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  when should I really plant the A. Konjac
From: SongString at aol.com on 2003.05.06 at 19:11:40(10194)
I was told that I should not put the A. Konjac in dirt until after it
finishes it's bloom, because it could rot the tuber/corm, or whatever you
want to call it. Do you all do that?

Every fall, I just dug up my A. konjac every year and put it in the basement
until spring, when I would replant it outdoors. This is it's first year to
bloom and I already planted it in dirt, like I always do. I've only had it
about 3-4 years though. I didn't even know what it was called until recently,
when I researched on the internet and found out what I had. I live in
northern Ohio.

Nancy

From: Steve Marak samarak at arachne.uark.edu> on 2003.05.07 at 09:28:09(10206)
Nancy,

I don't recall seeing a specific answer to your question, so I'll throw in
my two cents.

A. konjac is one of the easiest amorphophallus to get along with, as well
as probably the hardiest. Although I live in USDA zone 6 (NW Arkansas),
with winter temperatures every 5 years or so reaching -20 F/-26 C for
short periods, I leave my konjacs in the ground outdoors year round. I
have a small one in flower now in one of the beds; petioles will start to
appear in a few weeks.

For the first few years I had konjac, not knowing how hardy it was, I dug
it up each fall and kept it indoors. They flowered every year, usually
during spring break when my wife (a teacher) was home to fully appreciate
the aroma. Now that they are outdoors, they don't flower as regularly
(i.e., not every year), and when they do it's May instead of mid-March.

My advice would be if it's in dirt already, leave it there - mine stay in
dirt year round, and seem to do fine. But if it wasn't in dirt, I've leave
it alone until it was done flowering, then plant it when leaf/root growth
started.

I had only one clone for a long time, but even so if I had two tubers
flower about the same time I'd get some seed production on one of them.
(Not huge fruits like the dracunculus or sauromatum, but some.) But the
darn birds got them all before I did.

Steve

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