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  hybrids, ramblings, spare pollen
From: magrysbo at shu.edu on 2001.06.21 at 22:22:45(6825)
One more note as I finish reading my messages this evening and this strong
coffee. When you pollinate a titanum you will always have pollen to spare.
Don't neglect to propagate the pure species, but why not throw the extra on
a waiting konjac, or paeonifolius, albispathus, gigas, or Typhonium? Two
words for you (despite Wilbert's objections) - extremely marketable.
Bonaventure Magrys

From: mburack at mindspring.com on 2001.06.22 at 09:03:09(6833)
Marketable....maybe...... doable.......doubtful......
I have attempted hybridization of amorphophallus 9 times at this point...... It has never worked..... As I have said before..... probably the only shot of ANY kind of hybrid.... are "like" amorphs (ex. koratensis x opertus, paeoniifolius x prainii, etc.....)

I have attempted those "long stretch" crosses (konjac x paeoniifolius, etc.... and they just dont seem to work). Everyone must understand that IF these plants hybridized easily.... you would see a slew of them from aroid aficianados..... notice how you dont see them very often....... thats because you can "throw a little extra pollen on something"..... but what you will most likely get will be an "infloresence with some pollen on it"....nothing more...

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From: "Wilbert Hetterscheid" hetter at worldonline.nl> on 2001.06.22 at 22:14:45(6842)
I have no REAL objections, mind you. I am just putting things in certain
words to get juices running. The one thing I worry about is the
nomenclatural consequences of what people haphazardly do. A plant name
should UNAMBIGUOUSLY refer to an entity (a species or cultivar or whatever).
The Name Game HAS its purposes, how tiresome it sometimes is to people.

Wilbert

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From: StellrJ at aol.com on 2001.06.23 at 22:31:11(6863)
In a message dated Fri, 22 Jun 2001 12:03:16 PM Eastern Daylight Time, mburack@mindspring.com writes:

<<
thats because you can "throw a little extra pollen on something"..... but what you will most likely get will be an "infloresence with some pollen on it"....nothing more...

Darwin discussed this in _On the Origin of Species_. One of the ways plants separate themselves from their congeners is by rejecting foriegn pollen. Think about it...if all sympatric plants in a genus accepted each other's pollen, soon you would have just one (probably highly variable) species in that region. Nature very seldom hybridizes.

Jason Hernandez

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