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  Dracunculus vulgaris
From: grsjr at juno.com (George R Stilwell, Jr.) on 1997.04.01 at 15:11:22(556)
The Daffodil Mart in Glouster, VA is offering D. vulgaris, 22-24 cm
bulbs, 10/$25, 50/$106.
Sauromatum venosum 10/$10, 50/$42.
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From: Al Wootten <awootten at NRAO.EDU> on 1997.04.02 at 06:29:01(561)
George R. Stilwell, Jr. writes:
> The Daffodil Mart in Glouster, VA is offering D. vulgaris, 22-24 cm
> bulbs, 10/$25, 50/$106.
> Sauromatum venosum 10/$10, 50/$42.
> 50 Dragon plants and 50 Voodoo Lilies all in bloom, it blows the mind.
>
> Ray
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From: "James W. Waddick" <jim-jim at swbell.net> on 1997.09.30 at 07:45:37(1355)
Dear Aroid-L and International Bulb Society (address deleted)
There has been a few comments on the International Bulb Society
email robin about the foliage patterns of Dracunculus vulgaris. I hope
both Aroid -L and the International Bulb Society can shed some light on
foliage patterns in this species. Can anyone comment?
Is the amount of white/silver in the foliage
- genetically stable or variable?
- related to geographic origin?
- found in specific patterns?
- associated with named forms?
- coorelated with spathe colors?

I quote:
Some "Dracunculus vulgaris have green leaves or are ... marked with
white/silver. Which is "typical"?
J. Waddick

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From: Martyn Denney <martyn at denney.demon.co.uk> on 1997.10.01 at 06:29:53(1361)
In message , "James W.
Waddick" writes
>Dear Aroid-L and International Bulb Society (address deleted)
> There has been a few comments on the International Bulb Society
>email robin about the foliage patterns of Dracunculus vulgaris. I hope
>both Aroid -L and the International Bulb Society can shed some light on
>foliage patterns in this species. Can anyone comment?
> Is the amount of white/silver in the foliage
> - genetically stable or variable?
> - related to geographic origin?
> - found in specific patterns?
> - associated with named forms?
> - coorelated with spathe colors?
>
>I quote:
> Some "Dracunculus vulgaris have green leaves or are ... marked with
>white/silver. Which is "typical"?
> J. Waddick
>
> "Both plain green and silver-streaked leaves are typical of
>Dracunculus vulgaris; the degree of streaking varies quite a lot and some
>clones are very well marked indeed.
> I believe that I'm right in saying that most Dracunculus in
>commerce (at least in the past) have been wild collected and therefore the
>cultivated stock is very variable, unlike the grim uniformity of most bulbs
>propagated commercially.
>
> J. Grimshaw
>
> Thanks for input Jim Waddick
>
I believe it is also true that the division between plain leaves and
streaking is at least partly geographic.
All the forms I have seen in Crete have been streaked - no plain leaves
at all, whilst on Rhodes I recall plenty of plain leaved plants but none
with streaked leaves.
--
Martyn Denney
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From: plantnut at shadow.net (Dewey Fisk) on 1997.10.10 at 22:14:53(1424)
For those of you that have asked for a source for the subject plant...

Mrs. Teresa Glover
907 Buford Rd.
Cumming, GA 30731
(770) 887-0749

Enjoy!
Dewey

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From: Lester Kallus <lkallus at earthlink.net> on 1998.04.30 at 14:41:12(2062)
Living in zone 7a but with an 8a winter this past winter, I decided to try
Dracunculus vulgaris. I just received two and probably should have planned
earlier but didn't.

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From: "Plantsman" plantsman at prodigy.net> on 2001.02.15 at 12:22:40(5948)
Hello all,

I was wondering if anyone in the USA has a few blooming size dormant
Dracunculus vulgaris corms that they would be interested in selling
for a reasonable price. All mine are at least one or two years
away from being blooming size and I'm tired of waiting. Any
responses would be greatly appreciated.

Thanks,

David Sizemore

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From: Cgdz33a at aol.com on 2001.02.15 at 13:14:45(5949)
I ordered Dracunculus vulgaris from Park seed company this past fall (12 in
total) and 4 have just finished blooming and the rest should be any day now.
I was pleasantly suprised by their size.

Eric C. Morgan

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From: "Peter C Boyce" levieux.jardin at wanadoo.fr> on 2003.07.18 at 06:48:55(10407)
Dear All

I've just had a couple of private enquiries regarding Dracunculus vulgaris and I thought that my reply to these might also be of interest to roid-l folks.

-----

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From: James Waddick jwaddick at kc.rr.com> on 2003.07.22 at 07:52:31(10419)
Dear Alan- Your bicolor spathe form and
Wilbert's All white and
Peter's detailed report on this genus
inspired me to write a botanist friend in Turkey and here's
some comments to share:

"There are four variants of this plant ...:
1. Var. laevigatus Engler: described from Rhodos Island, was distinguished
by its smooth spadix and absence of sterile flowers; similar forms occur in
Europe.

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From: "Peter C Boyce" levieux.jardin at wanadoo.fr> on 2003.07.22 at 09:25:47(10420)
Dear Jim

With the possible exception of the hairy-spathed form Dracunculus vulgaris
is without much doubt one variable species - if you find that hard to
swallow, think of it in terms of human beings; some are tall, some short,
some pale skinned with red hair & green eyes, some pale skinned with white
hair and blue eyes, some dark skinned, some hairy, some less hairy, some
hairless, etc, etc.

Pete

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From: "Peter C Boyce" levieux.jardin at wanadoo.fr> on 2003.07.22 at 09:27:51(10421)
Oh, yes, on the basis of your Turkish friend there should be FIVE
varieties - if you have a variety other than the typical form then you must
also have var. vulgaris - how is THAT defined?

Pete

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