replanting. I've also read that Colocasia antiquorum *should* be hardy here (but also turns into compost). I do have sandy soil and the compost isn't a terrible addition, but I can think of cheaper sources for the organic material.

Les

+More
From: Al Wootten awootten at NRAO.EDU> on 1999.09.13 at 08:46:20(3646)
Lester Kallus writes:
> Thanks, all, for the response. I'll check a couple garden centers but although I live in 7a and although it does get downright chilly around here, I can say that I've never seen anything even remotely like what's been described at any of the stores here on Long Island.
>
> Perhaps with sufficient nagging, I can change that.
>
> The next question is: will these truly work to help borderline hardy material survive the winter? Although Colocasia esculenta and Alocasia macrorrhiza have been reported to be hardy around here, I've see nearly all of them turn into compost (except the couple that were planted adjacent to my previously heat-leaking house. I was hoping to leave some of that material in the ground to cut down on both the fall work of bringing everything in and the spring work of replanting. I've also read that Colocasia antiquorum *should* be hardy here (but also turns into compost). I do have sandy soil and the compost isn't a terrible addition, but I can think of cheaper sources for the organic material.
I have both Colocasia esculenta and Alocasia macrorrhiza at my house.
This is within 200 feet of the Rappahannock River at its confluence
with the Chesapeake Bay, so the winters are very moderate--oleander survives
most winters without dieback. The soil is sandy. I've found that although
the Colocasia survives, mostly it seems to be buds on the sides of the
larger corm which return the following year--the larger corm usually turns
pretty much to mush. Alocasia vanished entirely last year but I have a
few very small bits of it beginning to come back. I won't leave either one
out for a second winter; the Alocasia would, I feel, not survive a second
winter. Various Calla lilies seem to overwinter very nicely (ditto Canna).

Clear skies,
Al

+More
From: Jmh98law at aol.com on 1999.09.14 at 22:06:27(3651)
Having checked with the local Home Depot garden center, I've learned the
following that may help any of those who wish to try these:

The large size of "rose cones" [labeled "Plant Protector"] costs $2.36/each

Home Depot's stock # is: 153647

Home Depot here usually will order in a stock item, even though the store
does not carry it. Those who wish to try this, who have a Home Depot
nearby, may be able to obtain these.

I've also bought them at Ace Hardware. Using the term "Plant Protector", you
may be able to have your local Ace order them if you have no Home Depot
nearby.

+More
Note: this is a very old post, so no reply function is available.