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  Alocasia robusta & Colocasia gigantea
From: Thaumaturgist asitkghosh at yahoo.com> on 2005.05.20 at 10:30:27(12950)
Anyone in this list growing or had grown those plants?

Asit K. Ghosh

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From: "Harry Witmore" harrywitmore at witmore.net> on 2005.05.21 at 05:42:41(12951)
I have both.

Harry Witmore

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From: RAYMOMATTLA at cs.com on 2005.05.21 at 07:25:10(12952)
Colocasia gigantea is MUCH easier to grow..at least for me. In fact it has become somewhat of a weed. It is also very hardy to cold temps. Thin plants out in the spring if you want to get larger plants. I had one get a 10 foot spread when it wasnt competing with a dozen or so pups around it. Alocasia robusta gets bigger, but you need to be in a ultra-tropical location for it to attain gigantic proportions. It also seems more suseptible to rot. One suggestion for Alocasia robusta....Dont water it unless the soil is very dry.
Michael
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From: Peter Matthews pjm at gol.com> on 2005.05.22 at 23:06:58(12953)
As an edible stem vegetable (cultivar only, not the wildtype)
Colocasia gigantea grows as far north as about 35 degrees N. in Japan.

Here it is a summer crop that can be left in the ground over winter,
with mulch and soil to protect the apical tips from cold damage (can
survive this way under snow).

Under these conditions, it does not grow so high as in the tropics,
but it can still be a pretty plant.

P.
--
Peter Matthews (Dr)

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From: "Julius Boos" ju-bo at msn.com> on 2005.05.23 at 14:43:50(12954)
<aroid-l@gizmoworks.com To: Discussion of aroids aroid-l@gizmoworks.com
Subject: Re: [Aroid-l] Alocasia robusta
Colocasia gigantea Date: Mon, 23 May 2005 15:06:58

Dear Peter,

I THINK the Colocasia being grown as a leaf-veggie in Japan may be Colocasia
e. esculenta, NOT Colocasia gigantea, the latter may be a less cold hardy
species!
Please let us know.

Thanks,

Julius

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From: Peter Matthews pjm at gol.com> on 2005.05.23 at 19:54:26(12955)
Title: Re: [Aroid-l] Alocasia robusta & Colocasia
gigantea

Thanks for asking...

Colocasia esculenta (sat-imo in japanese) is the main species
grown, usually for the corms, but some cultivars are also used as stem
vegetables.

Colocasia gigantea (hasu-imo in Japanese) is only grown as a stem
vegetable, with an almost completely non-acrid petiole (can be peeled
and then sliced thinly and eaten as a vinegared pickle).

A single clump of C. gigantea here and there is common in home
gardens, but there are also many commercial producers with entire
fields of the plant, in warmer southern areas.

Both species are summer crops here.

Peter

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From: LMassey628 at aol.com on 2005.05.24 at 05:00:40(12957)
In a message dated 5/24/2005 2:11:51 AM Eastern Standard Time, pjm@gol.com writes:

Colocasia esculenta (sat-imo in japanese) is the main species grown, usually for the corms, but some cultivars are also used as stem vegetables.

Colocasia gigantea (hasu-imo in Japanese) is only grown as a stem vegetable, with an almost completely non-acrid petiole (can be peeled and then sliced thinly and eaten as a vinegared pickle).

A single clump of C. gigantea here and there is common in home gardens, but there are also many commercial producers with entire fields of the plant, in warmer southern areas.

Both species are summer crops here.

Peter

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From: "David S." maui4me at charter.net> on 2005.05.24 at 12:51:12(12958)
Re: [Aroid-l] Alocasia robusta & Colocasia gigantea----- Original
Message -----
To: Discussion of aroids
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From: RAYMOMATTLA at cs.com on 2005.05.24 at 16:04:33(12959)
I have lots of success with Colocasia gigantea here in the Upstate South Carolina area where we recieve temps near 10F every few years. In fact, I accidentally left a C. gigantea bulb out all year long....above ground, a few years ago, and it survived and sprouted. The low that winter was 19F at my house. C. esculenta is hit or miss and when it does survive it comes back slower and with less vigor than the C. gigantea. Both are doing well this year but it was a very mild winter, (with temps in the 70's nearly all the way through January.)
Michael M.
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From: "Julius Boos" ju-bo at msn.com> on 2005.05.25 at 16:23:41(12963)
>From: "David S."
<maui4me@charter.net>
>Reply-To: Discussion of aroids
<aroid-l@gizmoworks.com>
>To: "Discussion of aroids"
<aroid-l@gizmoworks.com>
>Subject: Re: [Aroid-l] Alocasia
robusta & Colocasia gigantea
>Date: Tue, 24 May 2005 15:51:12
-0400
>
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From: "Julius Boos" ju-bo at msn.com> on 2005.05.25 at 16:32:46(12964)
>> Are either one of these plants known as "Malanga" ? I picked
up some malanga at the grocery store and they have been living happily under
a rainspout. Linda <<

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From: "David S." maui4me at charter.net> on 2005.05.26 at 20:30:42(12966)
> Subject: Re: [Aroid-l] Alocasia robusta Colocasia gigantea
>
> Dear Peter,
>
> Thanks for the information! I had NO idea that the true Colocasia
gigantea
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From: "Bryant, Susan L." SLBryant at scj.com> on 2005.05.27 at 05:28:43(12967)
I think Malanga is usually Xanthosoma. Here is the link to the page.
http://www.aroid.org/links/index.html#Aroid%20Ethnobotany%20and%20Cuisin
e

It is on the IAS website under Links, and then look for Aroid
Ethnobotany and Cuisine.

Susan

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From: "Abrimaal Svartvinter" abrimaal at o2.pl> on 2005.05.27 at 14:29:52(12969)
Most of the common names you have them here:

http://www.kallus.com/aroids/ediblearoids.htm

Greetinds

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