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  Amorphophallus
From: plantnut at shadow.net (Dewey Fisk) on 1997.02.21 at 20:06:40(413)
Sun Bulb has a catalog in which they advertise "Amorphophallus bulbifer"
for the following prices...10 for $18.00, 25 for $37.50 and 50 for $60.00.
This is a great price and since Sun Bulb is a Wholesaler, you should be a
Nursery to order. However, I am sure that there is someone in the group
who has a commercial operation that will be willing to coordinate a 'group
purchase'. There is one good/bad thing with the identification of this
plant from Sun, some of the tubers are 'bulbifer' and some are not... They
get them in large bulk lots and the source does not care if they are
'bulbifer' or not... I think this is a good thing because there is a good
chance that you will get something other than bulbifer... The bad thing is
that you will not know what it is until, possibly, it blooms...

So, if anyone is interested in organizing a purchase, contact me direct and
I will give you the address... If anyone is interested in purchasing...
put it on aroid-l so that the organizer will know who you are....

One thing more.... The organizer will add a little to the above prices to
cover his/her time and expenses. However, the price should still be
'right' for what you get...

Dewey

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From: "NAME \"Wilbert Hetterscheid\"" <W.HETTER at pbga.agro.nl> on 1997.02.22 at 07:07:38(417)
If you buy Amorphophallus bulbifer from Sun Bulbs, the mixed-in species
is likely to be Am. napalensis. It's worth the gamble is some of you
don't have that last species..............

Wilbert

From: MJ <oneota at ames.net> on 1997.02.22 at 18:21:13(419)

OK, I'll go in with folk on an order from Sun Bulbs.
MJ Hatfield

From: "Carlo A. Balistrieri" <cabalist at facstaff.wisc.edu> on 1997.03.10 at 09:07:57(477)
Is anyone growing Amorphophallus aphyllus or eichleri? I'd like to
find these African A's if I can.

Carlo

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From: MJ Hatfield <oneota at ames.net> on 1997.06.05 at 12:22:20(800)
Two questions please.
One of my A.konjacs sprouted early and I planted it in a pot, it grew
too tall and I planted it outside. We had a cold, wicked spring and it
suffered, Now it only has a stalk left. Will it resprout? Should I dig
it up or leave it till fall? (zone 4)
The same thing happened with an A.bulbifer. It is still indoors, in a
pot, and very tall reaching for the sun. I would like to plant it
outdoors but fear the wind will take the stem (petiole) down. Could I
bury part of the stem to make the plant more stable? I know that some
plants don't mind having the stems buried and some react poorly
resulting ih death.
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From: plantnut at shadow.net (Dewey Fisk) on 1997.06.06 at 20:21:53(808)
Two new pictures have been added to the IAS Web Page under the Gallery
Section... Under Reggi Whitehead, take a look at Amorphophallus
sparsiflorus...
Dewey

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From: Mike Bordelon <BORDELON.MIKE at NMNH.SI.EDU> on 1997.08.06 at 06:58:21(1018)
Hello all,
I have an unknown species of Amorphophallus producing a
large bulbil on top of it's stem. I know A. bulbifer and A.
muelleri produce bulbils . Are there any other species of
Amorphophallus that do this?

Mike Bordelon

From: "NAME \"Wilbert Hetterscheid\"" <W.HETTER at pbga.agro.nl> on 1997.08.06 at 11:53:22(1019)
Dear Mike,

The way in which bulbifer and muelleri produce bulbils, as really on TOP of
the leaf axis, is unmatched by any other species BUT Am. yuloensis (China)
does imitate it pretty well. However the onset of the bulbil is IN the tissue
of the axis and not on TOP of it. later the epiderm of the axis ruptures
and exposes the corly tissue of the bulbil, which also starts to grow
strongly at its apex, thus appearing to be on top of the axis. A close look
will show that it is however embedded IN the axis with the base. Where
does your plant originate from?

