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  Woodchuck problem
From: <r2ot at charter.net> on 2004.07.22 at 15:22:42(11787)
I have been having a problem with a woodchuck/woodchucks chewing up plenty of plants in the garden.If anyone knows a trick or something to scare them away or stop them from chewing up my plants I'd like to hear it

Best,zach

From: "Marge Talt" <mtalt at hort.net> on 2004.07.22 at 21:47:41(11789)
> From: r2ot@charter.net
> I have been having a problem with a woodchuck/woodchucks chewing
up plenty of plants in the garden.If anyone knows a trick or
something to scare them away or stop them from chewing up my plants
I'd like to hear it
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From: "plantsman" <plantsman at prodigy.net> on 2004.07.22 at 23:41:05(11790)
>
> I have been having a problem with a woodchuck/woodchucks chewing up
plenty of plants in the garden.If anyone knows a trick or something to scare
them away or stop them from chewing up my plants I'd like to hear it
>
>
> Best,zach
>
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From: "ron iles" <roniles at eircom.net> on 2004.07.23 at 05:47:13(11791)
What's a Woodchuck?

----- Original Message -----
To:

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From: "plantsman" <plantsman at prodigy.net> on 2004.07.23 at 13:35:57(11792)
----- Original Message -----
To:
Sent: Friday, July 23, 2004 12:47 AM
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From: "plantsman" <plantsman at prodigy.net> on 2004.07.23 at 13:59:30(11793)
> What's a Woodchuck?
>
==============
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From: Ellen Hornig <hornig at Oswego.EDU> on 2004.07.23 at 14:59:52(11794)
I once met a farm family who had had a pet woodchuck when the kids were
little. When it was hungry, it would stand in front of the refrigerator
and whistle (an evolutionary adaptation, no doubt :-)). It didn't bite
unless someone had Reese's peanut-butter cups and wouldn't share them...

Ellen

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From: "ron iles" <roniles at eircom.net> on 2004.07.23 at 15:29:14(11795)
Thank You David & Ellen for your very refreshingly funny & "different"
anecdotes about the dreaded GroundHog!

Great!

Ron

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From: "Julius Boos" <ju-bo at msn.com> on 2004.07.23 at 15:40:52(11796)
>From: Ellen Hornig
>Reply-To: aroid-l@lists.ncsu.edu
>To: aroid-l@lists.ncsu.edu
>Subject: Re: [aroid-l] Woodchuck problem
>Date: Fri, 23 Jul 2004 17:59:52 -0400 (EDT)

Hi All,
BUT---the main question sshould be---
"How much wood could a woodchuck chuck,
IF a woodchuck could chuck wood?!?!?"
(a tongue-twister from my childhood)
Julius

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From: "Marge Talt" <mtalt at hort.net> on 2004.07.24 at 02:25:56(11797)
That does surprise me. The ones that used to live here never climbed
anything! Amazing. You just never know with critters; they, like
plants are a constant source of new knowledge.

Marge Talt, zone 7 Maryland
mtalt@hort.net

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From: "Marge Talt" <mtalt at hort.net> on 2004.07.24 at 02:27:56(11798)
> From: Ellen Hornig
> I once met a farm family who had had a pet woodchuck when the kids
were
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From: "Peter Boyce" <peterboyce at myjaring.net> on 2004.07.24 at 23:02:37(11799)
Perhaps we need to look at alternative organic solutions. In Laos the farmers deal with extraordinarily destructive cane rats in padi fields by the simple expedient of BBQing them (the cane rats, not the padi fields).

So.... is woodchuck good eating? If yes, perhaps you could initiate a bounty system with the local kids (as is done in Laos; the kids use catapults with deadly accuracy (not just on the cane rats either; I had a bruised butt to prove that point)) and then have the woodchuck equivalent of a clam-bake?

Pete

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From: Don Martinson <llmen at wi.rr.com> on 2004.07.25 at 00:53:06(11800)
Perhaps we need to look at alternative organic solutions. In Laos
the farmers deal with extraordinarily destructive cane rats in padi
fields by the simple expedient of BBQing them (the cane rats, not
the padi fields).

So.... is woodchuck good eating?

