IAS Aroid Quasi Forum

About Aroid-L
 This is a continuously updated archive of the Aroid-L mailing list in a forum format - not an actual Forum. If you want to post, you will still need to register for the Aroid-L mailing list and send your postings by e-mail for moderation in the normal way.

  Tubers bought in a market.
From: Neil Gordon neil at ng23.abelgratis.co.uk> on 2005.01.16 at 10:24:30(12576)
I just did my shopping in a local market, and saw (and bought) some
tubers that look suspiciously like Amorphophaulls tubers - although the
area where the stalk detaches doesnt look quite right, the shop next
door had some that looked the same that did have the leaf scar on the
tuber, but id bought the others already and didnt have enough to buy
these ones.

These are about 6 inches across, and to me, look like theyre amporphs.

What i want to know is, which kind of Amorphophallus tubers are edible,
and out of those, which ones would I most likely be able to find in an
Indian fruit and veg market.

I will be eating one of them in tonights curry! do they have a
particular taste or are they just yam like? The other ones going to be
saved and grown in the spring!

I guess the only way to know is to wait until spring when they do start
growing to find out, but im impatient now i found them!

Neil

+More
From: Neil Gordon neil at ng23.abelgratis.co.uk> on 2005.01.16 at 11:21:17(12577)
Ok, Ive 'gone in'.

The inside of this tuber is a white flesh, with a purple marble type
pattern throughout it. The skin (which is brown, has an almost beetroot
colour right next to the flesh when scraped away.
Its very slimy! About as slimy as Okra inside! (Which are also going in
the curry!).

Ive had a search throughout google, and 'Kand' as it was labled in the
market, seems to be a fairly non specific name for types of Yam and
Yam-like tubers.

Could this be 'Purple Yam' - which ive seen on one or two recipes that
use 'Kand', in which case its a Dioscorea, not an Amorph. :-(

Neil

+More
From: Kyle Baker kylefletcherbaker at yahoo.com> on 2005.01.16 at 18:03:29(12579)
Neil? where did ya buy it? its called
"kand"?interesting...I have grown alot of ginger
tubers from asian markets...so am always interested in
plants bought at ethnic markets...kfb


+More
From: "Steve Ritchey" sritchey at shreve.net> on 2005.01.16 at 20:17:46(12581)
Well, you're in the U.K. and I'm in Texas, but here, this would most likely
be Xanthosoma violaceum- Supermarket chains send in crates of these and
Colocasias around Easter even though the local produce people have no idea
what they are or what to do with them- I don't think anyone here ever eats
them, but gardeners buy them for foundation plants and treat them like a
summer "bulb"- They store better than potatoes in our climate, but I can't
eat them without a heavy dose of slow-cooked garlic, olive oil, salt, and
Java pepper :-) Bon apetit!!
+More
From: "Donna McGraw" donnamcg at swbell.net> on 2005.01.17 at 09:20:51(12585)
> Well, you're in the U.K. and I'm in Texas, but here, this would most
likely
> be Xanthosoma violaceum- Supermarket chains send in crates of these and
> Colocasias around Easter even though the local produce people have no idea
>

Steve, where in Texas are you? I'm just northwest of Houston near Tomball.
I'm getting curious about going on a supermarket "collecting trip" - I'll
report back - there are several Asian grocery stores near me.

Donna

+More
From: Thomas.Croat at mobot.org on 2005.01.17 at 11:23:26(12586)
Title: RE: [Aroid-l] Tubers bought in a market.

Steve: Are you sure that they are X. sagittifolium? According to Eduardo Gon?alves the species that they cultivate in Florida is X. robustum Schott.

Tom

+More
From: Neil Gordon neil at ng23.abelgratis.co.uk> on 2005.01.17 at 14:04:36(12588)
There were 2 asian veg shops that had these things, in Tooting High
Street, London. (About halfway up, by blockbusters!) but theres quite a
few other good ones in that street.

Theyve always got realy strange looking food in there! I was also going
to buy a 'wood apple', a round, apple sized 'fruit', with a grey/brown
mottled coloured surface, which was as hard as a coconut outside, I
guess you crack it open, and the good stuffs inside. Unfortunately Id
spent all my money and couldnt get one!

I love going there and planting the seeds of these bizzare foods.
Unfortunately only one or two survive to a decent size. Ive got a nice
3 foot high Guava tree, which is fairly happy, considering all the
stress ive put it through!

Neil

+More
From: piaba piabinha at yahoo.com> on 2005.01.17 at 16:52:56(12589)
if as you describe, it has a "wound" where the leaf
attaches, then it would not be a Dioscorea, would it?

i thought the most common "yam" in indian cuisine was
Amorphophallus paeoniifolius???

