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  pruning Anthuriums
From: Piabinha at aol.com on 2002.02.11 at 09:50:23(8188)
hi all,

is it possible to cut off all of an anthurium's leaves (for ease of shipment)
and not cripple it? i have an unidentified bird's nest type plant that i
bought as a seedling at a farmer's market. it's now huge and i wanted to
ship or transport it but with those huge leaves sticking out in all
directions, it is very difficult. could i cut off all the leaves and will it
sprout again from the crown?

tsuh yang

From: "Julius Boos" ju-bo at msn.com> on 2002.02.11 at 12:21:26(8189)
Dear Tsuh Yang,

I`d say yes, BUT---I`d cut off only about 1/2 or 3/4 off each of the topmost
leaves, say 4-6 of them, or as many as you can leave on and still pack the
plant, so that when re-potted the plant will have SOME green leaf-tissue
(the basal portions of the leaves you left on) to help it in it`s recovery.
Root trim the plant also.

Good luck,

Julius

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From: Durightmm at aol.com on 2002.02.11 at 12:39:42(8190)
I find that by cutting them severally is better. They will have respiration and it will be less shocking. New leaves will appear but having parts of all leaves is more effective Good luck. Joe

From: "Eduardo Goncalves" edggon at hotmail.com> on 2002.02.11 at 13:29:16(8191)
Dear Tsuh Yang,

Yes, it is possible to cut off all leaves of an anthurium specimen
and still have a nice plant in six months or so. That?s what I did in every
plant I brought from the field. Otherwise I would have to bring more or less
20 huge leafy Anthuriums in the plane! What a suitcase I would need! The
only problem is that some species are rather slow growers. I have a plant of
Anthurium thrinax I brought from Amap? state in August 2000 and it only has
two leaves (the second one appeared two months ago)...

Very best wishes,

Eduardo.

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From: Alektra at aol.com on 2002.02.11 at 19:19:08(8194)
What about just tying the petioles together in a sheaf, and then just
crumpling the leaves together with a cloth or paper wrapped around them? Even
if the leaves arrive mangled, some of the photosynthetic apparatus will
survive, and that will help the plant recover slightly faster. Just an idea.

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From: Krzysztof Kozminski kk at kozminski.com> on 2002.02.12 at 19:32:44(8196)
On Mon, 11 Feb 2002, Julius Boos wrote:

> I`d say yes, BUT---I`d cut off only about 1/2 or 3/4 off each of the topmost
> leaves, say 4-6 of them, or as many as you can leave on and still pack the
> plant, so that when re-potted the plant will have SOME green leaf-tissue
> (the basal portions of the leaves you left on) to help it in it`s recovery.
> Root trim the plant also.

Why trim the roots? I can see how trimming the top helps a plant that
lost some roots in transplanting (less evaporation preserves whatever
water can be taken up by the remaining roots), but why would root trimming
be of any help to a plant that lost its top is not clear to me...

Curiously,

KK

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From: Piabinha at aol.com on 2002.02.12 at 19:46:22(8197)
this plant's leaves are sticking out in all directions (as opposed to growing straight up vertically) so it's hard to prune it partially leaving some leaf material or to do it as you suggest. i have received some anth. in the past that were all pruned (only the stems and roots remaining) and they never put out new growth. but i guess it depends on the species and the plant. thanks for all your suggestions and replies.

tsuh yang

> What about just tying the petioles together in a sheaf, and then just

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