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From: Don Martinson llmen at execpc.com> on 2000.02.02 at 07:49:01(4039)
Hi everyone,

I just returned from a trip to Tahiti and Moorea. My exploration time was
limited, but in addition to the all-present Colocasia and Xanthosoma, I
happened upon what is presumably an Amorphophallus species. It resembles
A. konjac except that it has noticable tubercles on the petiole, there are
numerous (well, 3) leaves present at the same time, and the leaf surface is
more glossy.

I've asked Les to put them on the Aroid ID Web Site, but in the meantime,
you can view them at:

http://www.execpc.com/~llmen/mooreamorpho1.jpg note tubercles on petiole
http://www.execpc.com/~llmen/mooreamorpho2.jpg note multiple petioles
http://www.execpc.com/~llmen/mooreamorpho3.jpg note shiny leaf surface

Suggestions anyone?

Don Martinson

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From: "Alan Galloway" alan at unity.ncsu.edu> on 2000.02.02 at 09:27:43(4041)
On Feb 2, 9:50am, Don Martinson wrote:
> Subject: ID needed

> I happened upon what is presumably an Amorphophallus species. It resembles
> A. konjac except that it has noticable tubercles on the petiole, there are
> numerous (well, 3) leaves present at the same time, and the leaf surface is
> more glossy.
>
> I've asked Les to put them on the Aroid ID Web Site, but in the meantime,
> you can view them at:
>
> http://www.execpc.com/~llmen/mooreamorpho1.jpg note tubercles on petiole
> http://www.execpc.com/~llmen/mooreamorpho2.jpg note multiple petioles
> http://www.execpc.com/~llmen/mooreamorpho3.jpg note shiny leaf surface
>
> Suggestions anyone?
>

Don,

Sure looks like A. paeoniifolius to me.

Alan

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From: Laufle at aol.com on 2000.02.02 at 11:20:04(4042)
Hi,

I live in LaCrosse, and I'm new to the world of arisaema (I hope I spelled
that correctly!). I suscribed to the message boards of something-or-other,
and I get the letters from people like you. Most of the info is over my
head, but I'm learning!

I was wondering how long you've been studying these types of plants, how you
cultivate them in Wisconsin, and how you bacame interested in them in the
first place.

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From: Krzysztof Kozminski kk at netgate.net> on 2000.02.02 at 11:39:10(4043)
On Wed, 2 Feb 2000, Don Martinson wrote:

> Hi everyone,
>
> I just returned from a trip to Tahiti and Moorea. My exploration time was
> limited, but in addition to the all-present Colocasia and Xanthosoma, I
> happened upon what is presumably an Amorphophallus species. It resembles
> A. konjac except that it has noticable tubercles on the petiole, there are
> numerous (well, 3) leaves present at the same time, and the leaf surface is
> more glossy.

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From: "Hetterscheid, W." Hetter at Plantscope.nl> on 2000.02.04 at 07:23:45(4046)
Dear Don,

It is Amorphophallus paeoniifolius. Near-unique in the genus for its rough
petioles (others with that: opertus, scaber, koratensis).

Cheers,
Wilbert

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From: Cyndikrall at aol.com on 2008.09.11 at 16:57:35(18499)

Does anyone know what this plant is? Found it at a local garden center. Sorry for the blurry pic of the bloom!

Cyndi

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From: "Christopher Rogers" <crogers at ecoanalysts.com> on 2008.09.12 at 05:06:17(18505)

Hiyer!

Looks like Alocasia gageana bywhat I can see of the inflorescences. I have attached pictures of one of myspecimens for comparison. This species is a good temperate Alocasia, and growswell out doors where the temperature does not drop below freezing very often (morningfrosts one or two months a year).

Here we can have the temperaturedrop below freezing for a week or two at a time, and my plants just go dormant,lose most of their leaves, and look lousy until late spring. They seem toprefer bright shade with either morning or evening direct sun, and a fairamount of humidity during the growing season. Outdoors I have grown them to twometers in height with leaves around a meter in length. In my greenhouse thegrowth is far more rapid, with the leaves a bit larger.

This plant is easily confusedwith A. macrorhiza (in our area macrorhiza rarely gets more than two meters inheight unless in a greenhouse) , which has a yellow spathe that reflexes awayfrom the spadix, and A. odora, which has an erect yellow spathe, as opposed tothe green spathe on gageana.

Happy days,

Christopher

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From: Sheldon Hatheway <sfhatheway at yahoo.com> on 2008.09.12 at 08:11:33(18509)
Cyndi,

Looks like an Alocasia - perhaps macrorhiza?

Sheldon

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From: Cyndikrall at aol.com on 2008.09.12 at 14:58:00(18519)
Thank you, Christopher! I do believe you are right! I got the plant out at a pond nursery over in Sonoma. The mother plant was a monster, just gorgeous. I knew I had to have it, lol. I'll mulch it real well over the winter, since I might be just a little colder than you.

Cyndi

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From: Cyndikrall at aol.com on 2008.09.12 at 14:59:24(18520)
Thanks, Sheldon...I think Christopher has it right, from what I can tell by googling some pics. The venation is a lot more pronounced than A. macrorhiza.

Cyndi

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