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  Artificial trees
From: "Eduardo Goncalves" edggon at hotmail.com> on 2003.01.09 at 18:06:16(9801)
Dear Aroids,

Does any of you know of a picture (in a website) of an artificial tree?
Guys, I am from Brazil and we have (or had) lots of natural trees
everywhere. When you need a tree, is is easiear to browse around and you
will find a nice trunk. I can?t even wonder how it would look like a tree
made of pipes or foam! I was in Fairchild Gardens in September and I didn?t
noticed the presence of this tree. Please, help to calm down the curiosity
of a semi-civilized man!

Very best wishes,

Eduardo.

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From: "brian williams" pugturd50 at hotmail.com> on 2003.01.09 at 23:38:32(9802)
Here are PICS of some artificial trees I have seen at botanical gardens and
other places.

This was recent at Atlanta botanical gardens. I believe they were using foam

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From: "Craig Allen" callen at fairchildgarden.org> on 2003.01.10 at 14:39:38(9806)
Here is a picture though not clear of one of the trees at Fairchild. I just loaded it for a few weeks. Maybe the picture will remind you of the area the tree is in, if you went into the Conservatory. This is the small room before you get to the benched area with potted bromeliads, and the huge pot holding the dormant Mr. Stinky.

http://miata.cardomain.com/member_pages/view_page.pl?page_id 0116&page=7

Craig M. Allen

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From: Harry Witmore harrywitmore at witmore.net> on 2003.01.11 at 05:44:10(9807)
I took some pictures of the trees at Fairchild and Selby. Here's links to
the pictures.

http://www.cloudjungle.com/gardens/fairchild/

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From: "jeff rosenstiel" jjjj4 at attbi.com> on 2003.01.11 at 06:53:39(9808)
Craig,
Great pic of that tree! I remember seeing that!
But I would really! like that Car! Nice!!!!
Did you just get it?
Dont see many of them up here!
Jeff
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From: "Val Gillman" hortma at totheinter.net> on 2003.01.11 at 09:41:48(9811)
Thank you for the incredible photos! I must get to Fairchild soon. I wonder
how long a gnarly piece of oak would last in my greenhouse. Has anyone used
real wood for a display of this kind?
Valerie Gillman

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From: Harry Witmore harrywitmore at witmore.net> on 2003.01.11 at 12:12:47(9812)
I have tried dogwood but the bark come away quickly and the wood rots after
a few years. I think red cedar would do fine but it's hard to locate a tree
that look good. They tend to grow straight up. A gnarly oak would fit the
bill but I think the bark would rot quickly.

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From: Jonathan Ertelt jonathan.ertelt at vanderbilt.edu> on 2003.01.11 at 13:42:09(9814)
At 3:12 PM -0500 1/11/03, Harry Witmore wrote:

I have tried dogwood but the bark come away quickly and the wood
rots after a few years. I think red cedar would do fine but it's
hard to locate a tree that look good. They tend to grow straight up.
A gnarly oak would fit the bill but I think the bark would rot
quickly.

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From: "Eduardo Goncalves" edggon at hotmail.com> on 2003.01.11 at 15:10:05(9817)
Dear Craig and Harry,

Yes, I remember seeing trees like that but I thought they were somewhat
different natural trees. I would never wonder that they were artificial!
Thanks for the picture!!!

Very best wishes,

Eduardo.

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From: "Eduardo Goncalves" edggon at hotmail.com> on 2003.01.11 at 15:14:30(9818)
Oh Brian,

Thank you too for the great collection of picts showing artificial
trees, almost coast to coast! Yes, I was a sceptic but I have been
converted. I do believe in artificial trees!(and I like them)

Very best wishes,

Eduardo.

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From: "Val Gillman" hortma at totheinter.net> on 2003.01.11 at 18:52:35(9820)
thanks, Harry,
if the bark rots it should be good for the plants, right? One more question.
How do you secure them initially? I tried a recommended glue with
tillandsias and whatever the glue touched, died. The wrapped fishing line
leaves something to be desired.
Thanks,
Valerie

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From: Harry Witmore harrywitmore at witmore.net> on 2003.01.12 at 08:47:50(9824)
I have been successful gluing Tillandsias with Goop but when the older
leaves begin to turn brown they normally let go. The hope is that they
would have attached themselves by then. I have also fishing line but it
doesn't look very good as you said. I have also had good success using a
lightweight galvanized wire. I wrap it around the base and then thread that
down to the object your attaching it to. This has worked well in the past
and I have some that are 4 years old which are doing very well done this
way. If your afraid of galvanized wire ( I've heard some say it's poison to
Bromes) you could use plastic coated wire.

As for the rotting bark, well, it's just makes a mess and doesn't help much
but the plants on the ground below the tree.

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From: "Craig Allen" callen at fairchildgarden.org> on 2003.01.13 at 08:55:24(9833)
When the Conservatory was rebuilt after Hurricane Andrew we use Buttonwood branches for an epiphyte tree because there wasn't time to construct artificial ones. (I had 2 weeks to get the display build and planted) They lasted about two years, and buttonwood is fairly rot resistant. Then we built the cork trees. The orchid tree is three years old, and the bromeliad tree two years. Around here in Southern Florida oak wood rots even faster.

Craig M. Allen

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From: "Craig Allen" callen at fairchildgarden.org> on 2003.01.13 at 15:04:00(9835)
If you use glue, the best is Liquid Nails. The bromeliads seem to love it. Large plants I attach with screws and wire, something you can't indulge on a live tree.

Craig M. Allen

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From: "Val Gillman" hortma at totheinter.net> on 2003.01.13 at 22:35:22(9839)
I could look for sassafras but around here they stay very small and slender.
Val

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From: "Bryant, Harry E." HEBryant at scj.com> on 2003.01.14 at 08:28:10(9842)
My 2 cents worth. A memory from my youth.... Growing up in Kentucky I seem
to remember people using Black Locust for fence posts because they would not
rot (may not be applicable to the wet world in Florida). These are fast
growing trees, have hard brittle limbs, beautiful thick black bark, and in
the spring a fragrant bloom. I could see making a trip to areas where they
grow wild and collecting some limbs/trees to use or growing from seed if you
have the time ( As I remember they grow 2-3 feet a year in the wild. In a
greenhouse they might double that rate.)

Our friend in Louisville should have access to large quantities of these
trees. What do you think Brian?

Harry Bryant

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From: "Val Gillman" hortma at totheinter.net> on 2003.01.15 at 20:46:39(9845)
A few years ago our neighbor made a dock with locust poles for the support.
These leafed out and started growing. For some reason he cut them down. It
looked beautiful to me.
Val Gillman

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