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  Anthurium divisions?
From: Dyeingduk at aol.com on 2000.04.25 at 20:05:47(4423)
Hi my name is paul and im new to this forum. Please excuse me if this is a
newbie question but i purchased an Anthurium pedatoradiatum(i bet i messed
up) and it has a fairly long "rhizome" with plenty of roots. I paid what i
would consider a little hefty but because i had never seen it before i got
it. anyways i was wondering if i can divide the rhizome and have it put out
another plant. i only thought of this because for some reason my main plant
of Anthurium christallinum died but put out many side shoots. just a thought
to get more from my money..thanks in advance for any advice.

Paul Marcellini

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From: Aroideae at aol.com on 2000.04.26 at 14:54:33(4429)
hi paul,

yes, this technique usually works very well on anthuriums. i usually take
the original pot, after making the top cutting, and put it in a sealed
plastic bag in the shade until new growth is initiated. this works well for
me. the point is to keep the humidity up without additional watering, to
prevent root rot.

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From: Denis denis at skg.com> on 2000.04.26 at 14:56:22(4431)
Anthurium pedatoradiatum, synonamous with A. clavigerum and also known
under several other names is a vining Anthurium which does not reach its
full potential until it is grown on a large totem pole (6 foot+) or a
tree trunk. Sure you can propagate it by chopping up the stem into short
segments with several nodes per each but you will miss out on all the
glorious beauty of this monster in its mature form.

Denis at Silver Krome Gardens
Homestead, Florida

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From: Neil Carroll zzamia at hargray.com> on 2000.04.26 at 17:27:34(4436)
> Anthurium pedatoradiatum, synonamous with A. clavigerum and also known
> under several other names is a vining Anthurium which does not reach its
> full potential until it is grown on a large totem pole (6 foot+) or a
> tree trunk.

Dennis, A. pedatoradiatum Schott is a valid speies seperate from A.
clavigerum Peopp.. Exoctica shows a picture of A. clavigerum labeled 'A.
panduratum' and aslo shows a picture of 'A. pedato-radiatum' a couple of
pages later which seems to be a correct label for that picture.

Neil

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From: "Don Bittel" dbittel at treco.net> on 2000.04.26 at 20:42:07(4443)
Denis,
Are you sure that pedato-radiatum is synonamous with clavigerum? My
pedatos have smaller leaves, upright inflorescences, and the leaf segments
are always joined at the base. The clavigerums are much different, getting
huge leaves to 6 feet across, have long hanging inflorescences that
resemble something from a donkey, and the leaf segments are almost
completely free at the base. I have bought clavigerum under several names
that all grow up to be clavigerum. But pedato-radiatum has never grown up
to be clavigerum.
I have also crossed pedato-radiatum with watermaliense, and vice versa.
The hybrids come out fantastic. But I have never been successful with a
clavigerum/ watermaliense cross. Any ideas?

Don

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From: Denis denis at skg.com> on 2000.04.27 at 16:36:25(4457)
You may be right, I will look into it.

Denis

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From: rharias at juno.com on 2000.04.28 at 17:51:13(4468)
Just to add a little to what Lynn posted:
Plant Anthurium seeds in groups of three or four to a very small cell
pack or small pot (2"-3"). Plants may produce their own natural chemicals
to ward off attacks by fungi. One small plant may not produce enough, and
too many plants together may provide too tempting a treat.
Anthuriums may require fungi in order to grow correctly. So using a broad
spectrum fungicide may, in the long run be detrimental to it developing.
Fertilizers seem to play a very large part in all of this. I have found
that seedlings that have been fertilized frequently rarely (if ever) will
succumb to fungal attacks.
So don't forget the fertilizer.
Also I've found that rats also favor young healthy anthurium seedlings.
So cover the seeds with a plastic tray cover (which will also provide
that extra humidity they like) so that the mice or bushy tailed rats
can't eat your babies.

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