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  Remusatia vivipara
From: Don Burns <burns at mobot.org> on 1997.03.14 at 18:59:54(503)
R. vivipara started shooting up a petiole last week, and shortly
afterward, even before the leaf emerged, up popped an infloresence. It
apparently opened last night. Bown says this is normal behavior for this
species, although according to her many plants never produce
an infloresence. This afternoon the spathe had totally
withered already with spadix still in place and looking OK. This all
happened very quickly. Has anyone on the list experienced flowering and been
lucky enough to get seed?

Don

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From: "Mr R.a McClure" <Rob.McClure at sci.monash.edu.au> on 1997.03.16 at 21:03:50(507)
> Date: Fri, 14 Mar 1997 21:01:05 -0600
> From: Don Burns
> Subject: Remusatia vivipara
> To: rob.mcclure@sci.monash.edu.au
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From: Don Burns <burns at mobot.org> on 1998.03.01 at 13:12:13(1930)
R. vivipara has broken dormancy here and appears to be just as vigorous
as last year. One inflorescence has already opened and spathe withered,
and two more inflorescences appear to be in the works. Last year three
appeared also. We also had three leaves last year so hopefully the plant
will produce a repeat performance.

The plant was also particularly prolific in producing the aerial shoots
with the tiny bulblets. While the bulblets have for the most part been
blown about by the wind, the shoots are still alive. Some of the shoots
are vertical while others are circling the container just above the
medium but staying within the container's confines.

I cut off several of these shoots and this is when I noticed that they
are still green and moist inside. Does cutting these affect the plant
in any way? Has anyone tried rooting new plants from these shoots?

Don

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From: piaba piabinha at yahoo.com> on 2003.06.24 at 12:05:34(10350)
hey all,

last year i received a plant of R. vivipara, which
promptly went dormant (or was dormant when it
arrived). last week, it has resprouted, with several
new leaves. however, the old stems are still there
and i'm wondering if there's any function to them, or
i can remove them. these old stems are dry on the
outside, but when you cut them, they are still green
inside.

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From: "Hawaii Tropical Botanical Garden" htbg at ilhawaii.net> on 2003.06.24 at 16:51:40(10353)
Here is what Plant Delights Nursery has to say...

This bizarre genus of easy-to-grow aroids usually occurs in the wild as
epiphytes (growing without soil on trees or rocks). Despite this alternate
lifestyle, R. vivipara makes a superb garden plant in the soil as well. In
late spring, the very glossy green leaves emerge, forming a dwarf clump to
2-3' tall. Once the tuber is large enough, the new foliage will be
accompanied by the cool fragrant yellow flowers. In late summer, remusatias
show why they were banished into a separate genus with their bizarre stolons
that arise from the tuber and grow erect to 10" tall. Each stolon is laden
with tiny fuzzy hooked tubercles (bulbils in need of a shave), which can be
used to propagate more plants. In Third World countries, a rub derived from
the tubers is used to treat arthritic pain. If you like unusual plants, this
is a must!

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From: Harry Witmore harrywitmore at witmore.net> on 2003.06.25 at 15:03:52(10355)
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Version: 6.0.491 / Virus Database: 290 - Release Date: 6/18/2003

From: piaba piabinha at yahoo.com> on 2003.06.26 at 20:21:07(10357)
thanks, scott. actuall, the plant came from them
(tony avent/petra).

the old stems (which are dry on the outside but still

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From: piaba piabinha at yahoo.com> on 2003.09.11 at 07:30:58(10568)
hey all,

is this an epiphyte? does it require full sun? any
other cultural requirements?

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From: "Balistrieri, Carlo" cbalistrieri at nybg.org> on 2003.09.11 at 09:09:32(10569)
Tsuh Yang,

Although a tuberous aroid (with aerial shoots), Deni Bown's book Aroids,
indicates that they have been found growing in trees. Apparently the burred
bulbils catch on mammals and/or birds and are carried far and wide. I grew
it once upon a time and no longer have it. I would treat it like a tuberous
aroid, i.e. pot it up. Use a humusy soil, or epiphyte pot mix, and keep
moist but not soggy--you'll rot the tuber. I wouldn't give it full sun.
Bright shade is a kind of catch all category. Once you have the plant
producing it's bulbils, play with the epiphyte character.

Carlo

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From: Dan Levin levin at pixar.com> on 2003.09.11 at 09:17:37(10570)
tsuh yang,

I must report my Remusatia vivipara plants never read the books
reporting that in nature the plants have epiphytic tendencies.
No doubt they do, but as with so many plants, Rem. vivipara are
quite adaptable to varying cultural conditions. Certainly mine
don't climb out of the pots (or ground) as do Anthuria, e.g.

I'm currently growing 2 vivipara's: one in my GH, in a soil/ epiphyte
mix; and one simply plunked into the ground in poorly amended clay,
just outside the GH. Even if they could or do grow as epiphytes, the
amount of water needed to develop and support those huge leaves
is not trivial.

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From: piaba piabinha at yahoo.com> on 2003.10.27 at 10:24:58(10726)
hi all,

i have another question about this plant. does it
have a required rest period every year, or can it grow
year-round with no rest?

tsuh yang

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From: Tony Avent tony at plantdel.com> on 2003.10.27 at 11:23:33(10728)
Dear Tsuh:

Remusatia does seem to have a required rest period. Even when the
vegetative tubercles are planted in fall and kept at 65 degrees F, they
will not sprout until the following June.

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From: piaba piabinha at yahoo.com> on 2003.10.27 at 11:35:54(10731)
tony, thanks for the reply. as a matter of fact, it's
your plant that i have... it's getting a bit yellow
so i wasn't sure if it's suffering or just going
dormant naturally. it sprouted this spring or early
summer and it's been in growth since.

tsuh yang chen

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From: Krzysztof Kozminski kk at kozminski.com> on 2003.10.27 at 20:26:29(10735)
On Monday, October 27, 2003, at 11:23 AM, Tony Avent wrote:

Dear Tsuh:

Remusatia does seem to have a required rest period. Even when the
vegetative tubercles are planted in fall and kept at 65 degrees F, they
will not sprout until the following June.

I beg to differ. I had them planted in December, kept at 75-80 F, and
by June they grew into quite significant plants. Chilling them down to
65 F might have arrested any development.

Tubers, on the other hand, go dormant.

KK

From: Tony Avent tony at plantdel.com> on 2003.10.28 at 05:18:42(10739)
Krzysztof:

Very interesting on the temp. required to keep Remusatia vivipara growing
75 degrees F vs. 65 degrees F. Is this also true of the plant at those
temps, or does it go dormant for you anyway?

Tony Avent

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From: Krzysztof Kozminski kk at kozminski.com> on 2003.10.28 at 20:28:03(10750)
On Tuesday, October 28, 2003, at 05:18 AM, Tony Avent wrote:

Krzysztof:

Very interesting on the temp. required to keep Remusatia vivipara

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From: piaba piabinha at yahoo.com> on 2003.10.29 at 07:38:38(10754)
krzysztof,

when do your adult plants go dormant? winter?

tsuh yang

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From: Harry Witmore <harrywitmore at witmore.net> on 2004.02.08 at 11:53:06(11114)
My Remusatia vivipara is in bloom. It's been dormant in a 65 degree
greenhouse and has decided to bloom this year. First time.

http://www.cloudjungle.dns2go.com/Epiphytes/PlantsByCat.asp?xml=epiphytes.xml&xsl=search.xsl&Family=Araceae&Genus=Remusatia

Harry Witmore

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