Umm... I'm afraid this would fall under the category of a sort of
"temperate climate bushmeat" or even worse, roadkill. Could be some
nasty pathogens lurking there. In other words, "Caveat consumptor"!
--
Don Martinson

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From: "MJ Hatfield" <mjhatfield at oneota.org> on 2004.07.25 at 09:22:56(11802)
OR, purchase/save enough set aside habitat/land for the woodchucks so that
they have other places to feed.

MJ Hatfield

From: "Harry Witmore" <harrywitmore at witmore.net> on 2004.07.25 at 09:51:09(11803)
Well, we don't have woodchucks but we have squirrels. I don't want to
eat either although I haven't tried woodchuck. I pretty much just try to
live in harmony or disharmony with the creatures here in the North
Carolina woods. They get some of my plants but I don't give the access
to the ones they like the best (Rhipsalis). I have a boxer that likes to
chase the squirrels but we won't let her get them and squirrels won't
either.

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From: "ron iles" <roniles at eircom.net> on 2004.07.25 at 10:10:43(11804)
I inhabit a magnificent crater Nature Reserve valley degraded by cows &
sheep, would woodchuck burrows make them extinct & give the wild orchids a
chance? Needless to say, I'm NOT being serious, unless I gotta be!

R

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From: "Ann McCulloh" <amcculloh at cbgarden.org> on 2004.07.25 at 10:20:48(11805)
Like many successful animal species - Woodchuck numbers will expand to
fill available habitat, whether or not humans are in that space. Deer,
raccoons, woodchucks, squirrels, geese, etc. can thrive in the same
habitats as people, and have become de-sensitized to our presence from
necessity.

With thousands of acres of relatively "wild" territory all around,
woodchucks choose to burrow under our garage because the slab makes a
nice roof for them, not because they've been driven out of the woodpiles
and creek banks that abound in the area. And they ravage the garden
because the cultivated plants are tender, tasty and available, not
necessarily because there's a great shortage of "wild" fodder. We create
pleasant circumstances for ourselves, and some of the more adaptable
mammals share our tastes!

Please don't get me wrong - I am all for expanding our reserves of wild
land (and keeping them free of mining, timbering, etc.) That will make a
critical difference to many vulnerable species - I just don't think
woodchucks will "keep to their place" if we give it to them!

Ann E. McCulloh

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From: "plantsman" <plantsman at prodigy.net> on 2004.07.25 at 11:30:32(11806)
Perhaps we need to look at alternative organic solutions. In Laos the
farmers deal with extraordinarily destructive cane rats in padi fields by
the simple expedient of BBQing them (the cane rats, not the padi fields).

So.... is woodchuck good eating? If yes, perhaps you could initiate a bounty
system with the local kids (as is done in Laos; the kids use catapults with
deadly accuracy (not just on the cane rats either; I had a bruised butt to
prove that point)) and then have the woodchuck equivalent of a clam-bake?

Pete

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From: "MJ Hatfield" <mjhatfield at oneota.org> on 2004.07.25 at 14:00:12(11808)
OK then, I am lucky. I've lived with woodchucks for 21 years, 4-5 burrows
surrounding my house and gardens (only 1 active per year) and never (knock
on wood) had a problem with them in the gardens. But then I've never had a
problem with the rabbits either. I always figured since I garden with
natives as well as exotics and that I leave plenty of wildness about that it
allowed them to leave my "special" stuff alone. I guess I'll count my
blessings rather than assume that it was something I did.

As a side note on my Amorphophallus (after all this is an Aroid list), last
year was hot and dry. So this year I potted all my Amorph tubers is a less
well drained mix. We then proceeded to have a cold/cool wet spring/summer. I
just knew the tubers were sitting in pots rotting but I didn't have time to
re-pot them. But, as good luck would have it, every single day as I checked
on them, 1-7 of the pots had growth emerging. Out of 250+ pots I am only
missing new growth in about 20+ of them and still getting 1 new growth per
day.

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From: "Julius Boos" <ju-bo at msn.com> on 2004.07.25 at 14:08:51(11809)
>From: "Peter Boyce"
>Reply-To: aroid-l@lists.ncsu.edu
>To:
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From: "ron iles" <roniles at eircom.net> on 2004.07.25 at 14:28:41(11810)
Green Iguanas! Another added to my diet, the muscovies come frozen. Sorry about this Mr. Moderators.

