IAS Aroid Quasi Forum

About Aroid-L
 This is a continuously updated archive of the Aroid-L mailing list in a forum format - not an actual Forum. If you want to post, you will still need to register for the Aroid-L mailing list and send your postings by e-mail for moderation in the normal way.

  Chains and Hundredweights
From: "Petra Schmidt" petra at plantdelights.com> on 2002.04.22 at 12:55:13(8602)
I have my trusty "Hummert's Helpful Hints" (1997-1998 edition), not
cyperspace info...

1 chain = 100 links (Surveyor's Measure Table)

+More
From: "Julius Boos" ju-bo at msn.com> on 2002.04.22 at 19:37:19(8608)
>>I have my trusty "Hummert's Helpful Hints" (1997-1998 edition), not
cyperspace info...

1 chain = 100 links (Surveyor's Measure Table)

+More
From: StroWi at t-online.de (StroWi) on 2002.04.23 at 08:11:22(8610)
Whow!

Julius and others, thanks for clarification. Now I almost see through!

The only thing I wonder about is how much is a lb in kg or g?

Could it be 0,45359 kg??? I found this value in a little conversiontable, but I am not sure, if "this" is the right pound for the US or GB.

Over here in Germany it's more simple; we consider a pound to be just 1/2 kg = 500 g.

Greetings from a nearly enlightend continental,

Bernhard.

+More
From: "Cooper, Susan L." SLCooper at scj.com> on 2002.04.23 at 12:24:19(8617)
Hi
Bernhard

only thing I wonder about is how much is

+More
From: Alektra at aol.com on 2002.04.23 at 20:01:37(8620)
OK, folks, just when you thought you could breathe a sigh of relief and get
back to thinking about aroids, here I come with THE measurement webpage you
want to bookmark, or better yet, print out, bind, and put on your bookshelf.

This one page is almost 350K and it's very plain HTML, so if your computer is
slightly slow, just give it time to load the page.

http://www.nepo.go.th/ref/UNIT-ALL.html

+More
From: "George R Stilwell, Jr." grsjr at juno.com> on 2002.04.24 at 09:09:34(8624)
I use "Convert It" a small piece of shareware.

Pick a category like distance, voulmn, energy, time, etc.
Type in the original measurement and units and you see the equivalent
in most of the other units used and obsolete.

Nanostones, anyone? I know, that's a seedy subject.

Ray

+More
From: "Kathy Kempf" wont_read101 at hotmail.com> on 2002.04.25 at 19:21:45(8640)
0,45359 kg is 25,401 lbs (American). Now we are getting to a serious aroid
:===>) (We Americans do funny things with numerical punctuation)
One worlders beware!

+More
Note: this is a very old post, so no reply function is available.