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  a non-aroid question
From: Lester Kallus lkallus at earthlink.net> on 2000.11.09 at 20:35:14(5662)
OK, so this has absolutely nothing to do with anything even remotely
connected with aroids.

What happened to the acorns on Long Island this year? Last year the rattle

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From: "C. R. Waldron" cwaldron at frognet.net> on 2000.11.10 at 07:24:08(5665)
> What happened to the acorns on Long Island this year? > This year I
haven't seen a single

It's not an answer to your, question but Southern Ohio and West Virginia
have a bumper crop--many more than last year. A WV wildlife report says
there are so many acorns that the deer fill up in 30 minutes and lay down
the rest of the day. I guess that's good news for the deer, bad for
hunters.

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From: "George R Stilwell, Jr." grsjr at juno.com> on 2000.11.10 at 07:24:23(5666)
Les,

The current acorn supply is greatly diminished here in North Carolina
too. I have observed
that production is heavy one year and scarce the next - this over a
number of years.

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From: Al Wootten awootten at NRAO.EDU> on 2000.11.10 at 07:25:20(5668)
Lester

Boy we've got a bumper crop of acorns down here in Virginia. Can't walk
anywhere without a crunch crunch underfoot, nor sleep for the banging on the
roof. Second year in a row, and we have a bumper crop of squirrels along with
it (who keep diggin up my amorph corms, even in pots--they have a real
thing for A. konjac, which I have obtained two years in a row now and lost
two years in a row). I guess they like variety in their diets...but at least
once I've found a bulbifer corm off in the gutter, apparent victim of the furry
grey amophophallicides, so maybe they just redistribute them. Still no frost
here, latest date I recall.

Clear skies,
Al
Charlottesville, Va.

From: Jmh98law at aol.com on 2000.11.10 at 07:25:35(5669)
Les,

Here in Northern Michigan, the acorns started dropping in August. I asked one
of my neighbors, a retire forester, if it was because of the drought. He said
that in a dry year, the trees will drop many of them early (relatively
unformed) to use the energy for leaf retention / food production.

I've seen a few acorns here and there as I've been working out in the yard.
But this is not a typical year.

Jeanne Hannah

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