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  Arum lily (reed) frog
From: Emily.Yates at mobot.org on 2005.03.29 at 09:18:53(12805)
Title: Arum lily (reed) frog

Does anyone on the list know of references, reprints of articles, or research on the relationship of the Arum lily (reed) frog, Hyperolius horstocki, and the arum lily, Zantedeschia aethiopica? This tiny frog (I believe endemic to South African Fynbos) inhabits the inflorescence of the Arum lily and can change its color to match its background inside the Arum lily for camoflauge. Beyond that I am having difficulty locating much information on this cool little creature, and would like to know more if anyone has experience with it.

Thanks for your help,

Emily

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From: Jonathan Ertelt jonathan.ertelt at vanderbilt.edu> on 2005.03.31 at 13:30:31(12811)
Title: Re: [Aroid-l] Arum lily (reed)
frog

Does anyone
on the list know of references, reprints of articles, or research on
the relationship of the Arum lily (reed) frog, Hyperolius
horstocki, and the arum lily,
Zantedeschia aethiopica? This tiny frog (I believe endemic to
South African Fynbos) inhabits the inflorescence of the Arum lily and
can change its color to match its background inside the Arum lily for
camoflauge. Beyond that I am having difficulty locating much
information on this cool little creature, and would like to know more
if anyone has experience with it.

Thanks for your help,

Emily
Emily,

Here's a site with an illustration of one clutching a
spadix:
http://passport.panda.org/campaigns/campaign.cfm?uNC865265&uCampaignId&1

if you enter
the scientific name into the google search engine, several sites come
up with information.

Jonathan

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From: "Steve Ritchey" sritchey at shreve.net> on 2005.03.31 at 18:28:16(12813)
Title: Arum lily (reed) frog

Hi Emily,
This doesn't only happen in Africa. Z. aethiopica
is in full flower here now, not minding the light frosts. Our native
"Tree Frogs", what I believe to be Litoria caerula (only mine have black stripes
surrounded in white that I have never seen in photos of the species) turn
from lime green to a chalky white whether nestled in a Zant spathe or
climbing the stuccoed walls of my house.

I guess they are lying in wait to gobble up the
first pollenator to visit the spadix. It's hard to imagine these litttle 5 cm.
frogs eating the Yellow Jacket wasps that are the main pollenators here, but
either that, or they just hang in there for the occasisional fly or gnat during
warms spells.

Also, really enjoyed the last IAS newsletter.
After spending most of my adult life travelling for an oil company, I like good
writing that makes me feel like I wuz there without ever! getting on a plane
:-)

Steve

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From: LMassey628 at aol.com on 2005.04.01 at 17:43:02(12817)
In a message dated 4/1/2005 12:36:51 PM Eastern Standard Time, jonathan.ertelt@vanderbilt.edu writes:
Does anyone on the list know of references, reprints of articles, or research on the relationship of the Arum lily (reed) frog, Hyperolius horstocki, and the arum lily, Zantedeschia aethiopica?

Speaking of Zantedeschia aethiopica - is there any trick to getting one to bloom ? I have had mine for years now, the plant is beautiful and healthy. It is grown in a large pot that I have sitting in a bird bath for constant moisture. It gets filtered sun.
Does it need full sun ? What can I do to get flowers ?
Thank you.

Linda

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From: "Julius Boos" ju-bo at msn.com> on 2005.04.04 at 03:43:06(12826)
>From: Jonathan Ertelt <jonathan.ertelt@vanderbilt.edu>
>Reply-To: Discussion of aroids <aroid-l@gizmoworks.com>
>To: Discussion of aroids <aroid-l@gizmoworks.com>
>Subject: Re: [Aroid-l] Arum lily (reed) frog
>Date: Thu, 31 Mar 2005 15:30:31 -0600

Dear All,

This discussion about the tiny frog inhabiting the bloom of the native
African Zantedescia sps. ("Arum lily") brings to mind something that I know
of in Trinidad, W.I.
Many years ago I was trying to collect one of the rarest of the many frog
species we have on Trinidad, Flectonotus (Gastrotheca) fitzgeraldi, the
Trinidad Marsupial frog, called that because it incubates its few large eggs
in a 'marsupium' or pouch/groove along its dorsum. I was told that the
way to see this little (finger-joint sized) frog was near the Bat caves near
Tamana in Central Trinidad`s jungle. One of my Mentors, Dr. Jack Price,
had collected it there when working w/ Dr. Jake Kenny on the frogs of
Trinidad and Tobago. HERE COMES THE AROID CONNECTION!! Jack told me
that it lived in the basal leaf-sheaths of a giant Xanthosoma sp.
(Xanthiosoma cf. undipes), known locally as 'wild tannia' that grew there.
I made a trip and climb to these caves where we discovered this plant
was abundant near the entrances to these smelly bat caves, and after much
chopping and searching we did see this little tree-frog slipping
effortlessly in and out of the sheaths, NOT easy to catch! I wonder if
perhaps this plant , besides providing a moist/wet safe haven in its basal
leaf sheaths for this tiny frog, might also provide a higher temp. than that
of the surrounding air?? I was also thinking that perhaps the higher
temperature produced within the spathe of Zanthedescia would be advantagous
to a tiny frog, plus of course the insects provided as food and attracted to
the scent of the bloom at anthesis???? All food for thought and further
research!

Cheers,

Julius

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From: "Deni Bown" deni at yaxhampark.co.uk> on 2005.04.04 at 07:01:20(12828)
Title: Arum lily (reed) frog

The reference I gave in my book Aroids –
Plants of the Arum Family is Whitfield, P., ed. 1984. Longman Illustrated
Animal Encyclopaedia. I don’t have anything more scientific.
As a matter of interest, when peering into the open spathe of a Typhonodorum
inflorescence in Madagascar
recently, I saw a perfectly camouflaged yellow and white frog nestled between
the white spathe and yellow spadix – obviously a different species from
the one in S Africa but suggesting that this topic
might indeed be an interesting piece of research.

Hope this helps. Would be interested
to hear if you uncover more info, as after plants (and aroids in particular),
my main interest is amphibians.

Deni Bown

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From: "Steve Ritchey" sritchey at shreve.net> on 2005.04.04 at 16:49:54(12830)
It turned too cool for the wasps to be out on the callas this weekend, but
had plenty of small flies. The instant one lands on the spathe, the frogs'
eyes open and zap!- lunch. Then they close their eyes and become virtually
invisible again. They either can't detect the flies landing on the spadix
behind them or just ignore them til another one lands directly in front of
them on the spathe.

I have some aethiopica 'Kiwi Blush' getting ready to flower. It will be
interesting to see if they can match this spathe color, or just stay green
parked on the leaves.

Steve

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