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  hardiness of Sauromatum
From: Diana Reeck dianar at teleport.com> on 2000.07.29 at 09:00:50(5166)
I am looking for information about the hardiness of Sauromatum venosum. I
am writing up my fall plant list, and would like some to get anyone's
personal experiences with this. Thanks

Diana

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From: Steve Marak samarak at arachne.uark.edu> on 2000.07.29 at 09:34:41(5174)
On Sat, 29 Jul 2000, Diana Reeck wrote:

> I am looking for information about the hardiness of Sauromatum venosum. I
> am writing up my fall plant list, and would like some to get anyone's
> personal experiences with this. Thanks

Diana,

I and a number of others grow it easily in USDA zone 6 (NW Arkansas, in my
case), and it's survived overnight lows of -20 F (-28 C) with no problem.
Even the smallest offsets have no trouble with the cold. I think I
remember Panayoti Kelaidis in Denver telling me that it was hardy there
(yes, "hardy in Denver" again), and I recall that some I sent Ellen Hornig
years ago survived at least their first winter in upstate New York.

Since Wilbert insists on sinking this into Typhonium, and Typhonium has
also been a popular topic lately, this gives me a perfect segue to
hardiness in Typhoniums in general. Besides venosum and giganteum - which
produces marvelously tropical-looking leaves when happy outdoors - what
are the coldest growing and hardiest members of the genus?

Steve

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From: "James W. Waddick" jim-jim at swbell.net> on 2000.07.30 at 08:31:14(5178)
>I am looking for information about the hardiness of Sauromatum venosum. I
>am writing up my fall plant list, and would like some to get anyone's
>personal experiences with this. Thanks
>
>Diana

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From: Dean Sliger deanslgr at juno.com> on 2000.07.30 at 08:31:28(5179)
Perfectly hardy here.

Dean Sliger

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From: Douglas Ewing dewing at u.washington.edu> on 2000.07.30 at 08:31:41(5180)
Here is my $o2. on Sauromatum: It is perfectly hardy where I live north
of Seattle (USDA Zone 7). More to the point, it is a weed. I planted
tubers in my garden a dozen years ago for a researcher who studies
thermogenic plants. We were successful in getting a crop, although we
decided to stick to producing the research material in containers, as was
done previously. Ever since, I have been battling this plant in my
garden. It is extremely difficult to get rid of. I would classify it with
Arum maculatum, as potentially invasive, noxious weeds. Doug

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From: "George R Stilwell, Jr." grsjr at juno.com> on 2000.07.30 at 08:32:41(5182)
Diana,

It's like a weed in zone 7a. I believe there are people growing it in
zone 5 as well.

Ray

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From: Tom and Ann Kline TomAnnKline at worldnet.att.net> on 2000.07.30 at 08:32:54(5183)
Dear Diana, i have had both Souromatum venosum and Amorphophallus rivieri jin
may garden for oaver ten years, including the infamomous January 1994 when we
had -10 F.
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From: Don Martinson llmen at execpc.com> on 2000.07.30 at 08:33:09(5184)
>I am looking for information about the hardiness of Sauromatum venosum. I
>am writing up my fall plant list, and would like some to get anyone's
>personal experiences with this. Thanks
>
>Diana
>COLLECTOR'S NURSERY
>16804 NE 102nd Ave
>Battle Ground, WA 98604
>Bill Janssen/Diana Reeck

Some of mine made it through the winter here in Milwaukee (5b), but
then last winter, we barely got below 0F.
--
Don Martinson

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From: Ellen Hornig hornig at Oswego.EDU> on 2000.07.30 at 08:33:23(5185)
Since Steve Marak mentioned sending me sauromatums (typhoniums) years ago,
I thought I'd better check in with my own report.

The tubers you sent me, Steve, eventually expired in the garden, where I
had planted them in what was probably a much too heavy soil. As best I
remember, I had more in pots; and concluding that they would not be hardy,
I dumped whatever remained into the compost heap. That compost heap was
eventually spread across an area that became a new garden, and last year I
started noticing small sauromatums there. This year there are at least
three good-sized ones (one bloomed) and several little ones.