+More
From: "Steve Ritchey" sritchey at shreve.net> on 2005.01.17 at 18:21:34(12590)
Hi Donna- I'm way up on the OK line west of Texarkana- I think Tomball is
getting to be like downtown Houston now- I get these at Kroger's in
Shreveport, LA- They only get one shipment a year- once they're gone that's
it-The ones from aroid dealers seem to be clones selected for best stem
color, but the ones from the grocery are really vigorous and a cheap thrill
if you just keep them well watered- I'm always on the lookout for ones with
a different skin color-I have a lot of unidentifiable oddballs now- I think
your opportunities are better in the Asian markets of Houston ( east side of
the I-10 loop)-
Pineapple express from Baja last 2 weeks now Arctic express from Canada this
week - Yup! This is Texas :-)
Steve
+More
From: "Steve Ritchey" sritchey at shreve.net> on 2005.01.17 at 19:07:33(12591)
Title: RE: [Aroid-l] Tubers bought in a market.

Hi Tom-
Not sure what you mean- many of them sold in
groceries here are certainly sagittifolium or robustum, but I don't know
how to tell for sure which is which (Enlighten me, please!) On the topic of the
original post I i.d. violaceum on the clusters and shapes of the tubers as well
as the brown/purple color of the dormant buds and skins on the tubers-Some
clones are obviously more beautiful than others - Anyway , they're one of God's
few creations that like August in Texas as long as you keep them
wet:-)
Steve

+More
From: "Eduardo Goncalves" edggon at hotmail.com> on 2005.01.18 at 03:01:09(12592)
Dear Steve,

As far as I could see personally or on the web, only a few
collectors in USA have real X. sagittifolium. Most material I could see from
groceries are X. robustum, but I could also see X. mafaffa and a pure green
form of X. atrovirens.

Very best wishes,

Eduardo.

+More
From: Neil Gordon neil at ng23.abelgratis.co.uk> on 2005.01.18 at 14:36:18(12593)
It tasted quite nice in the end, a very nutty, potato flavour!

Heres a link to a scan of the other one (a digital camera would be so
handy - hmph) so its no the best to see from.

The white line is 10cm to scale.
http://www.ng23.abelgratis.co.uk//plant/Tuber.jpg

Anyway, its gone a bit mouldy on the outside at the bottom today, so it
probably wont last the winter. It shall be kept well away from my other
plants as well!

Right, im off to dust its bottom.

Neil

+More
From: Kyle Baker kylefletcherbaker at yahoo.com> on 2005.01.19 at 05:59:33(12594)
Could you folks list the tubers you've found in
markets as here in maine we've several very good asian
markets and they have some of the strangest looking
roots I've seen....am growing several types of gingers
from there but notice yams...what look like taro and
some turnip looking things
I
d love to do some research and start growing em....thx
kfb

+More
From: "Steve Ritchey" sritchey at shreve.net> on 2005.01.19 at 10:02:01(12596)
Thanks Eduardo-

I think the ones I get at the market are imported. They put them out in
large rustic crates unlike the pine or oak crates made in the States. I'll
have to look for labels or marks that show the country of origin when they
arrive this spring.

Does robustum or sagittifolium have any peculiarities that distinguish one
from the other? I haven't been able to determine this from looking at
photos on the web. A lot of variable plants are labelled sagittifolium and
the three photos I can find labelled robustum aren't helpful.

Regards,
Steve

+More
From: "Steve Ritchey" sritchey at shreve.net> on 2005.01.19 at 14:59:42(12597)
Definitely not the Xanthosomas we get at the market here, but should I ever
decide to cook more Xanthosomas, your idea of making a curry is certainly a
sound one. No 'nutty potato flavour' on these- they need all the spice and
pizazz one can give them :-)
+More
From: RAYMOMATTLA at cs.com on 2005.01.21 at 16:32:17(12598)
The ones I got at Walmart this past spring were labeled from Ecuador (Malanga). They turned out to be X. violeceum. I have picked up a few at Kroger (supermarket) that turned out to be X. saggitifolium. They were labled Arum americanum at the supermarket but I knew better. Unfortunately, none of the Asian markets (the very few we have in the Upstate area of South Carolina), have much variety in the produce department. Local Indian stores sell Suran but canned only. None of the Hispanic groceries even know what Malanga is...what is the Mexican name for this?
Michael
_______________________________________________
+More
From: RAYMOMATTLA at cs.com on 2005.01.21 at 16:38:33(12599)
The tubers from Kroger looked quite different from what i have labled as X. robustum. Perhaps they are the pure green form of atrovirens, like Eduardo says. Mature leaves are much more hastate. The form I aquired from this place are probably 12 years old (I picked them up as a teenager) and have continued growing them here.
Michael
_______________________________________________
+More
From: "Eduardo Goncalves" edggon at hotmail.com> on 2005.01.22 at 06:20:59(12602)
These are vernacular names names for X. robustum in Northern Latin America:
capote, pixi (Mexico); quequesque, marac (Guatemala); quiscamote and
quiscamo (Honduras).

+More
Note: this is a very old post, so no reply function is available.