Cheers, Wilbert

From: "Hoogma" <hoogma1 at stad.dsl.nl> on 1998.03.07 at 08:31:32(1940)
Hello Aroiders,

I'm a new Amorphophallus fanatic, I started with A. bulbifer, konjac and
odoratus.

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From: "Chris Read" exoticplants at hotmail.com> on 2001.03.29 at 08:53:26(6108)
Can anyone help?
Two of my (common) Amorphophallus sp have lost their labels
(very careless of them!)...anybody know what they might be?
1. - brown tuber, pink bud in the middle, produces loads of offsets
2. - pale yellowish-green tuber, slight bud in the middle (not very
noticeable), also quite prolific in terms of offsets.

I'm thinking they might be A. konjac (or A. bulbifer) & A. blumei
respectively...
Chris Read

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From: "Wilbert Hetterscheid" hetter at worldonline.nl> on 2001.03.29 at 13:25:51(6113)
Dear Chris,

I LOVE it: TWO tubers out of a potential 180 species, and you ask which ones
they are. You know, there IS a limit to magic!!!!!

Having said that, the #1 sounds like A. konjac, provided the offsets are on
long rhizomatous structures. Both bulbifer and muelleri (wrongly named
blumei by you, I guess......) have NO offset development. Maybe, the pale
one is krausei, provided you got it from me, directly or indirectly.

GOOD LUCK!!!

Wilbert

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From: Don Martinson llmen at execpc.com> on 2001.03.29 at 13:26:04(6114)
>Can anyone help?
> Two of my (common) Amorphophallus sp have lost their labels
>(very careless of them!)...anybody know what they might be?
> 1. - brown tuber, pink bud in the middle, produces loads of offsets
> 2. - pale yellowish-green tuber, slight bud in the middle (not very
>noticeable), also quite prolific in terms of offsets.
>
> I'm thinking they might be A. konjac (or A. bulbifer) & A. blumei
>respectively...
> Chris Read

Number (1) describes the appearance of my A. konjac tubers.

--
Don Martinson

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From: chee kin cheekin_55 at yahoo.com> on 2001.08.27 at 07:39:04(7306)
Hello to everyone,
I would like to ask if any one can help me start
my amorphohallus collection as recently i have only a
few spcies.i am trying very hard to collect this
plants but to no avail, so i would be glad if any one
can help me.Also, are there any student membership for
the Aroid Society as i am still a student ?
Thanks Everyone!

Chee Kin

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From: "Alan Galloway" alan_galloway at ncsu.edu> on 2001.10.19 at 12:58:09(7647)
Chris,
I'm Cc-ing my reply to the Aroid-l mailing list as I suspect there may
also me members on this list that can also offer some advice. If
you're not a member of this list, I would advise you to join....directions
can be found on the International Aroid Society's web page at:
www.aroid.org.

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From: "Ronald h Kessler" ronlene at worldnet.att.net> on 2002.03.23 at 19:21:15(8334)
I line in south Florida and along with many other tropicals, enjoy growing
Amorphophallus. I have the issue of Aroideana, which has great pictures of
the inflorescences, but I would like to find a source for photos of the
mature plants. Does such a book exist? If not, it probably should. Ron

From: "Wilbert Hetterscheid" hetter at worldonline.nl> on 2002.03.24 at 08:55:01(8339)
> I line in south Florida and along with many other tropicals,
> enjoy growing
> Amorphophallus. I have the issue of Aroideana, which has
> great pictures of
> the inflorescences, but I would like to find a source for
> photos of the
> mature plants.

What do you consider a "mature" plant? Certainly, when an Amorphophallus is
flowering it is "mature". Do you mean more pics of the leaves?

Does such a book exist?

No (at least I hope not, or I am doomed.....).

If not, it probably
> should.

I shall work on that.

