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  Dracunculus seeding...
From: Paul Tyerman ptyerman at ozemail.com.au> on 2003.09.20 at 03:21:01(10612)
>ranging from pea-sized yearlings to gnarly old monsters (ever notice how
>ugly Dracunculus corms get when you don't let them set seed for 4 or 5
>years?),

C.J,

I always have a bit of a chuckle when I hear comments about Dracunculus
seedings so easily for everyone. In many years of growing it I have never
had one single seed set on it, despite numerous flowers out at one time and
the like. Either I have a sterile clone, or the pollinating vector is not
present in my country/climate/locality (who knows which?).

The seedheads I have heard can be rather impressive, and I'd love to see
them for that reason alone as like you I have plenty of the little beggars
without seed as well . Out of interest, what do Dracunculus look
like when you HAVE had seed set? Given I have only ever seen non-seeded
ones obviously I have missed the "supermodel" variety and only get to see
my "Ugly Duckling" non-seeding for a lot more than 4 or 5 years .

Does anyone know what the pollinating vector is for Dracunculus? I am
assuming it is likely to be a carrion beetle or something like that, which
we don't have present in the Australian eco-system. I often have
pollination of Arum species, but never of Dracunculus (and I haven't had
Amorph konjac flower for me yet to find out whether it selfs or not).

It is always interesting to come across comments like these, so I'm glad
you made it. It just seems so strange to me thinking about Dracunculus
actually seeding, whereas you have to STOP yours doing so!!

Cheers.

Paul Tyerman

+More
From: "C. J. Addington" cjaddington at earthlink.net> on 2003.09.21 at 23:01:08(10614)
on 9/20/03 03:21, Paul Tyerman at ptyerman@ozemail.com.au wrote:

>> ranging from pea-sized yearlings to gnarly old monsters (ever notice how
>> ugly Dracunculus corms get when you don't let them set seed for 4 or 5
>> years?),

+More
From: "Cooper, Susan L." SLBryant at scj.com> on 2003.09.23 at 05:27:53(10617)
If
they made seeds I would have to plant them, since I have some kind of
psychological disorder that prevents me from discarding viable aroids.
CJ

I know what you mean, I have a hard time discarding even the dead ones!
Every year I plant a few dried up or dead tubers "just in case!"
Susan

From: Paul Tyerman ptyerman at ozemail.com.au> on 2003.09.24 at 01:52:28(10621)
>they made seeds I would have to plant them, since I have some kind of
>psychological disorder that prevents me from discarding viable aroids.
> CJ
>
>I know what you mean, I have a hard time discarding even the dead ones!
>Every year I plant a few dried up or dead tubers "just in case!"
>Susan
>

Susan and CJ,

It is such a relief to learn this is not just ME with this afflication. I
am gradually learning to overcome it though, as my garden is just plain
full and I can't fit that much more. Goddess knows what I am going to do
with all my various seedlings once they are bigger and need repotting into
individual pots or planting into the ground. I don't even want to THINK
about it.

A major victory this year has been the actual removal and putting into the
trash of a bunch of "mongrel" jonquils (I believe they were called "Straw"
and are definitely NOT my favourite )...... it was nice to finally be
able to do it. Still, it will be a while before I have enough of any
aroids to start thinking about throwing any of THEM out, although the
Arisaema flavum ssp abbreviatum (which I'm told is what we predominantly
have as A. flavum here in Aus) are starting to look that way to me given
their miserable flowers and their ability to survive absolutely anything
and still multiply prolifically. They are starting to worry me now!! I
think with those I am still at the stage of saving all of them, but I don't
think it will be long before I have to find some method of disposal of
those as well.

Aaaah, wouldn't it be nice if I had that problem with Arisaema sikokianum,
or A. ringens, or A. fargesii or ....... I think you get the drift.

At the moment I am watching the Arisaema seedlings from previous AEG seedex
all coming back above ground now, a bit bigger than last year. Waiting to
see which are still prolific and which have reduced in numbers during
dormancy. Also signs of the first shoots on some of the Amorphophallus and
adult Arisaemas...... while in the garden there are Dracunculus shooting
madly and Arums still flowering (A. orientale) and I keep checking other
species such as A. dioscoridis for buds...... spring is in full swing here
at the moment, but the Aroids are still only just realising it!!

Cheers.

Paul Tyerman

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From: ken at spatulacity.com on 2003.09.25 at 19:45:13(10629)
Hi again C.J.

My biggest A. konjac reaches to about the top of my ear. I'm 5'9" and it's
in its pot about 6" from the ground. The corm was 11" across and weighed
about 12 to 15 lbs. It had flowered earlier in the spring.

I don't know if that's remarkable or not. It's my first konjac. It's the
second season I've grown it and last year it was about 1' taller than a
similar sized corm is this year. But only two observations doesn't really
count!

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From: "Derek Burch" derek at horticulturist.com> on 2004.01.15 at 05:29:00(11017)
on 9/20/03 03:21, Paul Tyerman at ptyerman@ozemail.com.au wrote:

>> ranging from pea-sized yearlings to gnarly old monsters (ever notice how
>> ugly Dracunculus corms get when you don't let them set seed for 4 or 5
>> years?),

+More
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