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  MJ's Beat Up A. Konjac
From: Don Burns <burns at mobot.org> on 1997.06.05 at 14:17:08(803)
MJ,
My experience suggests that its bad to fool with mother nature.
I suggest that since this is the beginning of your growing
season, simply cut off the old leaf (do it just above the soil surface)
and leave the pot and tuber alone. Odds are that it will produce a new
leaf soon. Suggest you don't give it any water until it does produce
that new leaf. If it refuses to produce a new leaf in a month or so then
remove it from the medium. If you then see new growth stick it back in
the pot!

Regarding the A. bulbifer, I would make every effort to get it out in the
sun but shielded from the wind, but don't replant it any deeper than it
is. Some time back we had some discussion about growing Aroids inside, at our
places of work I believe. So I have been trying to grow Amorphophallus
bulbifer and variabilis in my office. Both developed 50 cm petioles that
were very skinny, about 6 to 8 mm in diameter. Neither petiole was strong
enough to stand on its own so I have supported both from above with a
length of string and a lightweight rubber band at the leaf end. The
bulbifer went dormant or died (have not yet exhumed the tuber or what
might remain). The A. variabilis looks very healthy but continues to
require support, the petiole never having grown larger in diameter. The
message here seems to be that sunlight (the real stuff) is important
given that tubers of the same plants grown outside at home are doing
extremely well.

Don

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From: plantnut at shadow.net (Dewey Fisk) on 1997.06.05 at 19:01:19(804)
I agree with all that Don said with the exception of the 'direct sun'. May
I suggest bright light or bright shade. I had some Amorphs. in the sun and
they damn near dies. Of cours, sun in Florida comes in at a more direct
angle than yours does... but, I still suggest caution on the sun... if
nothing else, the leaf will get sunburned if it is not weened out.....
Dewey

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From: "Carlo A. Balistrieri" <cabalist at facstaff.wisc.edu> on 1997.06.06 at 09:27:13(805)
At 09:03 PM 6/5/97 -0500, you wrote:
>I agree with all that Don said with the exception of the 'direct sun'. May
>I suggest bright light or bright shade. I had some Amorphs. in the sun and
>they damn near dies. Of cours, sun in Florida comes in at a more direct
>angle than yours does... but, I still suggest caution on the sun... if
>nothing else, the leaf will get sunburned if it is not weened out.....
>Dewey

I'll second that. Remember that many species are thought to be forest edge
inhabitants and seem to do well in disturbed areas--(see Aroideana issue).
Some shade would seem to be a benefit.

Carlo

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