IAS Aroid Quasi Forum

About Aroid-L
 This is a continuously updated archive of the Aroid-L mailing list in a forum format - not an actual Forum. If you want to post, you will still need to register for the Aroid-L mailing list and send your postings by e-mail for moderation in the normal way.

  Amorphophallus Hewitii Dormancy
From: Neil Gordon neil at ng23.abelgratis.co.uk> on 2005.08.23 at 06:11:04(13302)
Hi, I have 2 A. Hewitii plants that I planted as seed. After a year of
growth one of those plants has gone dormant, and the other is in the
process of going dormant.

Now, the first plant has been dormant for about 3-4 weeks, and has now
decided to grow another shoot, and start growing again!

Is this normal for these plants to have such a short dormancy period?
I thought that it should have been about 3-4 months, not weeks!! or is
it as youngsters, these guys try to grow as much as they can in as
short a period as possible?

Neil

+More
From: Ronmchatton at aol.com on 2005.08.23 at 08:47:29(13303)
It's my experience that the tropical species often have very short dormant periods if dormancy occurs during the warm summer months. I have a titanum that routinely goes dormant at the end of July and is back up again before the end of August while another that enters dormancy in the late Fall and will not re-emerge until early Spring.

Ron McHatton

+More
From: "Wilbert Hetterscheid" hetter at xs4all.nl> on 2005.08.23 at 12:27:02(13304)
Yep, this is normal. Most species from Borneo have VERY short resting
periods during which the tubers must NEVER dry out!!! Also they appreciate a
well-aerated (is that a word??) soil and LOTS of water!!!!!!! Ask Peter
Boyce, he has first-hand experience and I believe him since the days I am
doing this too, after having had trouble with these bast....errrr, difficult
plants for years!

Wilbert

+More
From: "Peter Boyce" peterboyce at myjaring.net> on 2005.08.24 at 02:07:30(13307)
Wilbert is absolutely correct. We find that none of the indigenous Bornean
Amorphs are dormant for long. In fact, many species are effectively in leaf
all the time in that a new leaf is emerging as the old leaf is in its final
stages of senescence. We grow in coconut peat, coconut fibre, washed coarse
sand and a small proportion of burnt soil, water copiously and also feed
copiously. The minimum at the nursery here is 22 C (c. 72 F) and the maximum
34 C (c. 93 F).

Peter

+More
From: Neil Gordon neil at ng23.abelgratis.co.uk> on 2005.08.24 at 08:02:55(13311)
Damn - I was looking forward to some extra space to put plants while
this rested.

Yay - Everythings normal!

The soil I have them in is very well aerated, lots of sand in the mix,
so far, these guys (and the Titanum seed I bought) have been no trouble
at all!

Thanks for the reply!

Neil

+More
From: "Wilbert Hetterscheid" hetter at xs4all.nl> on 2005.08.24 at 20:40:11(13313)
That would
be:

eburneus
brachyphyllus
rugosus
pendulus
venustus
hottae (althought THIS
one can do with more average soil and less water)
angulatus
julaihii
hewittii
lambii
borneensis
tinekeae
infundibuliformis
costatus
linguiformis

Cheerio,
Wilbert

+More
From: Mike! Mike at MikeMiller.com> on 2005.08.25 at 06:16:52(13319)
Wilbert is absolutely correct. We find that none of the indigenous
Bornean Amorphs are dormant for long. In fact, many species are
effectively in leaf all the time in that a new leaf is emerging as
the old leaf is in its final stages of senescence. We grow in
coconut peat, coconut fibre, washed coarse sand and a small
proportion of burnt soil, water copiously and also feed copiously.
The minimum at the nursery here is 22 C (c. 72 F) and the maximum 34
C (c. 93 F).

Peter, can you speak to the "burnt soil" component of your potting
medium? What does it add to the party? How is it prepared? Just
guessing here, but is charcoal anywhere close to a reasonable substitute?

Thanks for the info,
Mike!

+More
From: Bryan Lampl blampl1 at earthlink.net> on 2005.08.25 at 08:37:01(13320)
I recently acquired an Amorphophallus tinekeae tuber and it appears to be
coming out of dormancy. Unfortunately, keeping it moist seems to be a
problem. The outside of the tuber is trying to break down and I am afraid
it will be a loss before the plant can emerge. I have also had similar
trouble with borneensis.

+More
Note: this is a very old post, so no reply function is available.