We are somewhat colder here in upstate NY than Steve is in Arkansas
(though technically only a half-zone colder, we can have long spells where
highs linger in the teens (Fahrenheit) and lows are down to -10F or so,
but these are usually at times when we have good snow cover). In general,
zone 6 herbaceous plants are pretty safe here; for woodies, it's
definitely zone 5.

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From: "Plantsman" plantsman at prodigy.net> on 2000.07.30 at 08:33:39(5186)
>From my own personal experience with this aroid going back over
twenty years, I can say that it is quite hardy in USDA Zone 6a
(NE Tennessee), if planted so that the corm is covered with soil
at least 3"-4" deep. I have them in large foundation plantings
as well as an exposed raised bed and find them equally hardy as
long as the corm itself is planted deep enough that it doesn't
become frozen through. The raised bed plants come up around 3
weeks earlier in the Spring than the foundation plantings. This
I assume is due to the soil temperatures increasing faster in the
raised bed. Right now they are beautiful!

David A. Sizemore

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From: DeniBown at aol.com on 2000.07.31 at 21:29:23(5191)
My personal experience may not be relevant, as I live in the UK, but I have
found it much hardier than gardening manuals say. For instance, the Royal
Horticultural Society's A-Z Encyclopedia of Garden plants gives "minimum 5
degrees C (41 degrees F), while my plants stand several degrees of frost.
First I planted surplus tubers at the base of a wall that stays warmer and
drier than the border. When they survived and multiplied I then tried them
in the open ground and last winter (which was pretty mild though of course
with some brief frosty spells - and loads of rain) they came through again,
no problem. I live in Norfolk, which is not a particularly warm area of
Britain. Also we don't have hot summers, but they grow very nicely just the
same. Plants currently have leaves 60cm (2ft) across, with leaflets 30cm
(12in) long, on stems 60cm (2ft) tall. From a single tuber, most plants now
have four or five other leaves in addition to the main one that develops
after the inflorescence withers. They have infructescences developing at
ground level too.

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From: ron mchatton rmchatton at photocircuits.com> on 2000.07.31 at 21:30:19(5193)
Diana:
I am originally from the North Coast of California a couple of hundred
miles north of the San Francisco Area. While winters are mild (350 days
without frost), they are very wet and chilly. Sauromatum venosum survives
the winter there without any obvious problems with rotting of the dormant
tubers.
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From: "Wilbert Hetterscheid" hetter at worldonline.nl> on 2000.07.31 at 21:31:01(5196)
Steve,

Hardiness of tropical plants is not a very popular item among Euopean plant
lovers......... ESPECIALLY not testing it!! Typhonium venosum and giganteum
are indeed the toughest ones. My guess is that the Chinese high-altitude
clones of T. horsfieldii may also prove to be more temperate than others but
all other species I grow seem to thrive too well in a greenhouse to believe
they wanna be elsewhere.

Cheers,
Wilbert

From: Diana Reeck dianar at teleport.com> on 2000.07.31 at 21:31:15(5197)
Thanks to everyone who answered this one for me - much appreciated

Diana

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From: "Peter Boyce" Boyce at pothos.demon.co.uk> on 2000.08.02 at 08:25:37(5203)
Further to Deni's comments, I can add a few. My T. venosum are in a 15 litre
pot in an unheated greenhouse and are rested as dry tubers sitting on open
mesh staging in the same greenhouse (absolute minimum last year minus 10,
average minimum 1). The plants this year have three to four leaves per
tuber, largest leaf 1.2 m. tall with a blade spread of 53 cm. Inflorescence
on this largest plant was 46 cm tall.

Pete

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From: MAIL13A/SHU%SHU at shu.edu on 2000.08.02 at 08:27:25(5204)
>>>>>>>>>>>>>>Thanks to everyone who answered this one for me - much
appreciated

Diana>>>>>>>>>>>>>

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