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  Tasting Lemna minor
From: ted.held at us.henkel.com on 2006.03.21 at 05:30:30(13984)
In the spirit of reckless scientific curiosity, I tasted a few specimens of Lemna minor last night. I am pleased, and somewhat disappointed to record that I could not detect any taste at all. They have a pleasant sort of crispy texture and might serve to bulk up a salad in an interesting way. On the other hand, Lemna patches in the wild host vast numbers of small animals and such, so cleaning them sufficiently for human consumption would be a problem. So caution is urged for the daring. But my home-raised Lemna, a nuisance rather than a deliberate cultivation, are quite clean and I had no qualms about fishing out a few for the experiment. And here I am this morning, still alive, with no apparent ill-effects from the experience.

I speculate that I am the only person on this list to have consumed a whole raw aroid, including leaves, in one sitting.

Ted._______________________________________________

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From: Marion Haste hermine at endangeredspecies.com> on 2006.03.21 at 11:46:57(13985)
At 05:30 AM 3/21/2006, you wrote:
In the spirit of
reckless scientific curiosity, I tasted a few specimens of Lemna minor
last night. I am pleased, and somewhat disappointed to record that I
could not detect any taste at all. They have a pleasant sort of crispy
texture and might serve to bulk up a salad in an interesting
way.
I ate them as a child when they grew prolifically in an aquarium. they
were a bit like alfalfa sprouts, in a bland and generic kind of
way.
hermine

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From: "Abrimaal" abrimaal at wp.pl> on 2006.03.21 at 11:51:52(13986)
Lemna has no leaves :P

Marek

----- Original Message -----

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From: bonaventure at optonline.net on 2006.03.23 at 20:34:51(13989)
Yes, and look at us now, with all the plants... we're all nuts!
Bonaventure Magrys
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From: Don Martinson llmen at wi.rr.com> on 2006.03.25 at 17:25:39(13990)
Yes, and look at us now, with all the plants... we're all nuts!
Bonaventure Magrys
Cliffwood Beach, NJ USA zone 7

Yes, and look at us now, with all the plants... we're all nuts!

Bonaventure Magrys

Cliffwood Beach, NJ USA zone 7

Well, with a bit of lemon juice, sugar, flower and egg white, you
might be able to make a
Lemna Merengue Pie.

--
Don Martinson

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From: "Eduardo Goncalves" edggon at hotmail.com> on 2006.03.27 at 09:29:42(13993)
Guys,

I really enjoy experience new tastes and foods. However, Lemna are fast
growing plants that are used to remove metal traces from ponds (including
toxic metals). I am part of a project that studies the ability of Lemna and
Pistia to grow and remove metallic traces from contamined ponds, so they can
be completely removed if you take plants out of the water. That means that
you should be worried not only with the extra proteins from worms and water
bugs but with what kind of neurotoxic or carcinogenic metals you are eating.
If you are planning to eat Lemna, follow Julius' recipe (seems tasty...),
but cultivate your own plants in safe water.

Very best
wishes,

Eduardo.

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