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  Permits- THANKS!
From: "Bryant, Susan L." <SLBryant at scj.com> on 2004.02.09 at 05:15:27(11123)
Thanks to everyone who replied on line and privately!
I thought I read somewhere I needed an agent at customs, that part confused
me!
Of course, I can't remember where I found that.......

Susan

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From: Betsy Feuerstein <ecuador at midsouth.rr.com> on 2004.02.09 at 09:09:14(11124)
Susan,

You need both a permit and a customs forwarding broker when you come into the
USA from a foreign country. The permit you get ahead of time. The broker you
contact when you come back into the USA. You need them to take your plants to
the place where they will be inspected by agriculture. Like in Miami it is the
smokehouse. Like coming into any of the NY airports, plants have to be taken to
Hoboken. They are not cheap. And most are not very good when it comes to small
shipments coming into the US. They do the big commercial orders first and then
if there is time, they get to you. If you have to leave the plants at the
entering location, the broker can forward the plants to you after they have
passed agricultural inspection.

Hope this helps.....

Betsy

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From: Don Martinson <llmen at wi.rr.com> on 2004.02.09 at 09:20:14(11125)
Thanks to everyone who replied on line and privately!
I thought I read somewhere I needed an agent at customs, that part confused
me!
Of course, I can't remember where I found that.......
Susan
It was my understanding that a customs broker is needed only for
larger (e.g.commercial) shipments.

I have an import permit and used to be able to bring a number of
things back from my various trips, including items of interest that I
might find in the local markets and gifts from other horticulturists.
Unfortunately, with the recent enforcement of the requirement for a
phytosanitary certificate, this is no longer possible.

--
Don Martinson

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From: Don Martinson <llmen at wi.rr.com> on 2004.02.09 at 12:53:50(11127)
Susan,

You need both a permit and a customs forwarding broker when you come into the
USA from a foreign country.

Not strictly true if you are carrying the items with you as personal
luggage. However, if you have boxes and boxes of plants, you might
encounter a problem. If you have a supplier who is willing to ship
and provide a phyto, that might work the best. No broker needed in
this case either.

--
Don Martinson

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From: Regferns at aol.com on 2004.02.09 at 14:31:42(11130)
Even when bringing in the plants as personal luggage, if you do have a lot of
plants, they have to be transported to the Agriculture Dept. by a bonded
company. Ag is usually away from the airport. I have used brokers, even kindly
airline employees, and at least twice, Ag inspectors themselves (but this is not
the norm). I've done 16 collection trips and I can honestly tell you that
getting plants inspected is always different. While there no doubt are federal
guidelines, Miami, New York, Los Angeles and San Francisco are all on
different pages.

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From: Betsy Feuerstein <ecuador at midsouth.rr.com> on 2004.02.09 at 18:54:28(11131)
I think you will find with the new regulations that you will have a far more
difficult time carrying anything through. Now Ag will pick up plants of less than
20 pounds free so far. It could take days to get it to Ag and then what do you
want done with them after that, i.e., sent to you or pick them up at Ag. It used
to be with less than I believe it was 16 plants they would inspect them and let
you through but it has been quite some time since I have seen them allow any such
thing. The guys at the airport really have little to do with plant inspection
other than you have them, and they must go to Ag. Every port is different. Most of
us think Miami is by far the most cooperative, but others may have had good
experiences with other ports. And of course, some have had not such good results
with Miami.

No matter where, I hope you have good luck.

When you ship plants into the US, you normally do have to have a broker to take
them to Ag from customs if they are declared such. Sometimes they will with small
packages just let them through, but lately they have been opening them and if
there is no permit, you never see them usually. Get my drift, the law is one way,
but what is done could be most anything. I have had seeds get through. I have had
seeds taken. I have had small boxes of plants go through without a problem.
Perhaps best to speak to the Ag station at whatever port you expect the package to
come into and ask them what to expect where they are since each station has
control over how things are handled making each station potentially different.

Betsy

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