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  Arisarum proboscideum
From: "Carlo A. Balistrieri" <cabalist at facstaff.wisc.edu> on 1997.03.05 at 06:56:42(456)
Is anyone out there growing Arisarum proboscideum? I picked some up last
year and am not sure it is still with me (although it was wintered under
cover). I haven't rooted around in the pot for it but it doesn't look too
promising. In fairness to whatever skill I might have as a grower the tubers
were pretty small (more like little rhizome cuttings--I know, excuses,
excuses!) I'm interested in the experience any others have had with it. Tell
me how to do it right.

Carlo

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From: Nick Turland <N.Turland at nhm.ac.uk> on 1997.03.05 at 11:14:43(458)
>Is anyone out there growing Arisarum proboscideum?

I have a clump growing in a pot here in London, and it came up (leaves, so
far) about three weeks ago, after the sub-zero weather finished.

Nick.

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From: "Jack Lambert (RJL6)" <rjl6 at cornell.edu> on 1997.03.05 at 20:29:36(462)
>>>>>Is anyone out there growing Arisarum proboscideum?<<<<<<<

You don't cite your zone, Carlos, but the Arisarum doesn't emerge here
(Ithaca, N.Y. Zone IV B) until May. As Nick notes, it keeps its head down
until after the frost. It has been in the yard for at least 20 years and
the worst damage that has been inflicted on it has been the result of my
poking around in it, tweeking out the Anemone nemorosa which impinge. No,
don't poke around in those pots. It is easy to damage the growth tips.
Just keep the faith up and the hands off.

Nina Lambert

From: "Mr R.a McClure" <Rob.McClure at sci.monash.edu.au> on 1997.03.06 at 06:59:50(465)
> Date: Wed, 05 Mar 1997 09:53:28 -0600
> From: "Carlo A. Balistrieri"
> Subject: Re: Arisarum proboscideum
> To: rob.mcclure@sci.monash.edu.au
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From: "Carlo A. Balistrieri" <cabalist at facstaff.wisc.edu> on 1997.03.06 at 10:07:18(468)
Thanks Nina et al,

My plants were wintered indoors and thus zone is not a major concern
(although I'm thrilled to hear that you are successful with A. proboscideum
in 4B; it should do just fine here then (4B-5A). This is the coldest I've
heard it will take; most catalogues suggest 6-7!). I just expected that
indoors, I'd have seen something by now. I'll wait it out as you suggest.

Carlo

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From: IntarsiaCo at aol.com on 1997.08.09 at 08:03:21(1028)
Several years ago,from a seedling sale, I received a small plant of this that
has yet to bloom for me. This year it has put on much new growth (I fed it)
and has formed "bulbils" at the axis where the leaves join the stem. Does
this sound like the above named plant and how do I handle the "bulbils"? I
would like to pot some up for next weeks seedling sale. Any help would be
much appreciated.
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From: Don Burns <burns at mobot.org> on 1997.08.09 at 13:54:55(1029)
> Several years ago,from a seedling sale, I received a small plant of this that
> has yet to bloom for me. This year it has put on much new growth (I fed it)
> and has formed "bulbils" at the axis where the leaves join the stem. Does
> this sound like the above named plant and how do I handle the "bulbils"? I
> would like to pot some up for next weeks seedling sale. Any help would be
> much appreciated.
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From: Greg Ruckert <greg at ezi-learn.com.au> on 1997.08.09 at 17:16:37(1031)
At 10:04 AM 8/9/97 -0500, you wrote:
>Several years ago,from a seedling sale, I received a small plant of this that
>has yet to bloom for me. This year it has put on much new growth (I fed it)
>and has formed "bulbils" at the axis where the leaves join the stem. Does
>this sound like the above named plant and how do I handle the "bulbils"? I
>would like to pot some up for next weeks seedling sale. Any help would be
>much appreciated.
> Mark Mazer Gaylordsville CT Zone 5

Hi all,

Certainly not an expert but as this is one of my favourite non-Arisaema
thought I would have a go. Could we have a more complete description of the
leaves please.
I have grown and flowered this species for a number of years (must get some
pics on the web page). I would strongly agree with Don that this is not a
bulbil-forming species. Mine are all stoloniferous and have just leafed up
(so am surprised that anyone in the northern hemisphere would have it in
leaf now). I find that it flowers well if given enough water. The leaves
should be a plain dark greem colour.
Could I go further and suggest that this is more likely to be a Pinellia
cordata (wild guess without a good description of the suspect). As for the
seedling sale - don't do it. There is nothing more frustrating than buying
incorrectly named plants. My ultimate preference is not to distribute
material unless I can confirm its name. See if you can get hold of a back
issue of "The Kew Magazine" which had a lovely (the best I have seen) write
up on the genus. I can't remember which issue it was in. {Rob McClure
might be kind enough to look it up and post it for me}

Now that we are on the matter of Arisarums..... As well as Arisarum
proboscideum I have the mottled leaf Arisarum vulgare. I also have a plain
green leaved version of Arisarum vulgare which I have not seen written up.
I desperately want to get hold of Arisarum simmorrhinum. Can anyone help??
I know that it is available in the UK from Monocot Nursery.
Do any members of Aroid-L grow this?

