IAS Aroid Quasi Forum

About Aroid-L
 This is a continuously updated archive of the Aroid-L mailing list in a forum format - not an actual Forum. If you want to post, you will still need to register for the Aroid-L mailing list and send your postings by e-mail for moderation in the normal way.

  Dear Botanists
From: Ted.Held at hstna.com on 2003.09.24 at 08:14:45(10622)
Dear all the good botanists on the list,

Do all green parts of a plant contribute to photosynthesis? Even stems,
midribs, and petioles? This would make sense to me. Why go to all the
trouble to make green pigment, which I assume to be chlorophyll, if it's
not intended to make sugars and whatnot? Sorry to ask such an elementary
question, but the botany books only seem to talk about photosynthesis in
relation to leaf blades. Sometimes even exposed roots turn green if exposed
to light.

+More
From: Jonathan Ertelt jonathan.ertelt at vanderbilt.edu> on 2003.09.24 at 09:27:59(10624)
At 11:14 AM -0400 9/24/03, Ted.Held@hstna.com wrote:

Dear all the good botanists on the list,

Do all green parts of a plant contribute to photosynthesis? Even stems,
midribs, and petioles? This would make sense to me. Why go to all the
trouble to make green pigment, which I assume to be chlorophyll, if it's
not intended to make sugars and whatnot? Sorry to ask such an elementary
question, but the botany books only seem to talk about photosynthesis in
relation to leaf blades. Sometimes even exposed roots turn green if exposed
to light.

Ted,

No question to elementary. Although there are likely exceptions, as
nature provides them with most any other "rule" we come up with, in
general, I'd say yes. And, in fact, even underneath the developing
bark there is chlorophyll photosynthesizing for as long as light
gets to it.

Jonathan

+More
From: "Derek Burch" derek at horticulturist.com> on 2003.09.24 at 10:07:06(10625)
It is a pretty safe assumption that any tissue with chlorophyll has the
potential to contribute to photosynthesis. As you say, why wouldn't it.
Dredging the depths of my murky mind, I remember seeing a paper some
years ago in which researchers shaved the long spiky bits (awns) that
most barley develops as part of each flower in the inflorescence, and
found that the yield of the crop was reduced. I have never shaved a
barley inflorescence from that day on, and feel the better for it. Derek

+More
Note: this is a very old post, so no reply function is available.