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  Dracunculus foliage
From: James Waddick jwaddick at kc.rr.com> on 2003.04.29 at 07:06:47(10138)
Dear All;
A few years ago it seems like the only Dracunculus I ever saw
had all green foliage - without white chevron marks/stripes. Over
the last few years I have been more successful growing this species
and all my mature plants have these striking white chevrons. I recall
hearing that only certain geographic forms were so marked. True?

I noticed that seedlings and small offsets have clear unmarked leaves.

Any comments on the incidence of this marked/unmarked forms
of Dracunculus?

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From: "Peter Boyce" boyce at pothos.demon.co.uk> on 2003.04.29 at 12:08:14(10141)
Hi Jim

For a long time it was claimed that the heavily white-chevroned forms of
Dracunculus vulgaris were from Crete (there is even a variety cretensis,
recognized by Engler, for this leaf form). However, while it is true that
the vast majority of plants on Crete are so marked, the variegated form also
occurs in western Turkey and also crops up on other Aegea islands.

Pete

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From: "C. J. Addington" cjaddington at earthlink.net> on 2003.04.30 at 20:57:05(10153)
on 4/29/03 12:08, Peter Boyce at boyce@pothos.demon.co.uk wrote:

> Hi Jim
>
> For a long time it was claimed that the heavily white-chevroned forms of
> Dracunculus vulgaris were from Crete (there is even a variety cretensis,
> recognized by Engler, for this leaf form). However, while it is true that
> the vast majority of plants on Crete are so marked, the variegated form also
> occurs in western Turkey and also crops up on other Aegea islands.
>
> Pete

Hello All again!
It seems nobody talks about much of anything on here for ages, and then
all of a sudden the floodgates open, and the conversation gets really
interesting! This spurt of Dracunculus talk is right up my alley - I love
these guys and grow a bunch of them.
Last summer I used pollen from one of my heavily white-chevroned
Dracunculus to pollinate the bloom of a completely non-variegated plant just
as an experiment to see what would happen, such as what is dominant, how
many babies are chevroned, etc. That pollination produced a huge berry
cluster that I sprouted on my patio. I now have over a hundred cute little
mixed-pattern baby Dracunculus, and at this stage (1-2 leaves) not one of
them shows any white at all. So, either solid green is 100% dominant, or
babies just don't show any white chevrons. I look forward to rearing them up
to see the percentages of chevroned vs. plain green.
If anyone would like some of these babies (I cannot grow 100+ plants of
one thing on my patio!) I would be happy to share them, if you would just
let me know if it turns out green or chevroned. I think these guys are so
cool that everyone should grow them! Of course, I live in a Mediterranean
climate, so perhaps I am biased.
Love to hear about other folk's experiences with these neat plants.

Cheers!

CJ Addington

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From: Lewandjim at aol.com on 2003.05.01 at 04:21:39(10155)
In a message dated 5/1/2003 12:39:53 AM Eastern Daylight Time,
cjaddington@earthlink.net writes:

> Last summer I used pollen from one of my heavily white-chevroned

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From: "C. J. Addington" cjaddington at earthlink.net> on 2003.05.01 at 16:37:22(10157)
on 5/1/03 04:21, Lewandjim@aol.com at Lewandjim@aol.com wrote:

> Perhaps you should try the reverse cross using a "chevroned" pod parent. The
> "science" can get very complicated but if aroids share the three somatic
> layers (L1, L2, and L3) that hostas and many other plants have, then
> variegated inheritance might best be accomplished this way.

Hi Jim!
It never occurred to me that the direction of the pollination might
affect the rate at which the variegation is inherited. Of course, most of
the time I am limited by what I have handy - I use whatever pollen is
currently being dumped by a sexed-up bloom! : ) If the possibility arises
(and it well may this month as my various plants bloom) I will have to try
that cross in the other direction as you suggest. Also, I will try a direct
chevroned-to-chevroned pollination to see if I can intensify the chevron
effect. Thanks for the ideas!

PS - To all the Helicodiceros fans out there (I had NO idea there were so
many of you!), I think I now have enough people on my offset list for that
species to cover all the potential babies that my clump will produce.
However, I am just approaching my great, annual May and June
rinse-and-sort-athon, and should have lots of extra corms, offsets, seedling
corms and seeds of MANY different species of Arum, Biarum, Dracunculus,
Pinellia and other neat aroids. My garden and patio are only so large! I
would be happy to share and trade all the extras that I end up with. Once I
have a feel for what I have available I will send out some notices, or you
can just email me directly. I just love getting other people to grow some of
the plants that I love so much!

Have a great Mayday everyone!

Cheers!

Christopher "CJ" Addington

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From: SongString at aol.com on 2003.05.01 at 21:39:21(10158)
Anyone have the Amorphophallus Konjac? I bought a tuber a few years ago at
garage sale in Southern Ohio and had no idea what it was, until a few days
ago, when I did a search on the web and came across it. It is blooming for
the first time. The flies are having a great time around it and it is
starting to stink. A good sign huh. I have never seen anything grow so fast
in my life. IT grew about 6 feet in a week! The tuber was 13 lbs. and had
divided in two, so it is twins now. Plus I have some baby tubers also.

How rare are the A. Konjac? I'm assuming that is what I have, since it looks
just like all the photos I've seen on websites. I live in Northern Ohio.

Nancy

From: Al Wootten awootten at nrao.edu> on 2003.05.02 at 08:13:01(10161)
Nancy,
I have several here in Virginia, but none has poked its greenery above
the ground yet...A. bulbifer is coming up however, for the first time in
ages in the Spring rather than in the Fall...
Clear skies,
Al
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