IAS Aroid Quasi Forum

About Aroid-L
 This is a continuously updated archive of the Aroid-L mailing list in a forum format - not an actual Forum. If you want to post, you will still need to register for the Aroid-L mailing list and send your postings by e-mail for moderation in the normal way.

  Amorphophallus and Anthurium
From: "D. Christopher Rogers" crogers at ecoanalysts.com> on 2006.11.10 at 14:55:09(14795)
Hiya,

Two separate questions:

1) Can Amorphophallus
taurostigma be stored dry during dormancy?

2)
I was given a very small offshoot of Anthurium warocqueanum, with two leaves less than
an inch in length, and a small root bud. It was removed from the parent main
stem. I have planted it in epiphyte mix (because I do not know what else to do
with it) and put it in the darkest corner of my greenhouse, in conditions that
are similar to where the parent was growing. Can anyone tell me what I need to
do to keep it alive and growing?

Thank you all
in advance!

Christopher

+More
From: "Tom Croat" Thomas.Croat at mobot.org> on 2006.11.10 at 19:58:52(14796)
Dear Christoper:

Lynn Hannon always had a lot
of luck with things like this in sphagnum and in a plastic box under her
benches. It will need a lot of humidity but no water except for occasionally
moistening the sphagnum. A see through plastic lid allows you to inspect it
without disturbing it.

Tom

+More
From: "Wilbert Hetterscheid" hetter at xs4all.nl> on 2006.11.11 at 02:56:01(14797)
Amorphophallus taurostigma must be kept dry. It is very
sensitive to rot when kept in soil.

Wilbert Hetterscheid

+More
From: "D. Christopher Rogers" crogers at ecoanalysts.com> on 2006.11.12 at 13:39:26(14804)
Thank you, Tom!

How dark should I keep them?

Christopher

+More
From: "D. Christopher Rogers" crogers at ecoanalysts.com> on 2006.11.12 at 13:40:26(14805)
Thanks for
all the good advice, from all who rallied $B!F(Bround.

Christopher

+More
From: "Tom Croat" Thomas.Croat at mobot.org> on 2006.11.13 at 11:11:32(14807)
Dear Christopher:

It
is probably not the extent of darkness that is important but the temperature
and the degree of humidity. If you bring it up too high in the greenhouse
the light would be better but it could be too hot. Obviously plants respond
favorbly to light, not darkness but the temperature control must be monitored
because if you have nice humidity with too much light you will develop too much
heat. Alternatively conditions too dark might not work either. Clearly
regrowing sick or weak plants is a slow process some times.

Tom

+More
Note: this is a very old post, so no reply function is available.