Cheerio,
Wilbert

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From: "Ronald h Kessler" ronlene at worldnet.att.net> on 2002.03.24 at 11:26:19(8341)
Hi Wilbert, When your picture book of Amorphophallus leaves is ready, I'll
buy the first copy. Ron

----- Original Message -----

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From: Scott Hyndman hyndman at aroid.org> on 2002.03.26 at 19:10:05(8374)
I would like to know if anyone has any extra tubers of Amorphophallus of any
kind that can grow in St. Louis Missouri and tolerate a little cold and
would be willing to give them to a 13 year old Amorphophallus phreaque?

and if anyone has any tips on the best type of soil and fertiliser to put on
them!!?

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From: "Cooper, Susan L." SLCooper at scj.com> on 2002.04.01 at 08:25:16(8391)
I live in zone 5, and there are others on the list too. One of the great
things about Amorphophallus is that you can grow them outdoors in the
summer, and then dig up the tubers when they go dormant and bring them in
the house.
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From: Piabinha at aol.com on 2002.04.01 at 13:02:59(8399)
i have just had abyssinicus and albispathus go dormant. this is their second year growing in my apt.

tsuh yang

From: Lowell McCormick LOWELLMCCORMICK at compuserve.com> on 2003.07.30 at 17:45:44(10445)
Howdy all,

Last winter someone posted a message on the identity of an Amorpho
that produces bulbils on the top of the leaf like A. bulbifer, but the stem
is very dark green and light green vertical streaks. It also comes up
later in the spring than A. bulbifer. Can anyone tell me what this species
is again? It seems I wasn't smart enough to tag the plant or save the
message.

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From: "Wilbert Hetterscheid" hetter at worldonline.nl> on 2003.07.30 at 20:25:22(10446)
That could be Am. muelleri but there are also striped forms of bulbifer.

Wilbert

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From: "Julius Boos" ju-bo at msn.com> on 2003.07.30 at 22:57:42(10447)
Dear Lord P,

Does not A. muelleri also produce a pleasant smelling, beautifully colored peach/orange bloom? It used to be referred to around here as the 'good-smelling A. bulbifer'.

Julius

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From: "Wilbert Hetterscheid" hetter at worldonline.nl> on 2003.07.31 at 05:52:11(10449)
The bloom is not unlike that of bulbifer, even to the point of having a
pinkish interior (and sometimes exterior, see the IAS website!!!) but a more
distinct constriction between base and limb. The smell is as horrid as
bulbifer and those who think it is "good smelling" probably originate from
Uranus................(no pun intended..........I think....).

Lord P

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From: Harry Witmore harrywitmore at witmore.net> on 2003.07.31 at 14:54:12(10456)
---
Outgoing mail is certified Virus Free.
Checked by AVG anti-virus system (http://www.grisoft.com).
Version: 6.0.501 / Virus Database: 299 - Release Date: 7/14/2003

From: Harry Witmore harrywitmore at witmore.net> on 2003.07.31 at 14:54:55(10457)
When I had a bulbifer bloom this year the smell was very variable depending
on the time of day. Some times it smelled pretty bad and other times it had
sort of a sweet smell. It was sort of strange.

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From: "Julius Boos" ju-bo at msn.com> on 2003.07.31 at 17:31:43(10459)
Dear Lord P.,

I must then ask this question----is there perhaps a var. or clone of A. bulbifer that produces a pleasant smelling bloom??? I know that Charile, here in WPB, used to or still grows plants that look to all intents and purposes like A. bulbifer, but produce a VERY beautiful flask-like bloom, peach/orange colored, and it emits a GOOD smell! He had one in bloom for sale at a plant show at our local Bot. Garden about two or three years ago. I shall discuss this matter w/ Charlie, and perhaps try to obtain a plant!

