IAS Aroid Quasi Forum

About Aroid-L
 This is a continuously updated archive of the Aroid-L mailing list in a forum format - not an actual Forum. If you want to post, you will still need to register for the Aroid-L mailing list and send your postings by e-mail for moderation in the normal way.

  mainstream
From: MJ Hatfield <oneota at ames.net> on 1997.01.02 at 19:16:05(38)
Ahh, aroids are becoming more mainstream.
The Parks Countryside Gardens has:
Amorphophallus bulbifera, which looks like A.konjac, but then I
haven't seed an A.bulbifer bloom yet
And Wayside Gardens, A Gardener's Treasury, has:
Arisaema candidissimum for only $39.95
Arum italicum 'Pictum' for only $14.95
MJ Hatfield

From: crat at cris.com on 1997.01.02 at 19:49:37(42)
MJ Hatfield wrote:
>
> Ahh, aroids are becoming more mainstream.
> The Parks Countryside Gardens has:
> Amorphophallus bulbifera, which looks like A.konjac, but then I
> haven't seed an A.bulbifer bloom yet
> And Wayside Gardens, A Gardener's Treasury, has:
> Arisaema candidissimum for only $39.95
> Arum italicum 'Pictum' for only $14.95
>
Mellinger's 1977 Garden catalog just arrived this week with listings for
Sauromatum guttatum, Amorphophallus bulbifer, Sarracenia purpurea,
several callas (no species listed), Asarum candense, and Arisaema
triphyllum. (There were also a number of gingers for those who follow
that sort of thing .) None were at the outrageous prices of Wayside,
e.g. A. triphyllum and A. candense were $5.75 each and the S. gutattum
was $3.50.

+More
From: Steve Marak <samarak at arachne.uark.edu> on 1997.01.02 at 20:09:19(44)
I also noticed that the Park's Countryside Gardens catalog list
"Amorphophallus bulbifera", which is a new name for them; previously they
only listed it as "Amorphophallus - rare". The picture still looks like
konjac to me, too, and indeed that's the origin of my first konjacs so I
suspect we all know what they are.

Arisaemas in general do seem to be becoming mainstream, don't they? This
is good for us, though - less than 10 years ago I never saw any offered
except occasionally A. sikokianum or perhaps A. triphyllum as a native
woodland wildflower. Now we have a considerable variety from a number of
good sources.

Steve

+More
From: Timothy Chapman <chapman at premier.net> on 1997.01.03 at 11:03:47(47)
Maybe this thread should be "The Dark Side of the Nursery business" The
picture shown in the Park's catalog is of a bloom of A. konjac (they
used to sell it as rivierii I think). The plant shown doesn't look like
A. bulbifer either. Many catalogs buy slides from people (different
from the plant source). so what you see is often not what you get.
Several things could have happened. They actually are selling A.
bulbifer, but just used the slides of konjac instead. Or they are
selling konjac but mislabeled as bulbifer or .. who knows what they
have.

Someone else mentioned gingers (my specialty). While many of these
(from Wayside) are coming from a legitimate grower in gainseville,
several of the ones listed in the supplemental catalog are not
propagated. Many new gingers are being wild collected (by the
thousands) from Thailand, Burma, and Cambodia and sold through various
nurseries (some never seeing any US soil or even pots!). I'm not sure
if Wayside realizes this or not, but I can be certain that some of these
are not being propagated at all. Some of these are being tissue
cultured now, but unfortunately the wild plants are cheaper than TC
plugs, not to mention the TCed ones aren't widely available yet.

The most common wild collected ones are :Curcuma gracillima ("Candy
Cane" "Burnt Burgandy", Curcuma thorelii "Chiang Mai Snow", Curcuma
cordata, Globba winitii "White Dragon" and many more species on the
way. Most C. alismatifolia ARE NOT wild collected, the most common form
has been clonally propagated for many years, as are two new color forms
(white and maroon)

If you are interested in these, you should wait until this material is
propagated. Some are already producing very select clones, that are
either TCed or propagated by divisions. keep in mind that the wild
material is very variable. some good, some terrible, many diseased.

Tim Chapman

+More
From: BIHOREL at cris.com (Christian Feuillet) on 1997.01.03 at 11:10:29(49)
>Ahh, aroids are becoming more mainstream.
>The Parks Countryside Gardens has:
> Amorphophallus bulbifera, which looks like A.konjac, but then I
>haven't seed an A.bulbifer bloom yet
>And Wayside Gardens, A Gardener's Treasury, has:
> Arisaema candidissimum for only $39.95
> Arum italicum 'Pictum' for only $14.95
>MJ Hatfield

+More
From: Jean Halverson <jahalve at mhtc.net> on 1997.01.03 at 19:08:57(54)
Alplains has seed from A. japonicum, takedae and yamatense v sugimotoi
for sale--8-10 seeds for $4.00. I bought seed from last year and I
think all germinated. Catalog is $2.00, address is Po Box 489, Kiowa CO
80117-0489.

Note: this is a very old post, so no reply function is available.