R
----- Original Message -----

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From: "ron iles" <roniles at eircom.net> on 2004.07.25 at 14:36:17(11811)
P.S. David. Did your grannie ever eat the chihahua?

Peter To supplement your meagre income from your Borneo market plant stall
why not ask MacDonalds if they want you to supply Cane Rat substitutes for
Woodchuck sbutties with Monstera Fruit & even Durian?

Isn't Life fun?

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From: "Peter Boyce" <peterboyce at myjaring.net> on 2004.07.25 at 14:58:23(11812)
>He had a little chihuahua dog named Ricky that would go into
> the burrow after them and drag them out and then he would shoot them.

He! David that's one smart dog; so much easier on the teeth - I must inform
my hound (who's kinda dopey) he's been going about this hunting thing all
wrong.

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From: "Peter Boyce" <peterboyce at myjaring.net> on 2004.07.25 at 15:09:36(11813)
Julius' point is a VERY salient one; depending on where you garden in the world someone's treasured pet can be a major pest.

Here in Sarawak monkeys (especially the cute silver leaf monkey which in former less-enlightened times was the one sold in pet shops in Europe and the US) are a major pest of orchards; a small group will devastate an orchard of fruit eating what they can and ruining the remainder by biting the fruit to see if it's ripe.

At the ultimate extreme, at least two national parks in Thailand have had to go to the astronomical expense of installing anti-elephant fences to protect their nursery plantations from roaming herbs (elephant populations in Thailand ore increasing at teh same time the forests are shrinking - a bad combination).

Mercifully elephants aren't known to burrow and haven't yet figured that they could climb over the barrier if they had a step ladder....

Pete

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From: "plantsman" <plantsman at prodigy.net> on 2004.07.25 at 20:42:23(11815)
You describe my situation very much. I live right in the middle of a good
sized subdivision fronting a very busy highway and there's plenty of wild
land around us. We have deer, turkey, rabbits, squirrels, chipmunks,
opossums, skunks, foxes and who knows what else that's regularly seen and/or
encountered in our yards. Thirty-five years ago when I first moved here as
a kid, the only wild animals around here were the occasional rabbit, opossum
and skunk and that was before the subdivision grew and it was mostly empty
fields and woodlands around us. Groundhogs are definitely opportunists.

David Sizemore

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From: "Marge Talt" <mtalt at hort.net> on 2004.07.26 at 00:52:59(11817)
Realize this is not aroid related, but am very curious about what one
would use to make a fence that would stop a determined elephant.

Marge Talt, zone 7 Maryland
mtalt@hort.net

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From: "Bryant, Harry E." <HEBryant at scj.com> on 2004.07.26 at 05:42:38(11820)
Re: the ground hog problem.


http://www.bugspray.com/catalog/products/page502.html claims ROPEL will
drive the buggars away. I have no experience with them personally. I
probably have relatives in Kentucky that would say the make a good stew, but
these are the same ones that eat squirrel brains and road kill. 8 )

Harry Bryant

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From: "Peter Boyce" <peterboyce at myjaring.net> on 2004.07.26 at 14:22:13(11826)
Hi Marge

Steel 15 x 20 cm, 6 m long I-beams (known as RSJ's in the UK) buried and
concreted 3 meters into the ground at 1 meter intevals and then disguised by
coating them in a concrete-soil mixture that very quickly becomes moss- and
lichen covered.

Pete

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From: "Enid" <enigo at bellsouth.net> on 2004.07.27 at 19:07:09(11848)
Hi All,
A cheaper alternative would be twenty or thirty dollars worth of rubber mice
(approx. a dollar each as a cats toy. They are available in most pet stores)
sprinkled amongst the perennial garden should do the trick. ..everyone
knows pachyderms fear mice...hehe

Enid

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From: "Peter Boyce" <peterboyce at myjaring.net> on 2004.07.29 at 00:32:47(11869)
Ah, yes, but then the elephants will panic and trample up and down looking
to escape... or worse will climb into nearby fruit trees where you won't be
able to see them because they paint their toenails red and pretend to be
bunches of cherries...

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