IAS Aroid Quasi Forum

About Aroid-L
 This is a continuously updated archive of the Aroid-L mailing list in a forum format - not an actual Forum. If you want to post, you will still need to register for the Aroid-L mailing list and send your postings by e-mail for moderation in the normal way.

  Sauromatum guttatum culture
From: Kyle Baker kylefletcherbaker at yahoo.com> on 2005.07.01 at 17:53:37(13091)
I've two pots of Sauromatum gutatum? for going on 6
years now and though they send up lots of foliage
they never bloom...I've allowed them to die back each
winter and keep on dry side all winter and then water
and feed around may and up they come again...I'm
trying to search for proper culture but having no
results....

+More
From: "danny wilson" mudwasp_ at hotmail.com> on 2005.07.01 at 22:57:52(13094)
my experience with S. venosum (formerly S guttatum and now typhonium venosum) is taht if you leave them alone, not let them sit in water and not let them freeze they will leave out and bloom. i cant think of a reason that they wouldnt, especially after 6 years...>From: Kyle Baker >Reply-To: Discussion of aroids >To: Discussion of aroids >Subject: [Aroid-l] Re: Sauromatum guttatum culture>Date: Fri, 1 Jul 2005 17:53:37 -0700 (PDT)>>I've two pots of Sauromatum gutatum? for going on 6>years now and though they send up lots of foliage>they never bloom...I've allowed them to die back each>winter and keep on dry side all winter and then water>and feed around may and up they come
+More
From: "W. George Schmid" hostahill at bellsouth.net> on 2005.07.02 at 07:00:46(13096)
Kyle,
What are your min/max temperatures during the growth cycle? - are the pots
outdoors or in a greenhouse?
Here they grow and bloom like weeds, but it is hot in summer 80-95 deg. F.
days 75-80 deg F nights.
It might be low temps or a short season.
BTW, Sauromatum venosum has been reclassified. It is now Typhonium venosum
(Dryand. ex Aiton) Hett. & P.C. Boyce.
George

+More
From: "W. George Schmid" hostahill at bellsouth.net> on 2005.07.02 at 07:28:30(13097)
Kyle,
The inflorescence appears here in May,before the leaf comes up. My blooming
size plants have leaf stems that reach 48-52 inches and they are full size
by the end of June. G.
W. George Schmid
+More
From: "Susan Cox" snalice at dslextreme.com> on 2005.07.02 at 13:13:08(13099)
>S. venosum
(formerly S guttatum and now typhonium venosum)<

I have a question about the name of this
Aroid. I recall a conversation going about the name of this plant about 5
or so years ago and I thought the name change sequence was just the reverse
of mentioned here. I thought originally, this plant was called typhonium venosum, was corrected to Saromatum
venosum, then changed to Saromatum guttatum. Did I get this all switched
backwards? Which is the correct name?

Susan

+More
From: Kyle Baker kylefletcherbaker at yahoo.com> on 2005.07.02 at 18:23:53(13105)
--- Susan Cox wrote:

> >S. venosum (formerly S guttatum and now typhonium
> venosum)<
All I know is that the nursery that I work for sold it

+More
From: Kyle Baker kylefletcherbaker at yahoo.com> on 2005.07.02 at 18:27:03(13106)
Guess I'm gonna have to take a pic and post it to show
what I'm growing here..lol...

kfb - maine

+More
From: Kyle Baker kylefletcherbaker at yahoo.com> on 2005.07.02 at 18:31:06(13107)
--- "W. George Schmid"
wrote:
Kyle, What are your min/max temperatures during the
+More
From: Walter Greenwood walterg at nauticom.net> on 2005.07.03 at 05:19:41(13113)
Kyle,

My cultural method is to drop them in the ground and stand back. I am
also in zone 5 (Pittsburgh, Pennsylvania), with much the same
temperature profile, and mine overwinter in the ground just fine and
flower quite freely. Having said that, we don't get down into the -15F
to -20F very often, certainly not every year. I dig up what I can find
and bring them in, but I probably miss more than half of them. I never
manage to put every one that I dug up back in - there are just too many
of them. Most of mine are on the periphery of a horse manure pile, so
they have a supplementary heat source even in the coldest weather, but
other plants far away from the manure pile also make it through the
winter under a hay mulch.

-WG

+More
From: "Leo A. Martin" leo1010 at attglobal.net> on 2005.07.04 at 08:25:14(13119)
Also remember these things are spider mite magnets. I can't keep them
alive here in Phoenix since I don't have a wet greenhouse and the
highest constant humidity I can manage is about 40% on a good day.

By the way, some of the commoner Amorphophallus do just fine here in low
humidity in full shade.

Leo

+More
From: "Deni Bown" deni at yaxhampark.co.uk> on 2005.07.05 at 02:55:16(13121)
Greetings to all fans of Typhonium venosum, the aroid with a spathe like
leopard skin, a smell like you've trodden in something, and the most elegant
exotic-looking foliage for a temperate garden.

If it's any help in the discussion, every year my plants bloom, set fruits,
and self-seed in both sun and shade in my garden in Norfolk, England, where
we have relatively cold wet autumns, winters and springs, from October to
April, interspersed with brief periods below freezing - usually no lower
than minus 7 C (about 21 F), but hardly an improvement to sodden wet ground.
The tubers must therefore be very tolerant of both low temps and wet
conditions when dormant.

With low temperatures, plants don't usually show signs of life till June - I
have some still blooming now in very shady places - but soon make up for
lost time. They get biggest in areas that are mulched annually with
mushroom compost (i.e. waste from mushroom growing that consists of
well-rotted, sterilized straw + horse manure).

In other words, it's as tough as old boots, so unless you live in
permafrost, swamp, or desert, I would plant it out and see how it does.

All the best,

Deni Bown

+More
From: Kyle Baker kylefletcherbaker at yahoo.com> on 2005.07.05 at 08:09:26(13124)
Th'x to all for advice on Sauromatum guttatum
culture...I can't leave them in the ground due to the
fact that maine has wet clay and I know they will rot
as I have no well drained areas..am continuing my
research and am actually finding some good info...

kfb - maine

+More
From: "Abrimaal Svartvinter" abrimaal at o2.pl> on 2005.07.05 at 09:28:07(13125)
When Typhonium venosum grows outdoors, spider mites never attack it.

Greets
Abrimaal

+More
From: Baumfarn Webmaster webmaster at baumfarn.at> on 2005.07.05 at 14:45:58(13129)
spider mite magnets.

At least I'm not alone! :-( (Austria, Vienna)

greetings
Peter

+More
From: "W. George Schmid" hostahill at bellsouth.net> on 2005.07.06 at 11:24:03(13142)
I have grown Typhonium venosum for 25 years and never see spider mites on
them. G.
W. George Schmid
+More
From: "David S." maui4me at charter.net> on 2005.07.09 at 00:00:38(13158)
I disagree. I've been growing these outdoors in the ground for over twenty
years and have spider mite infestations to varying degrees almost every
year.

Kyle, I hope you've been changing the soil annually in your pots of these,
as well as removing offsets if they'll detach easily. If well grown, the
corm grows substantially each year until they get about 4" diameter. I've
had them flower when only a little over 2" diameter, which only takes one or
two years after separating it from the mother plant. I have some of mine
planted in straight Tennessee red clay and they do well but I doubt you
could overwinter them outdoors in Maine regardless of how deep they were
planted and mulched. If you give an individual corm room to grow, say not
over one or two babies in a one gallon pot, then you should get quite a bit
of corm growth each year. They won't flower well if crowded.

David Sizemore

+More
Note: this is a very old post, so no reply function is available.