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  Intrageneric crossing - a good reference
From: Peter Matthews pjm at gol.com> on 2006.01.22 at 17:13:29(13766)
Title: Re: [Aroid-l] Intrageneric crossing - a good
reference

H. Yoshino, T. Ochiai and M. Tahara (2000) Phylogenetic

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From: "Julius Boos" ju-bo at msn.com> on 2006.01.23 at 20:23:48(13773)
Reply-To : Discussion of aroids
Sent : Monday, January 23, 2006 1:13 AM
To : Discussion of aroids
Subject : Re: [Aroid-l] Intrageneric crossing - a good reference

Dear Peter,

Thanks---to put this in a nutshell, it is suspected and confirmed by the
1988 testing that the ORIGINAL collected plant was a hybrid between two
COLOCASIA species, C. esculenta X C. gigantia, not between a Colocasia X
Alocasia. AND--a cross between Alocasia brsibanensis X Colocasia
esculenta was made by man, ONE seed developed into ONE plant. This
confirms that a cross is remotely possible between these two seemingly
closely related genera, in which the dividing lines between these two genera
are still vague, and that it is easier for two different species within the
SAME genus can and will cross.

Julius

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From: Tony Avent tony at plantdelights.com> on 2006.01.24 at 04:16:40(13774)
Peter:

Your note is quite interesting about the possible mis-classification of
Colocasia gigantea. I have always found it unusual that C. gigantea
seems to have more phenotypic characteristics of alocasia than
colocasia...very interesting. Sounds like a research paper is needed.
Tony Avent

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From: "Abrimaal" abrimaal at wp.pl> on 2006.01.28 at 07:22:43(13778)
Maybe someday Colocasia and Alocasia will
become one genus... the difference is only in number of ovules in a female
flower (I don't know what about cytology).

Marek

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From: "Alistair Hay" ajmhay at hotmail.com> on 2006.01.28 at 13:45:34(13781)
Colocasia geography, synflorescence architecture, fruit, seeds and dispersal syndrome are different from Alocasia too...... Colocasia much closer to Remusatia etc than to Alocasia. Colocasia gigantea is clearly a Colocasia!
Alistair

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From: "Peter Boyce" botanist at malesiana.com> on 2006.01.28 at 14:39:56(13782)
Hi Marek

There's a lot more to it than just ovule number. They have very different
inforescence shoot morphology and infructescence/fruit/seed structure, the
latter linked to diffent dispersal mechanisms.

Before we all get too excited about intergeneric hybrids 'proving' that two
genera should be moerged it's wort recalling the number of intergeneric hybrids
in the orchids, especially the vandoid orchids, where I beleive up to seven
genera (maybe more - I'm a tad out of date) have been used to make a commercial
hybrid including crosses involving Phalaenopsis and Vanda.
Pete

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From: RAYMOMATTLA at cs.com on 2006.01.29 at 15:24:02(13783)
Good point Peter, this can also been seen in a few palms including Syragus, Butia and Jubaea.

Michael
_______________________________________________

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From: hermine hermine at endangeredspecies.com> on 2006.01.29 at 18:02:31(13785)
Before we all get too excited about intergeneric hybrids 'proving'
that two genera should be merged it's wort recalling the number of
intergeneric hybrids in the orchids, especially the vandoid orchids,
where I believe up to seven genera (maybe more - I'm a tad out of
date) have been used to make a commercial hybrid including crosses
involving Phalaenopsis and Vanda.
Pete

and the NAMES you have to make up for them!
you might know this already and not even care...but the position
among the Liliaceae of Sansevieria is still being debated hotly by
the 12 people who care.
I am slightly terrified of orchid breeders.

hermine

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From: "Peter Boyce" botanist at malesiana.com> on 2006.01.30 at 00:01:24(13787)
Hermine

Just to make you even MORE scared, most people don't even put Sanseveria in
the Liliaceae any more...

What frustrates me about all the efforts expended on family shuffling &
debating is that, e.g., c. 65% of the aroids of Borneo have yet to receive
even ONE name!

Pete

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From: "Peter Boyce" botanist at malesiana.com> on 2006.01.30 at 00:04:38(13788)
aduh! as they say here in Malaysia

----- Original Message -----
From:

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From: hermine hermine at endangeredspecies.com> on 2006.01.30 at 00:55:45(13790)
At 12:01 AM 1/30/2006, Peter Boyce wrote:

Hermine

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From: don7T1 at webtv.net on 2006.01.30 at 07:22:36(13791)
If it works for us folks & orchids --then why not aroids??

_______________________________________________
Aroid-l mailing list

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From: bonaventure at optonline.net on 2006.02.02 at 11:12:36(13798)
Perhaps the way of the future in aroids:

Cell Res. 2005 Sep;15(9):734-8. Related Articles, Links

A novel in vitro system for gamete fusion in maize.

Peng XB, Sun MX, Yang HY.

Key Laboratory of Ministry of Education for Plant Developmental Biology, College of Life Sciences, Wuhan University, China.

Various systems by using electric pulse, calcium, or polyethylene glycol have been developed in the past decade for the in vitro fusion of plant gametes. These in vitro systems provide a new way to study the fertilization mechanisms of plants. In this study, we developed a bovine serum albumin (BSA)-mediated fusion system for the in vitro fusion of maize gametes. The in vitro fusion of the isolated single egg cell and sperm cell of maize was observed microscopically in the BSA solution and the fertilized egg cell showed normal cell wall regeneration and nuclear division. The effects of the BSA concentration, pH value and calcium level on the efficiency of the maize gamete fusion were also assessed. BSA concentration and pH value did significantly affect the efficiency of the gamete fusion. Calcium was not necessary for the gamete fusion when BSA was present. The optimal solution for the gamete fusion contained 0.1% BSA, pH 6.0. The fusion frequency was as high as 96.7% in th
at optimal solution. This new in vitro fertilization system offers an alternative tool for the in vitro study of fertilization mechanisms with much simpler manipulating procedure than PEG system, and it will be especially useful for the in vitro study of the calcium dynamics during plant fertilization.

PMID: 16212880 [PubMed - indexed for MEDLINE]

Bonaventure Magrys

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From: hermine hermine at endangeredspecies.com> on 2006.02.02 at 11:54:27(13799)
At 01:03 PM 2/2/2006, Eric Schmidt wrote:

Sansevieria has recently been placed into Ruscaceae.

Eric
Orlando,FL

what villain did this?

hermine

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From: "Peter Boyce" botanist at malesiana.com> on 2006.02.02 at 12:54:03(13801)
Hi Hermine

At the risk of boring a large percentage of aroid-l subscribers, since this
isn't a forum to discuss evolutionary systematics (phylogenetics), I'm all
in favour of making systematic studies to better understand plant
relationships based on their evolutionary lineages and strongly advocate
this type of study rather then the former method of 'it looks similar thus
it must be related' approach to sysematics; what worries me is the number of
students veering directly to the lab. to do their work while,
conservatively, a third of all living things have yet to receive a
scientific name.

Pete

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From: Eric Schmidt leu242 at yahoo.com> on 2006.02.02 at 13:03:38(13802)
Sansevieria has recently been placed into Ruscaceae.

Eric

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