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  Typhonium violifolium scented or unscented
From: Paul Tyerman tyerman at dynamite.com.au> on 2000.08.02 at 20:10:35(5214)
Just a quick comment.....

I don't know how many of you are familiar with an australian native shrub
called "Brown Boronia" (Boronioa megastigma?). It has the most amazing
perfume that wafts throughout nurseries when they stock them, or throughout
your garden when in flower. I can smell this perfume when I step into the
nursery and know thaty they are currently in stock.

However..... many people cannot smell the perfume. People seem either to
be able to or not able to. There is just something about the perfume.
Nurserymen warn customers that they may or may not be able to smell it, it
is that common for people not to be able to.

Perhaps some of these aroids that people claim are unscented or sweetly
scented have a scent similar to this? I find the perfume of the brown
boronia absolutely heavenly and as I said can smell it from a long way
away, but others cannot at all.

Just a thought.

Thanks Peoples.

Cheers.

Paul Tyerman

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From: Don Martinson llmen at execpc.com> on 2000.08.03 at 07:26:23(5215)
>Just a quick comment.....
>
>However..... many people cannot smell the perfume. People seem either to
>be able to or not able to. There is just something about the perfume.
>Nurserymen warn customers that they may or may not be able to smell it, it
>is that common for people not to be able to.

The subject of tasters vs. non-tasters (or in this case, smellers vs.
non-smellers) is well documented in biology. For years, we have
known that for a very bitter substance, PTU (propyl thiouracil),
there are those who can and who cannot taste the bitterness. As part
of my independent studies program as an undergraduate, I found that
this ability (as far as PTU was concerned) was inherited as a
dominant gene in rats. It would be interesting to note if the same
held true for other "sensors vs non-sensors".
Paul, are your spouse and children (if applicable) able to smell Boronia?

--
Don Martinson

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From: Betsytrips at aol.com on 2000.08.03 at 11:58:15(5221)
Good point. Very interesting observation and could well be true of other
plants. We tend to think we all can smell odors when maybe sometimes that
fact is not a universal attribute.
Betsy

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