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  Propagation Amorphophallus titanum
From: "Bjoern Malkmus" bjoern.malkmus at verwaltung.uni-mainz.de> on 2000.07.06 at 16:19:56(4988)
Hello all,

> BTW, There is another Amorphophallus titanum preparing to flower at Bonn
> Botanical Garden. This immense inflorescence may almost reach the
> proportions of the record setting flower at New York Botanical Garden in
> 1937. NYBG had the largest documented inflorescence in cultivation. Bonn
> is predicting their plant will flower around July 10. Check their web
> site for daily updates

Donna thanks for the info about the event 'just around the corner', I
will be there next week-end...

> Don't think its a good idea to "divide" the A. titanum tubers although
> there are rare times when the tubers may offset in cultivation. The only
> way to reliably propagate this plant is via seed.

I made some good experiences in forcing tubers of Am. titanum to
divide by making an 1cm/0.35" deep cross-cut with a sharp knife
through the vegetative point of 10cm/3.7" ? dormant tubers. During
the next growing cycle tubers will either develop no leaf, a deformed
one or several smaller leaves, more or less deformed. Out of three
tubers, two managed to split up into several smaller ones (3 and 5).
All orginal tubers (fortunately) survived this method and created a
new vegetative point, but apparently did not enlarge in size. Growing
cycle of those 'mistreated' plants was significantly longer (9 months
instead of usually 7). New tubers (still more or less adventive to the
main one) were separated after that and are now grown on as

From: SelbyHort at aol.com on 2000.07.06 at 19:39:52(4996)
I just discovered the mistake I made about the NYBG having the world's
largest recorded Amorphophallus titanum inflorescence in cultivation. This
record is actually held by from Wageningen (Netherlands) flowering of 1932
(2.67 m). Kebun Raya Bogor (Indonesia) had a flowering in 1924 that reached
2.61 m. The New York Botanical Garden flowering of 1937 actually was 8 feet 5
inches (101 inches) or 2.56 m. This means the recent Bonn flowering of 2.57
meters is the third largest ever recorded in cultivation. Must be a splendid
thing to see!

If you go to the IAS web site and check out the web links, clicking the Bonn
link for their 1996 flowering you will find information and images of their
newest event.

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