Cheers,

Julius

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From: "brian williams" pugturd50 at hotmail.com> on 2003.07.31 at 19:19:54(10460)
Dear Julius

Glad to see you keeping the aroid-L active. About two years ago I ordered
Bulbifers from India. When I got them and started to grow them they all
seemed to have different stem patterns. The ones I have seen in florida and
everywhere else seemed to be the same as a few from India were this form.
But the others I have and have bloomed have very different stems from black
with bronze spots to very light green spots. I had one bloom just recently
and it did not exactly stink. It smelled a bit like a old banana or old
fruit. Kinda pleasent for a amorpho.

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From: "Wilbert Hetterscheid" hetter at worldonline.nl> on 2003.08.01 at 01:02:24(10462)
>
> I must then ask this question----is there perhaps a var. or
> clone of A. bulbifer that produces a pleasant smelling
> bloom??? I know that Charile, here in WPB, used to or still
> grows plants that look to all intents and purposes like A.
> bulbifer, but produce a VERY beautiful flask-like bloom,
> peach/orange colored, and it emits a GOOD smell! He had one
> in bloom for sale at a plant show at our local Bot. Garden
> about two or three years ago. I shall discuss this matter
> w/ Charlie, and perhaps try to obtain a plant!

I have to admit to not being confronted with too many clones of A. bulbifer
and it would be imaginable that there are "good" smelling ones. The chemical
composition of the plants we tested consists almost entirely of
dimethyltrisulphide (96%), 2% dimethyldisulphide and 1%
dimethyltetrasulphide. Now my experience is that species in which the
content of dimethyltetrasulphide is higher, a certain "sweetness" develops
but it is a very delicate balance with nauseaous. I also found that bad
smelling plants change their odour sometimes when the bloom ages and usually
also ends up "sweetish". My guess is that the amount of the tetrasulphide
relative to the other two sulphides determines this sweetness. There is
absolute variation in the tetrasulphide amount in certain species, so indeed
you may have clones in bulbifer with more sweetness. Having said all that, I
don't like the tetrasulphide sweetness at all. It is too close to nausea.

Well, I hope you learned you sulphides lesson here!!

Lord Phallulphides

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From: "Wilbert Hetterscheid" hetter at worldonline.nl> on 2003.08.01 at 01:04:56(10463)
Brian,

Do you have scans of the variation of patterns of stems and blooms in your
bulbifers? If so, can you email me a few privately at hetter@worldonline.nl
?

Thanks,
Wilbert

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From: "Peter C Boyce" levieux.jardin at wanadoo.fr> on 2003.08.01 at 03:52:44(10465)
Lord Phallulphides

I'm afraid I lost the will to live around about the fifth line...

I apologize.

Peter

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From: "Wilbert Hetterscheid" hetter at worldonline.nl> on 2003.08.01 at 04:41:43(10466)
Oh Boy(ce),

And there I was thinking one is never too old to live..........

P, Lord

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From: Al Wootten awootten at nrao.edu> on 2003.08.01 at 07:12:59(10467)
Hmmmm dimethyl disulfide CH 3 SSCH 3 only has ten atoms which would make it a
candidate for detection in interstellar space, a safe distance for sensitive
nostrils. CH 3 SH Methyl mercaptan has been known for years there. I'll have
to check on the spectrum when our local microwave spectrum guru Barry Turner
returns--looks pretty symmetric bad for rotational transitions) but big
enough for some floppiness.

Couldn't find an online sprectral treatment but...
In Ontario at least, growing too many blooming amorphophalli
may be illegal (though I don't know how many might produce 40 micrograms
of dimethyl disulfide...):

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From: "Ron" <ronlene at bellsouth.net> on 2007.01.27 at 07:28:41(15175)
I have a large collection of Dormant
Amorphophallus tubers. Should most of them be kept “bone dry” until
they show signs of new growth? When the new growth begins, before roots
appear, should they still be kept bone dry? Or, should the soil always be
kept misted? I know there are exceptions and someday I will know which
they are, but until that happens, I could use some general information.
Thanks for your help! Ron Florida

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