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  Philodendron verrucosum
From: "MJ Hatfield" mjhatfield at oneota.org> on 2006.03.26 at 17:43:06(13992)
Do
any of you grow Philodendron verrucosum? (I don’t but it is very lovely.)

What
can you tell me about it? (Besides how lovely it is.)

Thanks.

MJ Hatfield

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From: Neil Crafter golfstra at senet.com.au> on 2006.03.28 at 22:14:09(13996)
Dear MJ
I love P verrucosum, one of my favourite philos, with its red infusion at the back of the leaf blade and the branching pattern venation - plus the 'hairy' petioles! But its a bugger to grow - very sensitive I have found and I think it likes very high humidity and doesn't seem to like getting too cool. My plants leaves are fairly small and the internodes get fairly long and the stem fairly thin, but I have seen it in the tropics with rather large leaves and thick stem.
A lovely, but difficult plant in my experience.
cheers Neil

Neil Crafter

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From: EGoldfluss at aol.com on 2006.03.29 at 04:56:43(13998)
Sorry Neil but I have to disagree. I have been growing P. verrucosum
on a windowsill in my back bedroom in partially obstructed eastern light for
several years. It receives no special attention at all. It is growing
beside an A. warocqueanum, a P. melsanochrysum and a P. warzewiczii.

They are all potted in a fast draining mix and all are totemed on sphagnum
poles. All are allowed to go to the dry side between thorough waterings
and sometimes neglected. I move them outside for the summer months into
a heavily obstructed Southern exposure and watered more
frequently.

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From: "Russ" chammer at cfl.rr.com> on 2006.03.29 at 06:18:00(13999)
Agreed on the difficulty of growing
verrucosum in normal growing conditions, including a shadehouse. I
imagine in a high humidity, temp-controlled, wet-wall greenhouse, it would thrive. I've tried verrucosum several times without
success.

Russ

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From: Betsy Feuerstein ecuador at midsouth.rr.com> on 2006.03.29 at 07:22:29(14000)
Philodendron verrucosmum has many variations or if you are a
botanist, many species that are similar. I have seen the leaves get to
be huge and in full sun and I have seen it small at very high altitude
in the Andes where it is cold as stew. It seems to just range along in
the understory usually. Some have the hairy petioles and some do not.
Some have tons of red veination and much color and others are more
monochromatic. Another words, my verrucosmum may not be the same bird
as your verrucosum. One thing for sure, some of them are
gorgeous................ I grow it in a greenhouse and it wanders all
over the place but try to tame it, and you may be sorry. Cutting it
when it is not a good time for it and you may well kill all of it, both
the cutting and the base. Then again, it may just take off. Sort of
like other philos for me.

Good growing to all......... Betsy

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From: Big Herm hermine at endangeredspecies.com> on 2006.03.29 at 08:18:41(14001)
At 06:18 AM 3/29/2006, you wrote:

Agreed on the difficulty of growing
verrucosum in normal growing conditions, including a
shadehouse. I imagine in a high humidity, temp-controlled,
wet-wall greenhouse, it would thrive. I've tried verrucosum several
times without success.

Russ
central Fla

I grew mine eventually in a terrarium. I found it did OK, which is to
say, it did not thrive, even in a greenhouse unless i grew it in the
hyper humid, steamy hot greenhouse we called MALARIA, and which we used
as an intense propagating house.
hermine

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From: "Denis Rotolante" denis at skg.com> on 2006.03.29 at 09:15:48(14004)
Title: Message

We
have grown P. verrucosum in the nursery but never any large numbers. Like so
many plants which originate in a cloud forest type environment it does not
appreciate our Summer heat and always grows much better in the cooler Fall
Winter and Spring Months. In the summer it stops growing and just stares back at
you when you walk by. It is hard to root the cuttings so we lay the vines out on
a tray of chopped sphagnum moss so they can grow roots at the nodes into the
sphagnum.

Denis

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From: Ron Kaufmann kaufmann at sandiego.edu> on 2006.03.29 at 11:05:01(14007)
According to records in the W3 Tropicos database, P.
verrucosum has a very wide range, including Costa Rica, Nicaragua, Panama,
Colombia, Ecuador, and Peru. Across this range, it has been reported
from elevations of 50-2000 m, a truly impressive climatic breadth!!
Assuming that P. verrucosum from across the entire range aren't a single,
freely mixing gene pool, I'd guess that the cultural requirements of an
individual plant will depend quite a lot on where it (or its parent(s))
originated. Betsy Feuerstein posted a message describing the diversity
of plants that appear to be P. verrucosum (varying degrees of petiole fuzz,
varying leaf size and color, varying habitat), and I can second her observations,
having seen some of these beauties growing in the wild in Ecuador.
For anyone interested in seeing photos of Ecuadorian P. verrucosum, I have
several posted on my web site at home.sandiego.edu/~kaufmann/aroids.html
(click on "Ecuadorian Aroids" and "Zamora" to see the P. verrucosum pictures).
I have P. verrucosum from Central America and several
from Ecuador in an intermediate greenhouse that stays moderately humid
and reaches temperatures of 85 deg during the day, with night temperatures
at this time of year down into the low 50s. The Ecuadorian plants,
which are diverse, seem to grow better under these conditions than the
Central American plants, and I've been impressed at the speed with which
they shoot upward, once they're established. A really beautiful species,
and one that I personally find well worth growing!
Ron
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From: Big Herm hermine at endangeredspecies.com> on 2006.03.29 at 12:06:39(14010)
At 09:15 AM 3/29/2006, you wrote:

We have grown P. verrucosum in
the nursery but never any large numbers. Like so many plants which
originate in a cloud forest type environment it does not appreciate our
Summer heat and always grows much better in the cooler Fall Winter and
Spring Months. In the summer it stops growing and just stares back at you
when you walk by. It is hard to root the cuttings so we lay the vines out
on a tray of chopped sphagnum moss so they can grow roots at the nodes
into the sphagnum.

Denis

I hate the way they just stare at you like that! where are you?
this sounds terribly southern california to me.
hermine

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From: "Weaver, Bill" bill.weaver at hp.com> on 2006.03.29 at 22:56:52(14016)
I got one from Ecuagenera and they said it was a cool
grower. We'll see.

Bill

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