Kind regards,
Greg Ruckert

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From: grsjr at juno.com (George R Stilwell, Jr.) on 1997.08.09 at 22:31:59(1035)
Mark,

Did the inflorecense look like a mini Arisaema dracontium, or did it look
like a brownish mouse diving under the plant with his tail hanging out?

If the former, it's probably Pinellia, if the latter, the name you have
is probably correct.

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From: "James W. Waddick" <jim-jim at swbell.net> on 1997.08.10 at 08:10:51(1036)
Dear Mark - with apologies to Don and Greg;
Even though I currently am not growing Arisarum proboscideum, I
have on and off for years. Your plant does not sound much like the true
species and the suggestions that it may be a Pinellia especially in regard
to bulbils forming on the leaf/petiole interface.
Its vigor suggests P. ternata, which should not be brought to a
plant sale with a large sign saving Caveat Emptor!.

We all need more info to make a determination.

Best Jim W.

James W. Waddick Voice: 816 746 1949
8871 NW Brostrom Rd E-MAIL: jim-jim@swbell.net
Kansas City MO 64152 Fax: 816 746 1939
Zone 5/6 -

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From: IntarsiaCo at aol.com on 1997.08.10 at 12:23:58(1038)
Thank you all for your input. The plant in question has 15 or so petioles in
this 2" square pot ranging from 3" in height down to 1.25". The petioles are
all green. Most of the petiole are topped with three leaves, the largest
3.5" long by 1.625" wide. Some of the petioles are topped by a single leaf,
some by a single leaf that appears not to have completely seperated from the
two lower leaves. Many of the petioles have developed "bulbils" at the
axis where the leaves join the petiole. The bulbils develop a pointy shape,
from which a new leaf appears. Prior to the appearance of the new leaf, the
bulbil has a brownish band midwayup the roundish part, the elongated pointy
shape is streaked with fine reddish dashes or dots. I cut open the most
mature bulbil with a razor this A.M. and the bulbil is cream colored inside
and shows no resemblance to a flowering mechanism. I shall not offer this at
the seedling sale but will bring it with me, perhaps some "Guru" will be able
to ID this for me.
Thanks
Mark Mazer Gaylordsville CT. Zone 5

From: "James W. Waddick" <jim-jim at swbell.net> on 1997.08.10 at 14:31:29(1039)
> The plant in question has 15 or so petioles in
>this 2" square pot ranging from 3" in height down to 1.25". The petioles a=
re
>all green. Most of the petiole are topped with three leaves, the largest
>3.5" long by 1.625" wide. Some of the petioles are topped by a single leaf=
,
>some by a single leaf that appears not to have completely seperated from th=
e
>two lower leaves. Many of the petioles have developed "bulbils" at the
>axis where the leaves join the petiole. The bulbils develop a pointy shape=
,
>from which a new leaf appears.

I shall not offer this at
>the seedling sale but will bring it with me, perhaps some "Guru" will be ab=
le
>to ID this for me.

Dear Mark;
I place my bets on Pinellia ternata. Any takers?

Someone should have experience with this in CT or New England. Get
the ID confirmed before you label and donate any.

Best Jim W.

James W. Waddick Voice: 816 746 1949
8871 NW Brostrom Rd E-MAIL: jim-jim@swbell.net
Kansas City MO 64152 Fax: 816 746 1939
Zone 5/6 -

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From: TimothyA7 at aol.com on 1997.08.11 at 06:31:56(1040)
Hi All,
Arisema dracontium has bloomed and set seed here at the IAS seedling bank.
Is ther enough interest for us to plant this seed? This seed came to us from
a member in Italy. I suspect this is a temperate zone plant but has grow well
here in our subtropical climate.
Tim

From: grsjr at juno.com (George R Stilwell, Jr.) on 1997.08.16 at 20:25:10(1053)
Tim,

If you don't plant the seed, send it to the Arisaema Enthusiasts Group
care of:

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