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  more on the shakey amorph
From: Carol Ann Bonner cadastra at mindspring.com> on 2001.05.22 at 20:37:26(6537)
Per Wilbert's instructions, I repotted my amorphophallus that was loose in
its pot -- but not before I left town for the weekend. When I returned,
the poor thing had fallen over again and been trampled by dogs (my own, I'm
afraid.) So my repotted plant is a bit bedraggled.

My question is, what happens to an amorph when its solitary leaf gets
smooshed? Will it form another growing point, limp through the season with
ratty foliage, or (God forbid) *die*?

Meanwhile, my A. konjac that had seemed slow resurrecting is putting out
such a new growth that I'm afraid its next step will be world domination.

Carol Ann

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From: mburack at mindspring.com on 2001.05.23 at 08:15:00(6542)
Dear Carol,

Unfortunately I have had my share of experience with this. As a matter of fact, last night a wonderful Florida rainstorm came through with some peaceful, calm 40+ mile an hour winds.

10+ plants were sheared into the oblivion... this happens to me with some frequency. Usually for me (if there is a tuber left) it will stay down until the next year (and of course usually rot or dessicate before it gets to that point), or generally just die completely.

I think only once or twice have I seen a new leaf come up (my experience in these situations), and it happened only when the tuber was quite large.

I swear I dont understand how these things ever made it through the evolutionary process..... what plant makes one leaf per year? Dont animals or storms destroy these things in the wild like they do in cultivation???!!!!!???

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From: "Wilbert Hetterscheid" hetter at worldonline.nl> on 2001.05.23 at 09:49:12(6546)
When a leaf is defunct in a stage where the new tuber at the base of it is
still very small, you have a death on your conscience. When the tuber is
already 3/4 matured, you have a chance........

Wilbert

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From: StellrJ at aol.com on 2001.05.23 at 20:21:48(6549)
In a message dated Wed, 23 May 2001 11:16:45 AM Eastern Daylight Time, mburack@mindspring.com writes:

<< I swear I dont understand how these things ever made it through the evolutionary process..... what plant makes one leaf per year? Dont animals or storms destroy these things in the wild like they do in cultivation???!!!!!???

Survival for a wild plant is partly a matter of luck. If these are tropical Asian species, then perhaps they avoid storm damage by growing in non-monsoon seasons. (Or, I could be all wrong.) With animals, it is purely luck -- do they grow along the animal's habitual daily route, or not?

Incidentally, in North America, the genus Trillium (Liliaceae) sends up but one growing shoot per year, with both leaves and flower. If picked, it will not grow again that year, but will wait in dormancy for the next; if picked in several consecutive years, it will die. And so, Trillium has been extirpated by browsing deer in certain areas where it would otherwise be found.

Jason Hernandez

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