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  looking for Raphidophora celatocaulis
From: Jack Honeycutt jhoneycutt at uswest.net> on 2000.06.09 at 20:31:35(4699)
While traveling in Miami Florida about 6 months ago, I visited Fairchild
Tropical Gardens. In the greenhouse was a lovely tropical vine. The
leaves did not swing in the wind, but were almost glued flat to the surface
that they were climbing. It looked like something from a Science Fiction
move; like a plant from another planet....

The tag at Fairchild ID'ed this as Raphidophora sp. The plant came from a
botanical garden in New Guinea. The common name is 'The Shingle Plant'.

Calling around, I found a fellow at rareplants.com (The Glasshouse Works)
who suspected that this was R. celatocaulis. He had a Raphidophora, but
not the one I am looking for.

I would be interested in reading more about this genera, and would
appreciate any referrals to any books or articles (I just found and joined
the Aroid Society yesterday).
I would also be interested in being referred to anyone (or a nursery) who
might have a cutting of this plant for sale or trade.

I am new to this list and I look forward to learning more about this group
of plants.

+More
From: GeoffAroid at aol.com on 2000.06.10 at 10:09:08(4706)
Jack,

Was this shingle plant beautifully marked with reticulate white veins? I have
what I assume is a Raphidophora (courtesy of Hans Hvissers in the
Netherlands) with the loveliest leaves of almost any aroid I know. As you
say, it looks like it is glued to the host. I also have another, plainer
species or variant with dark olive leaves and a single slightly paler central
vein. I will post pics later today and let people know. Perhaps they can give
opinions.

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From: "Julius Boos" ju-bo at email.msn.com> on 2000.06.10 at 10:16:56(4710)
Dear Jack,

Many 'vining' Aroids do this, Philodendron, Monstera and Raphidophora come
to mind, it is a response to the growing conditions, and is a 'juvinile'
form of the plant which does and will change to one with 'normal' leaves
once it encounters different/'better' conditions higher up the tree, rock
face, or in the case of Fairchild Gardens, the wall!
Good luck in your quest!

Cheers and good growing,

Julius

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From: Jack Honeycutt jhoneycutt at uswest.net> on 2000.06.10 at 17:07:50(4712)
At 12:10 PM 6/10/2000 -0500, you wrote:

>Was this shingle plant beautifully marked with reticulate white veins? I have
>what I assume is a Raphidophora (courtesy of Hans Hvissers in the
>Netherlands) with the loveliest leaves of almost any aroid I know.

I am looking at some snap shots now and yes, it has white veins. My
scanner is off line (I need to free up a ISA slot), but I hope to get it
working next weekend. I will also try to post some pictures (I have 3).

>I will post pics later today and let people know. Perhaps they can give
>opinions.

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From: Jack Honeycutt jhoneycutt at uswest.net> on 2000.06.10 at 17:10:28(4713)
At 12:18 PM 6/10/2000 -0500, you wrote:

>Many 'vining' Aroids do this, Philodendron, Monstera and Raphidophora come
>to mind, it is a response to the growing conditions, and is a 'juvinile'
>form of the plant which does and will change to one with 'normal' leaves
>once it encounters different/'better' conditions higher up the tree, rock
>face, or in the case of Fairchild Gardens, the wall!

Ah! Good to know. Thanks for the good info.

jack in Portland Oregon

From: GeoffAroid at aol.com on 2000.06.10 at 17:15:24(4716)
Regarding my message concerning possible Rhaphidophora 'shingle plants' I
have now put my website online and you can see pics of my two possible
Rhaphidophoras which I would dearly love to know the names of (as would the
Free University Botanic Gardens in Amsterdam). Just follow the link to Aroids
and scroll down. The site uses layers so if your web software doesnt see the
thumbnails dont worry, you can still click on them and view the larger pics.
There are still a few bugs to sort out so be gentle.... the address is:
http://members.aol.com/Geoffaroid/GeoffsWeb.html.

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From: GeoffAroid at aol.com on 2000.06.10 at 17:30:14(4717)
In a message dated 11/6/00 1:08:10 am, jhoneycutt@uswest.net writes:

<< I am looking at some snap shots now and yes, it has white veins. My
scanner is off line (I need to free up a ISA slot), but I hope to get it

+More
From: Jack Honeycutt jhoneycutt at uswest.net> on 2000.06.10 at 21:17:42(4719)
At 07:16 PM 6/10/2000 -0500, you wrote:

Regarding my message concerning possible Raphidophora 'shingle plants' I
>have now put my website online and you can see pics of my two possible
>Rhaphidophoras which I would dearly love to know the names of (as would the
>Free University Botanic Gardens in Amsterdam).

+More
From: Jack Honeycutt jhoneycutt at uswest.net> on 2000.06.10 at 21:20:34(4720)
At 07:31 PM 6/10/2000 -0500, you wrote:

>Will happily send you a cutting of mine if it does turn out to be what you
>are looking for.

Thanks so much! I will take you up on that offer if we can key it out. So

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From: "Peter Boyce" Boyce at pothos.demon.co.uk> on 2000.06.11 at 09:13:10(4725)
Hi Geoff

Your white variegated 'Rhaphidophora' is Monstera dubia. This will
eventually produce very large, deeply divided leaves. This is the same plant
that we have at Kew (unlabelled!!)

The green-leaved plant is Rhaphidophora hayi, a newly recognized species due
to be published in August in the Garden's Bulletin Singapore. This is a
remarkable plant that retains its juvenile architecture into adulthood
('neoteny'). It is native to Australia (Queensland), Papua New Guinea (both
the mainland and the islands of Woodlark and New Ireland, and Papua Bharat
(Irian Jaya). It is related to R. pachyphylla (New Guinea) and R. parvifolia
(Maluku).

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From: "Peter Boyce" Boyce at pothos.demon.co.uk> on 2000.06.11 at 09:16:03(4726)
Dear All

Rhaphidophora celatocaulis is a synonym of Rhaphidophora korthalsii,
published for the juvenile shingeling stage of this widespread asian
climber.

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